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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Are we allowed to...

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  #11  
Old 01-21-2013, 10:32 PM
Casey Johnson Casey Johnson is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

Before and after with my typical contrast adjustment with a hint of warming. I haven't done any retouching to the face yet in this one. Anyone interested showing me what they would rather do?
http://i1107.photobucket.com/albums/...ps742c6a80.jpg
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  #12  
Old 01-22-2013, 01:01 AM
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AKMac AKMac is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

I might have remembered wrongly. I thought, in the first one you posted, the face and the body had been treated differently. Anyway, that doesn't matter now. I actually far prefer the SOOC shot that you've posted.
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  #13  
Old 01-22-2013, 01:08 AM
kav kav is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey Johnson View Post
Once again I am confused. I haven't don't any modifying. I also didn't do anything the the eyes. She wore very blue contacts. Here is the picture sooc.
http://i1107.photobucket.com/albums/...psb35dd43a.jpg
I actually like it closer to the original. You appear to have added a bit of contrast, and the lips may have picked it up slightly too much. The eyes looked kind of fake, but that was apparently due to the contacts. The color of her body could definitely use some balancing. I think it's just that I dislike the contacts and makeup, not so much the way you shot it. Balancing out the color of the body should be easy. I felt like it was going too much toward a fake tan look. Look at the shadow transitions where it starts to go kind of orange. I think that's an artifact of a curves adjustment.
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  #14  
Old 01-22-2013, 01:14 PM
Casey Johnson Casey Johnson is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

So do you suggest a better way of adding contrast? When using curves, I always pick up too much warmth in the shadows. I'm not a retoucher. I'm a photographer. So I hate the retouching part. lol So how do you add contrast without getting color shifts?
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  #15  
Old 01-22-2013, 02:19 PM
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AKMac AKMac is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

The usual way is to change the mode of the adjustment layer from Normal to Luminosity.
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  #16  
Old 01-22-2013, 09:54 PM
Casey Johnson Casey Johnson is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

And then what? You are talking to a guy who doesn't use much photoshop. Just dodging and burning using adjustment layers.
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  #17  
Old 01-23-2013, 12:08 AM
kav kav is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKMac View Post
The usual way is to change the mode of the adjustment layer from Normal to Luminosity.
I've always gotten weird results that way, which is why I never use it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey Johnson View Post
And then what? You are talking to a guy who doesn't use much photoshop. Just dodging and burning using adjustment layers.
I go with whatever works. I do this stuff a lot like I'm painting. I'll do things like value tests where I'll paint swatches of color on a blank layer to see how I like one color against another if I'm having trouble deciding. If something like curves is generating weird behavior, I back off on it as a global adjustment and just paint in things as I want them. I can mask and paint quite accurately, which helps. I was looking at her body. It was further off from her face than I'd like in the beginning. That can be makeup, lighting, or just the complexion of the individual. The contrast isn't that bad. It might look flat, but that is partly an illusion. The white dress really isn't helping there. It's the brightest thing in the image and it exits off the bottom of the page. It's quite demanding, but there isn't much you can do about that. I don't think the midtones need much beyond color correction. Some of the highlights might be extended and softened slightly to give the impression of a broader light source, but this must be balanced against the eyes. It might allow them to stand up a bit more to that dress. The background is kind of grey and drab.

You may not be able to accomplish the desired look by turning a single knob, but in the future you might be able to compensate for this by handling some of these problems at the lighting and wardrobe stage, assuming that is feasible. I'm not looking at the set, so I have no idea how large it is, what you have available in equipment, or how much time it takes to put up and tear down. If that background is near her and you tried to adjust the lighting on it a bit, it might reflect too much light back onto her and toward the camera lens depending upon available flags and proximity. I get this. I'm just saying as it is, the things that would help the image work for me involve slightly more than brightening the lighter tones and darkening the others in equal amounts.

I also don't buy into overly specialized roles unless you're being paid a lot for them and can absorb the cost of splitting them up. If your job requires you to photograph and retouch, your best option is to pick up some drawing and painting fundamentals so that you become more used to manually shading and highlighting things directly and learn to mask ridiculously well. That way you can decide if something needs to be a tad brighter or darker. It doesn't solve everything. There are still plenty of problems. It's just that it grants you tools with greater refinement than global adjustments.

TLDR if you want simple photoshop you have to solve these problems as much as possible prior to post, where some lighting favors simpler adjustments to fine tune contrast. Skin variations are greatly emphasized by smaller lights and parallel light rays (such as those found in direct sun). The background being flat emphasizes this further. The bright dress makes her look darker. I wanted to avoid getting into projecting my own opinions on this. It's just it's a combination of things that I feel break synergy.

Last edited by kav; 01-23-2013 at 12:14 AM.
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  #18  
Old 01-23-2013, 09:38 AM
Casey Johnson Casey Johnson is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by kav View Post
I've always gotten weird results that way, which is why I never use it.



