RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Are these Realistic Rates?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 02-18-2011, 05:09 AM
creativeretouch creativeretouch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London
Posts: 502
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

I am sure this video was created for garibaldi:

http://hiendworkshops.com/2010/12/09...n-blaise-cakes

Reply With Quote top
  #22  
Old 02-18-2011, 05:21 AM
ashphotoart's Avatar
ashphotoart ashphotoart is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: India
Posts: 301
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

I never stand for a fixed prize, I discuss the job first and calculate my time for the treatment I'm gonna to apply on every image. according to my hourly rate I quote my prize to the client. and if needed we negotiate on them.
Reply With Quote top
  #23  
Old 02-18-2011, 07:31 AM
TerryB TerryB is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Coastal South Carolina
Posts: 27
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jessicaporter1 View Post
So I am in the process of setting up my Rates. I feel I do good quality work and should start seeing some compensation for the long hours I spend into retouching. here goes...


20 or more images- 8$ an image
10 images- 10$ and image
1-5 Images- 15$ an image


Also... what is your preferred method of payment? I mostly see paypal.

THANK YOU!

- Jessica
Both the hourly rate and the flat rate are no-win propositions for the restorer until he/she has CLOSELY inspected the ACTUAL photo.

Better yet, do a scan to be able to truly determine how much work will be involved to efficiently select/extract that which needs to be masked/color corrected and/or repaired. This will give you a basis with which you can reasonably estimate the time required.

I always insist on cash or check (if I know the customer).

Here's my post from a while back on essentially the same subject:

I hope it helps.

The following has worked well for me over the past eight years or so, but remember your mileage may vary.

I've never used a form because it can't anticipate every possibility.

Inspect the photo with a loupe, or at least a good magnifying glass and/or do a scan as mentioned above.

If possible, make a xerographic copy or quick & dirty scan/print, review changes with the customer and mark it up as you go along. That becomes the form and occasionally comes in very handy when reviewing the initial proof with the customer.

Determine the final PRINTED size; an enlargement will require much more time than a same size or reduction in size.

Determine your hourly rate and estimate the amount of time the resto will take. Multiply the hourly rate by 1.5 the number of estimated working hours, including scanning and rescanning at a different angle. This assumes you make a second (sometimes third) scan for subsequent use on separate layers to quickly eliminate the minor blemishes with nudges and corrections in various layer modes.

Give the customer that estimate and tell them it will not be exceeded, and there's a good possibility it will be less depending upon how much can be fixed with the scan.

More often than not, a reasonable customer will accept the price and be pleasantly surprised when (if) the cost is less than the estimate (NEVER use the word "quote"). This pricing strategy has garnered many repeat customers as well as new customers by word-of-mouth.

Explain the time differences between restoration (color correction, blemishes, tears) versus reconstruction (replacing/repairing body parts, matching clothing/furniture/wall patterns and textures).

There is the occasional customer who will whine about the price or state that he/she didn't have any idea it would cost that much. If things are slow and you want the business, ask them how much they think it's worth. That question can be very revealing and help you determine whether or not you want them for a customer. Whatever the price, put it in writing.

As an aside, I tell them that the estimated price includes one revision.

I generally get a 50% deposit up front with new customers and tell them if they don't like the final result, there's no cost. But, of course, they don't get the print if they don't like it.
Reply With Quote top
  #24  
Old 02-18-2011, 07:53 AM
SilvaFox SilvaFox is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 128
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashphotoart View Post
I never stand for a fixed prize, I discuss the job first and calculate my time for the treatment I'm gonna to apply on every image. according to my hourly rate I quote my prize to the client. and if needed we negotiate on them.
T h i s.
Reply With Quote top
  #25  
Old 02-18-2011, 02:15 PM
Markzebra's Avatar
Markzebra Markzebra is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: London, UK
Posts: 718
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Quote:
" you are kind of like a Mother Theresa of the photo world. "
And here was me thinking I was Mother Theresa of the photo world!
Reply With Quote top
  #26  
Old 02-18-2011, 11:24 PM
plugsnpixels's Avatar
plugsnpixels plugsnpixels is offline
RetouchPRO LIVE Guest Artist
Patron
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: LA area
Posts: 2,027
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

garibaldi pulls no punches but seems to sum up the ugly world of business. Jessica, you're still young and optimistic and the rot and reality of the world hasn't set in yet, but if you're going to do business, you need to grow a thick hide (Tom Petty calls it "rhino skin" and mentions something from the elephant that is useful as well) and stand up for yourself without begging.

Get the retouching chops and experience first (as described above) and you'll be more confident in your abilities and capability to charge what you really need to.

When doing computer maintenance (for example; this comes up occasionally) I've learned to quote a price for my useful services that actually embarrasses me, but people pay it without comment-! When I was in my early 20s I did some group and family photos for an older businessman in my town who told me I didn't charge enough. He asked me for a new quote, which I gave him, and then he wrote me a check...

