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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Trade secrets.

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  #41  
Old 01-18-2013, 07:33 AM
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Benny Profane Benny Profane is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oneredpanther View Post
At its most basic, frequency separation is a technique that allows you to access and modify the underlying smoothness and tone of the skin, without touching the fine structure and detail of the pores.

In other words, it's a method of temporarily isolating the top layers of skin whilst still being able to work on the ones underneath. Used correctly it can vastly streamline the process of evening skin tones in the early stages of cleanup.
Sorry, still don't get it. Maybe it's me. I have a sort of high pass layer sitting on top of a blurred layer. Fine. Now what? Which layer is to be worked on? with what technique? I read something about using the healing brush on the top layer, but, you can't do that.
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  #42  
Old 01-18-2013, 11:42 AM
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0lBaldy 0lBaldy is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Frequency Separation Techniques for Portrait Photographers Long but very comprehensive so even I can understand the concept and advantages ... If you can last the hour and thirteen minuets then you will have a good grasp on how to use Frequency Separation and how to edit on BOTH the high and low frequency layers
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  #43  
Old 01-18-2013, 12:15 PM
RobertGarcia RobertGarcia is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

f.y.i. Frequency Separation is not really used by real pros (from my experience anyhow) its more of a forum thing it seems you can do the same thing with clone/heal/d&b. With that said, I have it as an action if I ever need it I used it once for clothes and it was good. Once you got a grasp of the cloning/d&b/healing you will find it unnecessary.
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  #44  
Old 01-18-2013, 01:08 PM
eraanexact eraanexact is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

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Originally Posted by RobertGarcia View Post
f.y.i. Frequency Separation is not really used by real pros (from my experience anyhow) its more of a forum thing it seems you can do the same thing with clone/heal/d&b. With that said, I have it as an action if I ever need it I used it once for clothes and it was good. Once you got a grasp of the cloning/d&b/healing you will find it unnecessary.
Yes, agreed.
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  #45  
Old 01-19-2013, 06:56 AM
edgework edgework is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Two immediate advantages with frequency separation:

• If you use the healing brush, and curse it every time you edge too close to an area of dramatically different value or color and produce a blurry mess, healing only on the top, hi-freq layer will eliminate that problem

• If you have uneven color over an area (i.e. red blotchiness, or uneven transitions in skin tones), a layer between the low and hi-freq layers will allow you to paint color without affecting the texture and detail. Turn off the hi-freq layer and just smooth out the low-freq tones with a paint brush, as desired.

neither of these techniques can be accomplished with a normal image and "standard" retouching or color techniques.

Additional blurring of the low frequency layer, while keeping the original hi-frequency texture layer, will mute the hi and low tones. Used judiciously, it makes for smoother transitions. Abused, it makes for an image that causes eveyone to say "Oh, you used hi-pass blurring" and not in a complementary way.

It's a tool, not a magic button.

Last edited by edgework; 01-19-2013 at 07:02 AM.
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  #46  
Old 01-19-2013, 08:21 AM
RobertGarcia RobertGarcia is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edgework View Post
Two immediate advantages with frequency separation:

• If you use the healing brush, and curse it every time you edge too close to an area of dramatically different value or color and produce a blurry mess, healing only on the top, hi-freq layer will eliminate that problem

• If you have uneven color over an area (i.e. red blotchiness, or uneven transitions in skin tones), a layer between the low and hi-freq layers will allow you to paint color without affecting the texture and detail. Turn off the hi-freq layer and just smooth out the low-freq tones with a paint brush, as desired.

neither of these techniques can be accomplished with a normal image and "standard" retouching or color techniques.

Additional blurring of the low frequency layer, while keeping the original hi-frequency texture layer, will mute the hi and low tones. Used judiciously, it makes for smoother transitions. Abused, it makes for an image that causes eveyone to say "Oh, you used hi-pass blurring" and not in a complementary way.

It's a tool, not a magic button.
Yes, this is true if you don't know what your doing and you need it for skin go right ahead but if you really know how to use the healing brush, clone and d&b you won't need to use it. Check out the webinars with Tarantino, Beene and Dresser don't kid yourself into thinking it is necessary. It's great for beginners or those who don't have the time to really learn the tools. Step into a retouching house and see them work you will amazed at the simplicity, speed and results.
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  #47  
Old 01-19-2013, 09:47 AM
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AKMac AKMac is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Frequency separation can be used well, badly or not at all. Personally, I would strongly recommend learning how to use it well.

www.akmacretouch.com
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  #48  
Old 01-19-2013, 09:54 AM
RobertGarcia RobertGarcia is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Yes, if that if part of your work flow go right ahead but not necessary and I haven't seen used in any official retouching house or any really good retoucher I know of. I am sure you can get great results no question but not necessary. I would recommend learning your brushes when to use what and blend modes for them including the various opacities. That is the key and practice : )
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  #49  
Old 01-19-2013, 10:02 AM
Gratin Gratin is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oneredpanther View Post
At its most basic, frequency separation is a technique that allows you to access and modify the underlying smoothness and tone of the skin, without touching the fine structure and detail of the pores.

In other words, it's a method of temporarily isolating the top layers of skin whilst still being able to work on the ones underneath. Used correctly it can vastly streamline the process of evening skin tones in the early stages of cleanup.

I would say that Frequency Separation and Dodge & Burn together form the twin pillars that are the foundation of skinwork. You'll need to know both. One without the other is half an army.
Sorry I missed this one earlier. I wholeheartedly disagree with this. You can work without one for skin, and it's not D&B. It's certainly not an 'industry standard' technique like D&B is. Sporadically used perhaps, but certainly not a mainstay in my experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edgework View Post
Two immediate advantages with frequency separation:

• If you use the healing brush, and curse it every time you edge too close to an area of dramatically different value or color and produce a blurry mess, healing only on the top, hi-freq layer will eliminate that problem

• If you have uneven color over an area (i.e. red blotchiness, or uneven transitions in skin tones), a layer between the low and hi-freq layers will allow you to paint color without affecting the texture and detail. Turn off the hi-freq layer and just smooth out the low-freq tones with a paint brush, as desired.

neither of these techniques can be accomplished with a normal image and "standard" retouching or color techniques.


Additional blurring of the low frequency layer, while keeping the original hi-frequency texture layer, will mute the hi and low tones. Used judiciously, it makes for smoother transitions. Abused, it makes for an image that causes eveyone to say "Oh, you used hi-pass blurring" and not in a complementary way.

It's a tool, not a magic button.
Interesting problems to highlight the advantages of FreQ Sep but none that can't and aren't overcome on a daily basis without it. You can fix both of those problems with nothing but Curves.
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  #50  
Old 01-19-2013, 10:09 AM
RobertGarcia RobertGarcia is offline
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Re: Trade secrets.

Hey, your giving out trade secrets!!! Let it remain complicated, lol.
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