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another frequency separation question

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Old 02-28-2011, 11:49 PM
Caravaggio Caravaggio is online now
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another frequency separation question

On this image I am trying to improve the stitching and remove the wrinkles from the leather. A lot of the wrinkles have already been removed using frequency separation.

I am wondering how to do the stitching using frequency separation? Normally I would not do this using FS. I would do it by copying a good section of the stitching to a new layer, moving it into place and free transforming it so it fit. If I want to do it using FS how would I do it? Is it possible to Command J a good section of stitching to its own layer from the high frequency layer? I tried it but the linear light blending mode of the new layer against the linear light blending mode of the high frequency layer looked really bad.

Thanks a lot.
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:48 AM
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Markzebra Markzebra is offline
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Re: another frequency separation question

Yes you can set a group to Linear Light. And then put your High Pass (or whatever) layer within this group. Anything within this group set to normal blend, then behaves as if it were a flat layer interacting with the blurred layer(s) below. Texture can be command J, and slid around freely. You can have multiple texture layers, duplicated or lifted all within this group. Much more flexible.

Just setting up two layers for this very old technique, is actually a very limited way of using it. This is not, by the way, a new technique at all.

Its not that sensible to use on skin retouching as general practice if it can be avoided - because there are better, more refined ways to work on skin. There are of course areas where there is a lot of damaged texture on skin where it can of course still be useful. But generally, learn your 'dodge and burn'. It will help with your leather sofa too. Its not a 'magic bullet', too much use of that kind of technique will make everything look like plastic. Learn to paint tone into your image quickly. Thats what separates real retouchers from those who are not.

(wondering how long before that tip makes its way onto the Model Massacre Forum) - 5 minutes?

Last edited by Markzebra; 03-01-2011 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:54 AM
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LonK LonK is offline
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Re: another frequency separation question

Once you do your Selection/Command J from the HF layer, change the new layer's blend mode to normal and clip it to the HF layer below.
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:28 AM
Caravaggio Caravaggio is online now
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Re: another frequency separation question

Thank you Markzebra and Lonk for the great information. I really appreciate it as I struggled for a long time to try to figure that out.

Mark, I did dodge and burn the leather using two different curves layers, but the difference in tonal values was too much to eliminate some of the wrinkles. Maybe I need to raise the point for the dodge curve and lower the one for the burn curve more than I did?
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:50 AM
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Markzebra Markzebra is offline
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Re: another frequency separation question

Important thing is to visualise the way the light will look best before you do it. It will not look best flat and textureless. The curves (properly controlled) and painting on them gradually will get you some of the way there. Maybe conventional cloning will also take away some of the sharper highlights, if thats what you want. I am also not sure if you really want leather to look like plastic. The image is probably slightly underexposed and has a very slight red cast (needs +C). This may help it to look fresher.
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Old 03-01-2011, 12:15 PM
Caravaggio Caravaggio is online now
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Re: another frequency separation question

Needs + C means more cyan? Actually it is not as reddish in the real image as it is in the uncolor-managed jpeg that I attached.The leather is slightly underexposed and I will try to correct the exposure for the leather. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.
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