I go with whatever works. I do this stuff a lot like I'm painting. I'll do things like value tests where I'll paint swatches of color on a blank layer to see how I like one color against another if I'm having trouble deciding. If something like curves is generating weird behavior, I back off on it as a global adjustment and just paint in things as I want them. I can mask and paint quite accurately, which helps. I was looking at her body. It was further off from her face than I'd like in the beginning. That can be makeup, lighting, or just the complexion of the individual. The contrast isn't that bad. It might look flat, but that is partly an illusion. The white dress really isn't helping there. It's the brightest thing in the image and it exits off the bottom of the page. It's quite demanding, but there isn't much you can do about that. I don't think the midtones need much beyond color correction. Some of the highlights might be extended and softened slightly to give the impression of a broader light source, but this must be balanced against the eyes. It might allow them to stand up a bit more to that dress. The background is kind of grey and drab.

You may not be able to accomplish the desired look by turning a single knob, but in the future you might be able to compensate for this by handling some of these problems at the lighting and wardrobe stage, assuming that is feasible. I'm not looking at the set, so I have no idea how large it is, what you have available in equipment, or how much time it takes to put up and tear down. If that background is near her and you tried to adjust the lighting on it a bit, it might reflect too much light back onto her and toward the camera lens depending upon available flags and proximity. I get this. I'm just saying as it is, the things that would help the image work for me involve slightly more than brightening the lighter tones and darkening the others in equal amounts.

I also don't buy into overly specialized roles unless you're being paid a lot for them and can absorb the cost of splitting them up. If your job requires you to photograph and retouch, your best option is to pick up some drawing and painting fundamentals so that you become more used to manually shading and highlighting things directly and learn to mask ridiculously well. That way you can decide if something needs to be a tad brighter or darker. It doesn't solve everything. There are still plenty of problems. It's just that it grants you tools with greater refinement than global adjustments.

TLDR if you want simple photoshop you have to solve these problems as much as possible prior to post, where some lighting favors simpler adjustments to fine tune contrast. Skin variations are greatly emphasized by smaller lights and parallel light rays (such as those found in direct sun). The background being flat emphasizes this further. The bright dress makes her look darker. I wanted to avoid getting into projecting my own opinions on this. It's just it's a combination of things that I feel break synergy.
Hey I think this is great advice. Where can I pick up on some of these basic shading fundamentals? Pimple popping and skin retouch is the easy part. But I want to learn fundamentals that will help give my images more of a 3D look.
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  #19  
Old 01-23-2013, 04:21 PM
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0lBaldy 0lBaldy is offline
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Re: Are we allowed to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey Johnson View Post
Before and after with my typical contrast adjustment with a hint of warming. I haven't done any retouching to the face yet in this one. Anyone interested showing me what they would rather do?
http://i1107.photobucket.com/albums/...ps742c6a80.jpg
Straightened image... a masked screen layer (for the face).... a masked multiply layer (for the dress and background) a masked hue/sat layer to mute the yellow in the background.. a tiny bit of cloning on dress, hair, forehead, shoulders... sharpened eye and lip highlights... brought the reds down a tiny bit with a masked hue/sat layer..

If you use Photoshop you can post fairly large pictures which are under 100k using the 'save for web' function in Photoshop as described here:
Size, Quality and/or Format your Attached Images.. (Click here)

How to attach Files/Images to your Posts or Threads:
(Click here)

If you want to post a larger resolution that is over 100K then you can host your image elsewhere and attach a link in the thread (as you did here), but also please attach an under 100K version (so the thread remains useful in the future, regardless of external links).

~~Original~ ~ My Version ~~
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC_0244_zpsb35dd43a.jpg (72.3 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg DSC_0244_zpsb35dd43a-OB.jpg (198.8 KB, 34 views)
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  #20  
Old 01-23-2013, 04:35 PM
Casey Johnson Casey Johnson is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 22
Re: Are we allowed to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 0lBaldy View Post
Straightened image... a masked screen layer (for the face).... a masked multiply layer (for the dress and background) a masked hue/sat layer to mute the yellow in the background.. a tiny bit of cloning on dress, hair, forehead, shoulders... sharpened eye and lip highlights... brought the reds down a tiny bit with a masked hue/sat layer..

If you use Photoshop you can post fairly large pictures which are under 100k using the 'save for web' function in Photoshop as described here:
Size, Quality and/or Format your Attached Images.. (Click here)

How to attach Files/Images to your Posts or Threads:
(Click here)

If you want to post a larger resolution that is over 100K then you can host your image elsewhere and attach a link in the thread (as you did here), but also please attach an under 100K version (so the thread remains useful in the future, regardless of external links).

~~Original~ ~ My Version ~~
Please tell me you are kidding...
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