RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Copying colors from a reference image for Gradient

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 10-19-2014, 01:25 PM
Aladdin's Avatar
Aladdin Aladdin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NJ/NY
Posts: 444
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

@AKMack & @skoobey: OK guys, show me with an example! a picture is worth a 1000 word.
Reply With Quote top
  #12  
Old 10-19-2014, 04:52 PM
skoobey skoobey is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,376
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

Look, I was wrong, I was doing things badly, because I focused on technique, rather than what image looks like in the end. You can do it the way he did it, and get a fabulous image, the problem is it's going to take forever.

There already is a tutorial for this by Pratik Naik, I can't find it now, but it was on youtube, comparing two settings, but the same couple, and how to make the color/tone/feel look good combined.

Sure, I'm planning on releasing a series of tutorials, anyway, but you'll have to wait a bit .

I'd say, start with looking at desaturated sample, and your image, once you get the tones right, you go for color. Global to local. It's quite simple really, just keep your goal in mind.
Reply With Quote top
  #13  
Old 10-19-2014, 05:45 PM
klev klev is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,109
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aladdin View Post
@AKMack & @skoobey: OK guys, show me with an example! a picture is worth a 1000 word.
That's actually the point where I would disagree with you when it comes to techniques such as this one. To make a video of something, it has to work on one image, whereas the things that are applied there do not generalize well. In that case he obtained an okay result where the face was not too flat. If the face was flatly lit, it would give you an effect that looks recolored rather than something that can almost pass for natural.

I actually consider this stuff quite a bit. One of the areas I've been looking at is what primitive operations on rgb vectors retain some stability between typical work spaces. I don't count prophoto, because it's terrible.
Reply With Quote top
  #14  
Old 10-19-2014, 07:14 PM
marameo's Avatar
marameo marameo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: The Eternal City
Posts: 160
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

Quote:
Originally Posted by insmac View Post
The main issue is the colour grading from the photos you've linked can be traced back to a lot of selective adjustments, it's not an overall mapping that does the trick.
What if thera are not selective adjustments, like in those picture with positive color film? Is it possible to do an overall mapping and copy the colors?

http://www.solosapere.it/images/chia...6zvo1_1280.jpg

http://www.streetphotographyinthewor...014/05/due.jpg

http://calle35.com/wp-content/upload...owitz_1974.jpg
Reply With Quote top
  #15  
Old 10-19-2014, 09:09 PM
skoobey skoobey is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,376
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

Oh, there are local adjustments. Even then there were adjustments. What you see in galleries and magazines, even when analog, was retouched by printers, with DNB, multiple prints for color, contrast etc.
Reply With Quote top
  #16  
Old 10-20-2014, 02:40 PM
insmac insmac is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 190
Re: Copying colors from a reference image for Grad

First thing first, each negative/positive has it's own 'signature look' whereas most of the dslr cameras output gives more or less neutral look, certainly they don't have any intended hue shifts or significant contrast differencies. There are exceptions (like a bw-only Leica M-Monochrom) but the thing is, you take an average camera from every major manufacturer, take the same shot in the same setting and you'll have pretty much comparable pictures, whereas you'd get three different images shot on film.

Now with these examples you have rather cold, greenish highlights and hue shifts in shadows, there are not "natural" as they would be straight from a DSLR camera, you can tell from a mile they're shot on film.

That's why I laugh in the face of people bragging about how bad photographers are if with a camera that good their output still needs retouching.

I'll give you an example. Last month I've received studio beauty shots taken on a medium-format Kodak Portra 160 negative. This is Kodak's brand new, freshly developed material for improved accuracy and reduced grain. All the images were shot on a tripod, in a controlled environment with a properly metered exposure. Result? All have different color shifts. They look beatiful, "organic" so to speak, but they certainly need correction.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Resizing images for RetouchPRO jeaniesa Photo Retouching 19 11-05-2016 09:28 PM
Image critique and feedback voidsource Critiques 0 06-25-2013 01:56 PM
Dufaycolor - scanning, restoring, archiving e2b History, Conservation, and Repair 2 06-25-2012 05:38 AM
Damaged image from a dying digital camera Filippo Photo Restoration 6 01-14-2011 02:53 AM
maintaining image size in photoshop 6 when copying to a new image Chris W. Software 9 09-08-2001 10:27 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved