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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Question for the pro retouchers

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  #11  
Old 10-05-2012, 02:49 PM
ksparticus ksparticus is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

I generally retouch in RGB then convert in the end to CMYK. If there are some colors that I know will be out of gamut and won't convert properly (more desaturated) then I will let the client know as soon as possible.

As for the prints. Most of the time I will supply a Inkjet print (for visual referance only) but a loot of times certain magazines will require a matchprint (with proofing bar) bc they still want to see the halftone represent as it does when going to press.
We are moving away from the donor, matchprint technology and in the process of getting the gmg rip (which does halftone) for our Epson Stylus Pro 9900 Inkjet.
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  #12  
Old 10-07-2012, 02:16 AM
The Maestro The Maestro is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

I work with Pros and the noobs as well. I enjoy most of the pics that are submitted to me. However the trash bin percentage is 5% in my case, where I ask the client to resubmit a better version. Its really fun to retouch even the amateurs' work. sometimes the create far better style than the pros.
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  #13  
Old 10-09-2012, 12:41 AM
steenstry steenstry is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

Always convert to CMYK as late as possible in your workflow, if at all. RGB has over 60 times as much color information. If you save as CMYK, you can't get it back. Many printers prefer to do the converting to suit their particular equipment.
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  #14  
Old 10-09-2012, 05:17 AM
Jon10 Jon10 is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

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Originally Posted by steenstry View Post
Always convert to CMYK as late as possible in your workflow, if at all. RGB has over 60 times as much color information. If you save as CMYK, you can't get it back. Many printers prefer to do the converting to suit their particular equipment.
I find this interesting - as an artworker I would always try to work in CMYK from the outset to ensure that the colours I'm working with are achievable in print.

Do you ever find that in some cases the switch to RGB causes undesirable colour shifts that might require you to go back and adjust colour corrections? When colour correcting would it be worth carrying out regular test switches to CMYK just to check that there will be no nasty surprises?
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  #15  
Old 10-09-2012, 08:11 AM
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Nanls Nanls is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

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Originally Posted by Repairman View Post
Most images I work with are very good to start with. However, retouching was a lot easier when pictures were scanned by a pro and a series of images would look like a coherent set. Now, photographers are tweaking their images and introducing new problems to solve; blown highlights, over-saturated colours etc. Enhancing images is great fun; putting right technical errors is a P in the A. Although I am a commercial retoucher I marvel at the magic produced by the photo restorers on this forum; they work with truly awful originals and what they output makes a difference to people.
I agree, the company I work for was just rebranded, at a great cost, however, the photographers didn't seem to get the memo. Having to make lifestyle images not shot to look like a family look cohesive can be a challenge. I also retouch a lot of product shots where the products are not "golden samples," and our retouchers have to be able to perform complex image work to compensate for major imperfections in product samples. What is really interesting is that we have gone to renderings to get the product out there ahead of the competitors. Even though we still have to tweak the renders to make them look more photographic.

Last edited by Nanls; 10-09-2012 at 08:17 AM.
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  #16  
Old 10-09-2012, 10:59 AM
steenstry steenstry is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

Jon10, that is sensible but IMHO not entirely necessary... You can work in RGB and preview in CMYK simultaneously. In the "view" pulldown menu- proofing setup...

The advantage of your way is that you are certain to get what you see. However, working in RGB and previewing in CMYK is also perfectly accurate, and enables you to take advantage of RGB's wider gamut.
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  #17  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:43 AM
Jon10 Jon10 is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

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Originally Posted by steenstry View Post
Jon10, that is sensible but IMHO not entirely necessary... You can work in RGB and preview in CMYK simultaneously. In the "view" pulldown menu- proofing setup...

The advantage of your way is that you are certain to get what you see. However, working in RGB and previewing in CMYK is also perfectly accurate, and enables you to take advantage of RGB's wider gamut.
I understand regarding proofing colours in the view menu, but I'm not entirely sure what the advantages are of RGB's wider gamut - I realise that you have a wider range of colour information available, but if you know that your image is destined for 4-colour print, does that extra amount of colour info give you any kind of advantage since you will eventually have to discard it to convert to CMYK?

I'm from a print artwork background so I've not really had much experience of working in RGB - does it simply help to allow for a greater variety of end uses of the file, where RGB may be appropriate (web, film etc) or to allow the printer to exercise a greater degree of control when applying their own colour profiles and converting to CMYK? I suspect I may be missing something by not coming from more of a photographic background so any help would be gratefully received.
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  #18  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:53 AM
steenstry steenstry is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

Right on, Jon10... The wider gamut allows the printer more flexibility, but there are even better reasons... The color-related tools within photoshop behave very differently in RGB. Try the same file both ways and play around with hue/saturation, for example. You'll find the wider gamut behaves differently. If you're accustomed to CMYK, you'll be shocked at the huge changes you can make to the color without breaking up tone.
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  #19  
Old 10-09-2012, 12:54 PM
Jon10 Jon10 is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

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Originally Posted by steenstry View Post
Right on, Jon10... The wider gamut allows the printer more flexibility, but there are even better reasons... The color-related tools within photoshop behave very differently in RGB. Try the same file both ways and play around with hue/saturation, for example. You'll find the wider gamut behaves differently. If you're accustomed to CMYK, you'll be shocked at the huge changes you can make to the color without breaking up tone.
Aha!!! That's great - I'm starting to understand now - thanks very much for the feedback.
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  #20  
Old 10-09-2012, 02:29 PM
Shoku Shoku is offline
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Re: Question for the pro retouchers

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Originally Posted by Jon10 View Post
I find this interesting - as an artworker I would always try to work in CMYK from the outset to ensure that the colours I'm working with are achievable in print.

Do you ever find that in some cases the switch to RGB causes undesirable colour shifts that might require you to go back and adjust colour corrections? When colour correcting would it be worth carrying out regular test switches to CMYK just to check that there will be no nasty surprises?
You should always have the final output in mind when retouching, for best results. If possible you should get CMYK profiles from the printer and work toward their color space. If that is not possible still work toward CMYK, (either G7, SWOP, or whatever standard is common for your area). Sending RGB files to a printer without knowing what they will do with them is asking for less than accurate results.
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