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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Stainless Steel Retouching

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  #11  
Old 04-11-2012, 08:26 AM
skoobey skoobey is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

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Originally Posted by Phaeton View Post
Hmmm, a quick way of fixing this...
I'd pay attention to a lot of what kav said – aesthetically speaking it needs more than the steel work.

To fix the streaks on the fridge – quickly – i'd run a dust and scratches with a setting where they just disappear and become a uniform surface; then mask this carefully, paying attention to keep the edges intact. The DS will ruin your edges.
Then I'd create a blank grey SL layer, run a Renders>Fibers filter to the point when I'd get the natural look of streaked brush steel. Set this layer to 4-5% opacity (or to taste) and then D&B to your heart's content.
See the link below, it might suffice for your purposes. I fixed a bit of the oven faces as well, using the same method. Though mine could do with more accurate masking and a bit more D&B

http://img859.imageshack.us/img859/2781/mg1395flat.png

Cheers
Eddie
Yep, that works! Also, cloning and then some motion blur might work too. As the texture of the metal is quite vertical!
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  #12  
Old 04-11-2012, 04:14 PM
kav kav is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

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Originally Posted by skoobey View Post
Yep, that works! Also, cloning and then some motion blur might work too. As the texture of the metal is quite vertical!
It depends on your definition of "works". Yes it's vertical. When I'm trying to figure out how to fix something, I look at reference. If you look at steel, it's not 100% consistent. There's no real substitute for putting in the work if you're looking for realistic results. If you get good at it, a lot of this smoothing doesn't take very long. The time still adds up, but it's because you're often hitting a lot of tiny details that people may not notice individually which have a cumulative effect on the image. Think of how many times we see posts on "how do I get this effect?" where often the work is broken down to such a degree that the mentality of trying to break something down into a few actions just falls flat.

I say the smoothing doesn't take as long, and it's really true. The comments about it takes hours of burning and dodging pore by pore are just completely wrong. Assuming you want to maintain some sense of realism in the final work, it is so easy to over retouch texture. I mean it's fully possible to do so in a few strokes. I think what happens is it becomes a thing of juxtaposition. You smooth out this area. Now by comparison this other area looks too rough, so you smooth that. Brush errors compound this and add to cleanup time. If any of you guys saw what percentage of my time is smoothing small details, you'd be shocked (as it isn't high). I mean if you have to clone out dust or tiny stray hairs and stuff like that, that adds up, as you want to be as accurate as possible. Smoothing skin or metal and other things adds up when you overdo them.

I don't agree that the use of filters or cloning is necessary here. It's one of those things where sometimes you can get acceptable (not perfect) results on the easy stuff, but it breaks down quickly as soon as you get into anything of a more complex nature.
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  #13  
Old 04-12-2012, 06:13 PM
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rick m rick m is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

Make a selection of the area to be cleaned up with the pen tool. Use a brush on low opacity and sample the color. Paint in the colors, add a little noise and you're there. Look at the oven in the link below.

http://www.blackdogretouching.com/Po...1/kitchen.html
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2012, 07:06 PM
Wolfman Wolfman is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

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Originally Posted by rick m View Post
Make a selection of the area to be cleaned up with the pen tool. Use a brush on low opacity and sample the color. Paint in the colors, add a little noise and you're there. Look at the oven in the link below.

http://www.blackdogretouching.com/Po...1/kitchen.html
Then you lose all the nuances of the original metal.
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  #15  
Old 04-13-2012, 10:57 AM
KTG KTG is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

One method that may hold promise----I did a quick try---is to treat the stainless like skin and do a split frequency technique. I tried a 3 pixel radius. I made individual selections of the tones on the doors and ran a blur on the low freq. layer. I also clipped a layer to the low freq layer and individually painted over the tones to even out the color. On the high freq. layer I did the normal healing and cloning of some of the streaks.

k
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  #16  
Old 04-13-2012, 11:49 AM
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shift studio shift studio is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

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Originally Posted by KTG View Post
One method that may hold promise----I did a quick try---is to treat the stainless like skin and do a split frequency technique. I tried a 3 pixel radius. I made individual selections of the tones on the doors and ran a blur on the low freq. layer. I also clipped a layer to the low freq layer and individually painted over the tones to even out the color. On the high freq. layer I did the normal healing and cloning of some of the streaks.

k
I agree - FS can be helpful.

I also tried a FS (r=5px), and put a mask revealing one door on the split group.
From the LF, I copied a tall, narrow rectangular selection to a new layer, ran a median filter on it, then transformed horizontally and perspective to match.
I lowered the contrast and opacity of the HF layer.
I created an new fake texture layer using the old noise, motion blur on a 50% gray layer.
Adjust the opacity of the HF and fake texture to get a good balance of real HF and Fake texture. Adjust the opacity of the artificial LF layer or the whole FS group to taste.

I didn't do the details, especially around the handle, but the idea is there.
Proof of concept really.

download for a closer look here >> http://shift.serveftp.net/_TjTsI-88TWqtrR

Hope it helps.
--Shift Studio.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg TrevorBrown_MG_1395.jpg (99.9 KB, 46 views)

Last edited by shift studio; 04-14-2012 at 11:31 AM.
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  #17  
Old 04-13-2012, 05:02 PM
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rick m rick m is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

"Then you lose all the nuances of the original metal."

We're talking metal not skin or clothes. Show me the nuances your average person sees and I might agree.
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  #18  
Old 04-13-2012, 07:39 PM
Wolfman Wolfman is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

Let's see your method on the actual image in this post.
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  #19  
Old 04-13-2012, 08:20 PM
kav kav is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

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Originally Posted by rick m View Post
"Then you lose all the nuances of the original metal."

We're talking metal not skin or clothes. Show me the nuances your average person sees and I might agree.
If your client was the manufacturer, their opinion would be the one that matters rather than the average person. If you've got good judgement and a steady hand, you can do things the right way in almost the same amount of time (sometimes a bit longer). At that point the cheesy filters and textureless surfacing become far less appealing, especially if this is destined for print. They're just not needed. Doing such an image as a whole is different. You have a lot of details to calculate and must assume potential revisions on the work.
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  #20  
Old 04-14-2012, 11:22 AM
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shift studio shift studio is offline
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Re: Stainless Steel Retouching

Kav, you've shown us time and again you can talk the talk. I for one think its time you show us you can walk the walk - lets see your filterless retouching - you know, the 'right way'.

--Shift Studio.
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