RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-17-2017, 08:25 AM
aaronspe aaronspe is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2
Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

Does anyone have any experience rebuilding flesh via channel mixer and curves. While achieving mid-tones is simple, I'm having a difficult time coming up with an adjustment that creates a realistic 3/4 and shadow. Usually, it just seem dirty or not rich in color. In general, the process is to choose the nicest channel and use that one with an adjustment curve on top. I'm trying to keep adjustments layers to a minimum.

Any help appreciated,
Aaron
Reply With Quote top
  #2  
Old 04-17-2017, 03:09 PM
skoobey skoobey is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,358
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

I know what you mean, especially in darker skin tones, you get that more saturated portion of the transitional area between shadow and mid tone.

I don't know what the issue with the image was, but you can use luminosity sliders or luminosity masks? I would go that route in order to lessen the manual work.
Reply With Quote top
  #3  
Old 04-17-2017, 04:57 PM
klev klev is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,106
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

What do you mean rebuilding? You might need more than one adjustment. Generally you want to keep it as simple as possible, but the typical color spaces used to encode still imagery are not conducive to what I think you're trying to do. If it doesn't work, make secondary layers wherever you have problems. Use masks. I find that I can set 1-2 points on a curve without messing anything up, but that's typically my limit as I am sampling by visual inspection. Even using the eyedroppers, a single image from the scene may not provide sufficient samples to justify a more complex adjustment.

If you have way too much saturation, it's usually a sign that you're overdoing something.
Reply With Quote top
  #4  
Old 04-20-2017, 03:56 AM
Damo77's Avatar
Damo77 Damo77 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 210
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

May we see what you're working on?
Reply With Quote top
  #5  
Old 04-26-2017, 05:50 AM
anderson234 anderson234 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 25
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

What do you mean by "3/4 and shadow"? If you mean shadow, it's just not right "rich in color". You may want to desaturate in the shadow area, instead.
Reply With Quote top
  #6  
Old 04-29-2017, 08:03 AM
aaronspe aaronspe is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

I meant the shadow areas in regard to skin, (under the chin, sides of arms, etc.) In general, I haven't been able to come up with an adjustment set that would give pleasing, realistic color for lighter, mids, and darker areas. I would like to keep masking out of it, or at the very least only use the RGB channels as they are, no adjusting. I think I'm happier with the results just using the monochrome option rather than wholly replacing the r and b channels with the g channel.

examples: In the below I was able to pull the 0 point of the R up to get rid of the green cast in the darker areas, but that doesn't always work as it changes the balance of the lighter areas. Oh well.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2...2RTeVhFMGwybUU

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2...0tPZnNkc2tnWUE
Reply With Quote top
  #7  
Old 04-29-2017, 12:05 PM
klev klev is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,106
Re: Rebuilding Flesh via Channel Mix

This isn't that bad, and a lot of people regularly have to deal with this kind of thing. I would probably just make one adjustment layer for the overall thing, then add another on top of that with a soft mask to deal with some of the darker areas. This means the darker areas are adjusted twice. This is because masking off one region exclusive of the other will lead to weird transitions. It might be as much as one layer per dark or off color region. If you're dealing with tiny splotches that are closer to noise than a region of the image, you can get away with cloning in color mode.

It's often not really possible to get everything perfect in one pass, but I don't see any reason why you wouldn't be able to take this to a finished image with respectable results. Good luck.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Technique > Photo Retouching


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fixing Glasses glare with channel curtistealer Photo Retouching 1 08-19-2015 11:43 PM
Frequency separation via channel mixer Der_W Software 2 06-12-2012 11:38 AM
Tutorial 05: Converting a Color Image to Black and White grayscale BW DannyRaphael Photo-Art 101 17 05-22-2011 04:55 PM
Channel Mixer T Paul Scratch Pad 2 01-15-2004 08:48 PM
Nondestructive Channel Operations Andrew B. Photo Restoration 6 01-15-2003 09:44 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved