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Photo Retouching "Improving" photos, post-production, correction, etc.

Total Ink for color correction in PS

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  #11  
Old 08-23-2003, 04:26 PM
Kevin Connery's Avatar
Kevin Connery Kevin Connery is offline
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Scott is an excellent speaker, organizer, and instructor.

Unfortunately, some of his advice is flawed, and is based on some specific conditions that he either forgets are in place or neglects to mention. This is one of those cases.

I don't recommend any of his books for three reasons: the above, his tendency to provide recipes to solve individual problems without explaining how or why they work, and his tendency to use 'tricks' that don't scale--they can't readily be expanded beyond the one situation.

That approach simply gives the reader another set of recipes to remember, without providing the structure to help them put the parts together and make a larger whole--or to use them in a larger context.

And, of course, sometimes it's not good advice for the reader, who may not have the same setup as he's expecting. Since there's no explanations, it's "voodoo gone bad" when it doesn't work.

His tip books will get a new Photoshop user up to (to use a car analogy) 10-15 miles per hour, which is all some people need or want. To get past that, though, you'll have to pretty much stop and start over--the tips won't let you go any faster.
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Old 08-23-2003, 09:53 PM
TheTexan TheTexan is offline
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Kevin is right. Total ink is a CMYK animal. Since CMYK involves the addition of physical inks to create a pallete unlike RGB which uses the mixing of lights to create colors. Total ink numbers are used only (in the strictest sense) with CMYK. Printers with presses are concerned with the total amount of ink involved to create their colors. The SWOP standard is 300. This is a industry mandated standard. In other words the totals of all CMYK ink percentages should not exceed 300%. Any color that can be created using CMYK can be done so using combinations that equal to less than 300 so anything above is overkill and should not be used. RGB is a different animal since no matter what you create with RGB regardless of numbers (ie, 245,233,200) that RGB color can be duplicated as a 300 or less CMYK equivalent (within, of course, the limitations of the gamut envelope) and is done so automatically when you print to a RGB desktop printer. If you print to a CMYK printer and/or work in the CMYK workspace and/or do your own separations then you take upon yourself the responsibility of remaining within the 300 limit.

For the absolute authority on this subject see 'Professional Photoshop, the classic guide to color correction' by Dan Margulis, ISBN 0-7645-3695-8. I consider this one book the only indispensible book I have among the other 30 Photoshop books.

Tex
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