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Pro Photographers?

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  #1  
Old 03-28-2006, 10:58 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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Pro Photographers?

Hey ya'll! Does anyone know of a site or forum in which pro photographers are actualy willing to help not-so-pro photographers learn the trade (You know. like RetouchPro but for photographer - or even something half as great as this site)? Or, even better, anyone here willing to learn me a thing or two? lol I really need some help here, I just feel so lost. I can read and read til I am blue in the face, and aperture and film speed and shutter speed, if there is even a difference, ugh - I am clueless! It all swims around my brain like I have no file to put it in. I just want to increase my technical knowledge of photography - film and digital, even just a little bit. Thanks everybody!

Dawn
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Old 03-28-2006, 11:24 PM
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mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Hi Dawn, try http://www.photosig.com
A basic membership is free. You can post your work and get critiques or you can read all the critiques of others. There are some really seasoned pro's - digital and film users. Click on the User tab and look at the work of users like Wildphoto and Timecatcher and many others.
Regards, Murray
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  #3  
Old 03-29-2006, 06:54 AM
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shellby shellby is offline
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Digital Photography Review

www.dpreview.com

www.ephotozine.co.uk

www.photographers.co.uk
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Old 03-29-2006, 06:59 AM
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Cameraken Cameraken is offline
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Hi Dawn

See if this helps a little.

All this applies to film and digital

Film speed
When you buy a film it has a ISO (ASA,DIN) rating. This is the sensitivity of the emulsion (amount of silver). The camera meter needs to know this to give correct exposure readings. Most cameras and films are DX coded. This means that they can ‘talk’ to each other and set the film speed automatically. Many digital cameras also have a ISO setting which controls the sensitivity of the CCD in the same way.

Exposure.
This is the amount of light that hits the film or sensor. The amount of light is controlled by altering the shutter speed and/or the aperture.

Shutter speed.
This is (usually) a blind in the camera that exposes the film by exposing the film via a slit or gap between two blinds. The slit passes over the film at a constant rate to expose the film evenly. The bigger this slit is, the more light hits the film (or sensor)
So a shutter speed of 30th second would create a larger slit than a shutter speed of 1000th sec.

Aperture
The aperture is located in the lens. It works like the iris in the eye. This iris can be opened to let in more light or closed to let in less light. The aperture numbers (F Nos.) control the size of this aperture. F2.8 creates a large hole in the iris while f16 creates a small hole.

Exposure of the film is controlled by correctly setting the shutter speed and aperture combination.
On a bright day you may get a meter reading of 125th Second at f11
So the camera would be set at 125th on the shutter speed dial and f11 on the aperture.
However a faster shutter speed with a bigger aperture would give exactly the same exposure.
So
125th at f11 is exactly the same exposure as 60th at f22 which is exactly the same as 250th at f8.

Why would you want to alter these numbers?

Depth of field.
The smaller the aperture, the greater the depth of field. So the aperture determines the amount of focus (most good cameras have a depth of field preview)
F22 will give more in focus than f2.8

However, as mentioned. f22 will require a longer exposure time than f2.8 So depending on the available light a tripod may be required to hold the camera still at f22

Conversely.
If taking pictures of fast moving objects then a fast shutter speed is required to ‘freeze’ the action. So. If the light is reading 125th at f5.6 then to freeze action the shutter speed could be moved up to 500th (2 stops) but the aperture would have to be moved down by the same 2 stops to keep the same exposure ie from f5.6 to f2.8.



Hope this helps. Any questions?

Ken.
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Old 03-29-2006, 11:01 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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Thank you all so much. I am loking in to the links. However...

Ken, I think I have found exactly what I need here -lol. Thank you so much. And yes if you do not mind I have a question or two.

As far as depth of field goes, is the depth the same when set to a specific number regardless of the other settings? Like will F2.8 blur past a certain distance regardless of everythign else? And if so where do I find these distances?

Also, do I need to get a light meter to tell me in the beginning what I should set the camera on? One to tell me it would be 125th at f5.6 etc.?

"If the light is reading 125th at f5.6 then to freeze action the shutter speed could be moved up to 500th (2 stops) but the aperture would have to be moved down by the same 2 stops to keep the same exposure ie from f5.6 to f2.8." - Is this 2 stops forumla always the same regardless of the light reading? Also, where does the film speed come into play with this? Now, mind you, my new digital is not an SLR, but it was the closest I felt I could get without selling a kidney. I do have a film SLR, without a flash. but anyways, the camera has ISO from 80 to 400, 400 almost pointless because of the noise, but I guess if push came to shove there is always neat image.

I coudl probably go on like this for days, pickign your brain. I will stop here and try to only pick one hemisphere at a time (if its okay with you that is).

Thanks so very much!

Dawn
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Old 03-30-2006, 05:23 AM
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kstein kstein is offline
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http://www.morguefile.com/archive/cl...m.php?lesson=1

http://www.photovisionmagazine.com/articles/index.html

http://www.sederquist.com/photoweb.html
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  #7  
Old 03-30-2006, 08:07 AM
imagepoint imagepoint is offline
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Here is a simple way of thinking about depth of field. Larger F-numbers gives and greater depth of field. F16 has more depth of field than f2.8
Shorter focal lengths give greater depth of field. Meaning a wide angle lens has a greater depth of field than a long (telephoto) lens.
Greater the subject distance gives greater depth of field, instance if you use a macro lens and focus on a subject a few inches away you might end up with less than half inch depth of field, where as is you shoot a subject 10 feet away you will end up with approximately 10 feet in back and in front of the subject. This will depend on the focal length of your lens and your f-stop. The bigger the lens the smaller the depth of field and the larger the f-stop the more depth of field.
Depth of field is greater behind the subject than in front.
The lens you shoot with in combination with your f-stop will determine how much depth of field you have. SLR lenses have markings that assist in giving you approximate depth of field.

On your second question, if your light meter reads 125 at f5.6 then 500 at f2.8 is the same exposure. The shutter speed increase to 1/500 allows less light than 1/125, in this case four times less light or two stops. F2.8 allows four times more light or two stops than f5.6. So choosing your f-stop and shutter speed depends on what you want to do creatively.
Now film speed work like an f-stop, if for instance your exposure is 1/125 f5.6 using ISO 100, then ISO 200 is 1/125 f8 ISO 400 is 1/125 f11.
In other words if you double the film speed you double the light of the film's sensitivety. So 200 is double of 100, one stop. 300 is half the increase of 200, 1/2 a stop.
Attached Images
File Type: gif Depth-of-Field-Diagram.gif (7.2 KB, 21 views)
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Old 03-30-2006, 08:32 AM
smiley guy smiley guy is offline
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Hi 1STLITE,

I enjoy photography as well and have been using my Canon Rebel 2000 film SLR for about 2 1/2 years now. The biggest thing I found that helped me initially was to get my head out of the users manual and photography books and magazines and start shooting. Shoot, shoot, shoot and then shoot some more. Take notes (mental or on paper) of what you are doing with various settings and learn from those. You have a digital camera so there is no excuse like film processing costs or film costs to stop you from shooting. The forums will help you with critiquing your results etc. but get out there and shoot.

Carry your camera with you everywhere and take pictures of things that interest you. Go back and shoot those same subjects with different lighting at a different time of day. Don't discount the various settings on your camera like you mentioned with 400ASA, just know when and how to use them. Don't bail on your film SLR either. Digital is not the be all and end all. It is great for what you want to do now which is learn how various things work with photography but keep working with the film camera to try things with that to see what is different/same better/worse. Film is not dead despite what you may read in the various media.

Enjoy photography and get out of it what you want to get out of it. Keep reading, don't get me wrong, but also get out there and shoot, shoot, shoot!!
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Old 03-30-2006, 08:52 AM
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Cameraken Cameraken is offline
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Hi Dawn


Quote:
is the depth the same when set to a specific number regardless of the other settings
With a fixed lens, Yes. But when using a zoom lens the depth of field would alter with the focal length. For example if your camera has a 35 – 105 zoom attached then a focal length of 35mm at f2.8 would give more depth of field than 105mm at f2.8.
(Other attachments may also alter this. Extension tubes, Close Up filters etc)

Quote:
And if so where do I find these distances?
They are (usually) written on the lens itself on an SLR. There is a scale showing what will be in focus at a particular aperture. The camera may also have a ‘Depth of Field’ button/lever which shows what will be in focus. These figures are usually in the handbook as well. You will find tables on the net also,

Quote:
do I need to get a light meter
The internal meter is the easiest as it reads directly through the lens, so it takes into account the zoom setting, ambient light and any filters automatically.
A separate hand held meter is more versatile. Incident light readings, Spot metering, Zoning. Etc. However a beginner could make more mistakes.

Quote:
is this 2 stops forumla always the same regardless of the light reading
Yes. Lets say the ambient light is reading 125th at f5.6
Setting the camera to 125th at f8 would result in a dark picture
Setting the camera to 125th at f4 would result in a light picture
The relationship between shutter speed and aperture needs to be kept constant for the ambient light available.
So if you make the iris bigger (aperture f4) then more light would hit the film and overexpose the picture so you have to make the shutter speed faster to compensate. Changing the shutter speed to 250th (in this case) would give correct exposure.
One stop up on one needs one stop down on the other.

Quote:
where does the film speed come into play with this
This is where film and digital can differ. With film, once you put a film in the camera then you set the ISO (ASA) and you don’t touch it again until the film is finished.
With digital you could alter the ISO (Sensitivity) for every shot. A digital camera meter would take these changes into account for you (like DX coding) However if using a hand held meter then make sure the same ISO is set on the meter.

Quote:
if its okay with you that is
No Problem Dawn. Hope this helps.

Ken
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  #10  
Old 03-30-2006, 10:59 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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Thank you Ken. I very greatly appreciate your time and effort in helping me learn this. I think this is going to take a bit of study to totally understand. Mind if I call on you again in the future?

THank you so much for your help.

Dawn
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