If you need the money to live, you can't undersell yourself. Your prices might be realistic if you're doing auto color and auto levels and such using actions on large batches of images. Anything more labor intensive, nope.
Reply With Quote top
  #27  
Old 02-19-2011, 07:42 AM
jessicaporter1's Avatar
jessicaporter1 jessicaporter1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 55
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Quote:
Originally Posted by plugsnpixels View Post
garibaldi pulls no punches but seems to sum up the ugly world of business. Jessica, you're still young and optimistic and the rot and reality of the world hasn't set in yet, but if you're going to do business, you need to grow a thick hide (Tom Petty calls it "rhino skin" and mentions something from the elephant that is useful as well) and stand up for yourself without begging.

Get the retouching chops and experience first (as described above) and you'll be more confident in your abilities and capability to charge what you really need to.

When doing computer maintenance (for example; this comes up occasionally) I've learned to quote a price for my useful services that actually embarrasses me, but people pay it without comment-! When I was in my early 20s I did some group and family photos for an older businessman in my town who told me I didn't charge enough. He asked me for a new quote, which I gave him, and then he wrote me a check...

If you need the money to live, you can't undersell yourself. Your prices might be realistic if you're doing auto color and auto levels and such using actions on large batches of images. Anything more labor intensive, nope.
Thank you for the comment. I love the great feedback everyone has given me. A real eye opener as to how you should price yourself.

Now my question being... if you do work online, what is your preference of being paid?

- Jessica
Reply With Quote top
  #28  
Old 02-19-2011, 07:50 AM
creativeretouch creativeretouch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London
Posts: 502
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jessicaporter1 View Post
Thank you for the comment. I love the great feedback everyone has given me. A real eye opener as to how you should price yourself.

Now my question being... if you do work online, what is your preference of being paid?

- Jessica
Jessica, this is not an easy question again

Basicaly, you need to have a bank account and then you can set up your paypal account. Paypal transaction is cheaper than a bank account transfer. And your customers do not need to have their own paypal account as they are able to use their card via paypal. I found this is the best solution ...
Reply With Quote top
  #29  
Old 02-19-2011, 10:53 AM
drode drode is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Aurora, Ohio
Posts: 70
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

Great advice for any business. Many years ago as a young man I was trying to start a home improvement business. I got into a conversation with a salesman and he gave me 3 pieces of advice that I've use since then.

1) You can't be afraid to ask them for the money. His point was that I had to be confident in my prices, deposits and such.
2) Price (cutting) is he first option of the weak and the last option of the competent. Sell the customer on quality, service, speed, etc. It's sometimes better to walk away from a job than to cut your rates. (see #3)
3) Don't work cheaply. If you don't ask for enough money, you'll end up the hardest working guy in bankruptcy court. Being busy is not the same as being profitable.

For the last one, I agree with a caveat. To get started in a business or even to learn a craft or trade, it's often necessary to start at the bottom and work up.

He also gave me a formula for pricing in any business. Take how much you want to earn in a year/month/week, add in your costs to do business (all of them) and how many jobs you can conservatively do in that time.

Now add costs + profit and divide by the number of jobs and add 20% (it ALWAYS takes 20% longer or costs 20% more). That's your rate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by plugsnpixels View Post
garibaldi pulls no punches but seems to sum up the ugly world of business. Jessica, you're still young and optimistic and the rot and reality of the world hasn't set in yet, but if you're going to do business, you need to grow a thick hide (Tom Petty calls it "rhino skin" and mentions something from the elephant that is useful as well) and stand up for yourself without begging.

Get the retouching chops and experience first (as described above) and you'll be more confident in your abilities and capability to charge what you really need to.

When doing computer maintenance (for example; this comes up occasionally) I've learned to quote a price for my useful services that actually embarrasses me, but people pay it without comment-! When I was in my early 20s I did some group and family photos for an older businessman in my town who told me I didn't charge enough. He asked me for a new quote, which I gave him, and then he wrote me a check...

If you need the money to live, you can't undersell yourself. Your prices might be realistic if you're doing auto color and auto levels and such using actions on large batches of images. Anything more labor intensive, nope.
Reply With Quote top
  #30  
Old 02-19-2011, 01:04 PM
plugsnpixels's Avatar
plugsnpixels plugsnpixels is offline
RetouchPRO LIVE Guest Artist
Patron
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: LA area
Posts: 2,027
Re: Are these Realistic Rates?

I also recommend PayPal. I have used it for ebay payments and other transactions, both ways. The only bad news is, the more you make, the more PayPal makes... ;-) So figure in the cost of the transaction.

Next you need to explore with active business folks here on the forum the approach to getting deposits, payment on delivery, net-30, etc. The last thing you want is to FTP your work into the ether and never hear from the client again.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Background... Realistic shadows BPatrick Image Help 3 12-14-2010 11:42 AM
More realistic HDR shots. What do you think? DSutherland Photo Retouching 9 11-09-2010 07:10 PM
Professional Retouching LDN *portfolio rates curtisgibson Classifieds 0 10-14-2010 05:11 AM
Photo Retoucher Rates!? Bianca Carosio Work/Jobs 73 07-02-2010 08:15 AM
Realistic Aged Photo Effect? gmitchel Photo Retouching 13 12-12-2008 08:41 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved