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new db technique

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  #41  
Old 02-12-2016, 02:18 AM
klev klev is offline
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Re: new db technique

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Originally Posted by marameo View Post
Is the old 50% gray overlay/softlight layer + opacity adjustment the best way to apply grain yet?
Skoobey might not like this one, but I think 1-3% gaussian noise works well enough given one of those blending modes. I don't really think of it as grain. If it looks too smooth, that's a good way to fix it. This happens when the noise is low and the change between neighboring pixel values is small.

I don't really like to use it if I can avoid it. It signifies that something is a little off to me and this is a cheap fix. It can look okay though.
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  #42  
Old 02-12-2016, 04:42 AM
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marameo marameo is offline
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Re: new db technique

I forgot to mention the blending options in 50% overlay to move the black slider in the underlying layer also.

Is "monochromatic" your kind of thing when it comes to gaussian noise?

This is the approach I have found almost everywhere on the web and I assume is way off and misleading.
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  #43  
Old 02-12-2016, 05:23 AM
skoobey skoobey is offline
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Re: new db technique

I like the noise, noise is what's put's the image together, and can even make things look sharper.

For example image might be 8000 pixels wide, but there is almost never detail represented in the single pixel, it's always spread across the neighboring pixels(because pixels are square and the world is not) and then it's the noise that ties it all up, especially in the shadows where there is less detail.

Monochromatic is a must unless you want a special effect.

Layer>New Layer>Blending mode"soft light, linear light, overlay", check the "fill with 50% gray>Filter>Noise>Add Noise>Gaussian, monochromatic
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  #44  
Old 02-12-2016, 08:54 AM
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marameo marameo is offline
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Re: new db technique

I understand that noise as well as other retoching techniques will be affected by image resizing at the moment of the saving, correct?

If this is it, should I apply noise after resizing?
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  #45  
Old 02-12-2016, 09:21 AM
skoobey skoobey is offline
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Re: new db technique

Yes and no. I most often don't. Ask yourself why are you adding noise? If it's to unify the file or portion of it as you see it (and you must be looking at it at different zoom levels). If it still gave you the result you wanted and you're looking at the file at different zoom levels, you just save as is.

And you can always want a noisy image, it's all about creativity, so i guess you could add noise after resize then.
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  #46  
Old 02-12-2016, 11:54 AM
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marameo marameo is offline
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Re: new db technique

I ran across digital powder concept and was wondering what pro retouchers take is on it.

I am not seeing it as a replacement for the dnb, healing and cloning works that normally needs to be done on skin. Yet, there might be barely blotches on arms and legs and also sometimes on the cheeks that are kind of too subtle to dnb very successfully. Also, digital powder - the way I understand it - keeps the skin really sharp and lets the texture thru while tightening the pours of the skin and retaining the highlights.

Thanks
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  #47  
Old 02-12-2016, 12:19 PM
skoobey skoobey is offline
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Re: new db technique

If you're referring to the naming that Gry Garness used, it's really an inverted high pass + blur 1/3 technique. It is a shortcut, and has nothing to do with powder, but rather makes the skin(or whatever) appear smoother.

What id does is it blurs and leaves texture on top. It looks exactly like what it does=it looks like a blurred image with texture on top. You notice Gry only uses it sporadically and at less than 100%...

There is NOTHING to subtle to "DNB" successfully. I DNB to pore lever, single hair level if needed. I have to be frank here. Retouching is a manual thing(and so is color grading for that matter).

You need to know what the goal is. These kind of methods will only confuse you.
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  #48  
Old 02-12-2016, 08:33 PM
klev klev is offline
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Re: new db technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by marameo View Post
I forgot to mention the blending options in 50% overlay to move the black slider in the underlying layer also.

Is "monochromatic" your kind of thing when it comes to gaussian noise?

This is the approach I have found almost everywhere on the web and I assume is way off and misleading.
Yeah I use monochromatic noise when I do use it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marameo View Post
I understand that noise as well as other retoching techniques will be affected by image resizing at the moment of the saving, correct?

If this is it, should I apply noise after resizing?
That is a good question. I would have mentioned that if I thought of it.

Retouching relates to scale. If the scale of the noise layer looks too large relative to the image, it will look weird. I don't resize image before applying noise if I intend to apply it. I just make sure I have the scale as I want it relative to the image. If I needed to, I would make a noise layer and a different scale and resize that.

There are of course different types of noise, and designing a good algorithm is quite complicated. For example Perlin's algorithm relied on a pseudo-random function and the estimated rate of change of that function at sampled points. There are other brownian noise functions as well. In photoshop I just use gaussian noise, because it's enough to make things feel a little less flat.
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  #49  
Old 02-29-2016, 08:13 AM
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marameo marameo is offline
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Re: new db technique

I have noticed a retoucher that does the frequency separation before the actual dnb. It's not the usual healing on the high pass and blur on the low pass. Instead, a blank layer is put between those two pass layers and the retoucher continuously samples and paints to smooth out the tonal transition of the skin.

Is it helpful before getting down to dnb?

Thanks
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  #50  
Old 02-29-2016, 08:57 AM
Bettelyoun Bettelyoun is offline
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Re: new db technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by marameo View Post
I have noticed a retoucher that does the frequency separation before the actual dnb. It's not the usual healing on the high pass and blur on the low pass. Instead, a blank layer is put between those two pass layers and the retoucher continuously samples and paints to smooth out the tonal transition of the skin.

Is it helpful before getting down to dnb?

Thanks
I know a few people who will say that is Filtering the Skin. Just Heal/Clone on Lighten and Darken mode then Dodge and Burn.
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