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Approaching This Technique

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  #1  
Old 03-28-2011, 12:29 AM
photo2216 photo2216 is offline
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Approaching This Technique

I don't know what to call it. I have been seeing this technique in fashion a lot lately. Would anyone be kind enough to help me approach this darkened tone effect? Maybe it a few adjustment layers?:

http://www.jamienelson.com/fashion/1/2.htm

Thanks!

Last edited by photo2216; 03-28-2011 at 12:33 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 03-29-2011, 06:48 PM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

To my eye it just looks like the photographer used a beauty dish (and perhaps some other modifiers) and a controlled approach to the ambient light. The rest looks pretty standard. Sometimes if you do curves adjustments using the 'luminosity' mode, you can end up with some of the dark tones looking colorful. Perhaps I've missed something though.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:32 PM
K.C. K.C. is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

I too have to look at these images and wonder what you're asking about. They're just saturated and contrasty with directional light added.

A few moves in the initial conversion of the raw file would achieve this.
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Old 03-29-2011, 10:37 PM
photo2216 photo2216 is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

Thanks everyone. It was more than just a couple of moves (at least for me) to achieve the exact look. The luminosity move didn't quite do it on its own. Thanks again!
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Old 03-29-2011, 10:57 PM
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Aladdin Aladdin is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by K.C. View Post
I too have to look at these images and wonder what you're asking about. They're just saturated and contrasty with directional light added.

A few moves in the initial conversion of the raw file would achieve this.
Wow! would you please show me how, post a before and after, wish it was that simple.

This is local D&B, global D&B, at least 1 layer of Channel mixer and 2 Selective color, curves and a lot of masks. Some controlled sharpening. all this after of course the usual/essential/initial PP work.
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Old 03-29-2011, 11:05 PM
photo2216 photo2216 is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aladdin View Post
Wow! would you please show me how, post a before and after, wish it was that simple.

This is local D&B, global D&B, at least 1 layer of Channel mixer and 2 Selective color, curves and a lot of masks. Some controlled sharpening. all this after of course the usual/essential/initial PP work.
^^^^Exactly^^^^
It took me a long time to even get close to that effect. I'm not as talented as everyone else in this community. That's why I was asking for a little guidance. At least I know that I'm on the right track. Thanks again everyone!
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Old 03-30-2011, 01:41 AM
Flashtones Flashtones is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

I don't think the color and tone is so far off for hazy tropics. What type of original are you starting with?

Why these pictures work is the background colors are more subdued than the foreground, which isn't all that hard in this instance because they are comprised primarily of green foliage and blue sky, colors easily separate from skin.

If your images similarly are shot in hazy tropics with muddy green and pale blue backgrounds, you can contaminate those background colors further fairly easily with Selective Color. To your greens subtract cyan and add magenta and black. To your blues add yellow and black. Perhaps even add a pinch of black to your neutrals, yellows and red to muddy things down further.

Curves, levels or whatever to set the overall brightness value.

Obviously if your background colors are more saturated or comprised of the yellows and reds of skin your job will be tougher. But the same rules apply. Contaminate the colors you wish to downplay and accentuate those you wish to feature.
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Old 04-01-2011, 12:12 AM
photo2216 photo2216 is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashtones View Post
I don't think the color and tone is so far off for hazy tropics. What type of original are you starting with?

Why these pictures work is the background colors are more subdued than the foreground, which isn't all that hard in this instance because they are comprised primarily of green foliage and blue sky, colors easily separate from skin.

If your images similarly are shot in hazy tropics with muddy green and pale blue backgrounds, you can contaminate those background colors further fairly easily with Selective Color. To your greens subtract cyan and add magenta and black. To your blues add yellow and black. Perhaps even add a pinch of black to your neutrals, yellows and red to muddy things down further.

Curves, levels or whatever to set the overall brightness value.

Obviously if your background colors are more saturated or comprised of the yellows and reds of skin your job will be tougher. But the same rules apply. Contaminate the colors you wish to downplay and accentuate those you wish to feature.
That sounds like a good strategy. My original has foliage. I can't post it, because it's a client. But I'll definitely try it your way....
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Old 04-02-2011, 05:15 AM
Luke Kaven Luke Kaven is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

The EXIF is intact, showing the shots were made at ISO125, 1/125th, f/20 on a 5DII. There is obviously a very strong strobe for a key light, and lots of reflections off the water. Maybe the strobe is a touch warmer than the sunlight. The colors were coordinated carefully. Sounds like there is something else you are seeing in it, but I haven't figured out what it is yet. A polarizer?

Looks like Rio de Janeiro.
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  #10  
Old 04-12-2011, 01:27 AM
isaac_magana isaac_magana is offline
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Re: Approaching This Technique

In the EXIF says Photoshop CS3 was used.
Very good photos.
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