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Lens to use and copy table

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  #11  
Old 06-26-2009, 01:44 PM
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Sweetlight Sweetlight is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

If you are going to make one from scratch you can use two tungsten hotlights, one on each side at about 45-degrees at the subject. I would suggest buying some polarizing film from the cam store or a theater supply. Shoot the lights through that. You also need a polarizing filter that will take any stray glare away. Shooting digital you probably wanna shoot in tungsten setting.

c
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  #12  
Old 06-26-2009, 01:54 PM
Mike Mike is online now
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

Quote:
Originally Posted by PixFixGuy View Post
Well, when shooting life the light is there, the contrast range is there, shape and color are there, it's a feast meant for a lens. Take that same lens and copy a photo or any flat art and not too pretty. It really isn't about pretty it's about duplicating. Remember, real life has big dynamic range but what your copying has a very short range by contrast (OK so I made a pun) so if you copy something with at most a dynamic range of 2.0 fix it in post. In the film days we printed it on a more contrasty paper to get some umph back, and soooo, the beat goes on.
When I did copy work on film, we picked a film/developer combination that would give us the result that we wanted. The dynamic range of the original (either a scene or a print that you want to copy) can easily be entered into a proper tone reproduction cycle that will indicate the expected result before you even click the shutter.

With digital files, it is even easier to adjust so that the output falls where you want it in comparison to the original.

I would suggest that if your results photographing something with a small dynamic range is not coming out well, show us some examples and we will all gather around and see if we can help.
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  #13  
Old 06-26-2009, 04:12 PM
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PixFixGuy PixFixGuy is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

Mike, we got a little off track. The message that quoted was me trying to explain why the is a difference between real life shooting and making a copy of a photo or whatever.....Oh, that was you........well, I do have it pretty much worked out and so do you. Your right about shooting with film, picked a exposure/dev combo for transparencies and the same for B/W film set to a #3 paper (+/–) but we are in the digital age, thank goodness, so it's much easer. Anyway, I'm OK, just trying to be helpful.
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  #14  
Old 06-26-2009, 04:18 PM
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Sweetlight Sweetlight is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

Is it me that keeps taking this stuff off track?? I swear I have mad cow, lyme disease or pig flu......
I am losing my mind
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  #15  
Old 06-26-2009, 08:37 PM
Mike Mike is online now
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

I will keep an eye out for your mind, but have seen very few running around here lately

I think this medium is designed to help one go off track. And I am not so sure that that is a bad thing. Very often one finds out more as the conversation wanders around than he would if it stayed on the straight and narrow.

Maybe the original poster could chime in with a critique of our comments. But maybe thats not really a good idea?????
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  #16  
Old 06-29-2009, 03:14 PM
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Southbay Southbay is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

FWIW, I do my makeshift copy stand work using Philips 5,000K CFs, from the local Home Depot. I light my work area with these as well, as they closely approximate daylight.
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  #17  
Old 06-29-2009, 05:02 PM
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PixFixGuy PixFixGuy is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

Hi;
When using those 5K CF lights, trust nobody. As a sorta self check do a white card balance anyway. Better safe than you know what. As for going off track, nothing new. If you study Talmud you discover that all those really smart guys 2500 years ago drifted off subject in their discussions on a regular basis (check out the Congressional Record). However they always got back to the point and came up with very good and modern stuff even by todays standards. Why should we be different. Now bcarll knows all that be needed to make good copies and why. Not so bad. Subject drift makes it fun.
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  #18  
Old 10-24-2009, 12:29 AM
Andrew Lawrence Andrew Lawrence is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

I always have problems shooting from overhead, you have to be so close and use such a wide angle that it distorts the image and makes it really hard to get the edges straight and parallel (it gets worse the larger the photo.)

Professionally you want to shoot with a longer lens, it helps so much with distortion but also with the lighting (look up family of angles with reflection) basically imagine if the image your copying is a mirror, the closer you are to the mirror with a wider lens the more you will be able to see the entire room including your lighting reflecting in the mirror. The farther you are with a longer lens the less you will see the whole room and lighting (if placed with two lights at 45 degree angles, the farther off to the sides of the work the lights are the less chance they have of showing up in your photo as a direct reflection) again look up family of angles with lighting. I don't know if this makes much scene, but just look at a mirror through a viewfinder and see how you can see much more of the room in the selection when you are close to the mirror as opposed to when you are farther back and zoomed in.

If you are too close you will get whats called direct reflection of your lighting (just think of glare in your TV) that will mess up your copy. From over head I always have to get a ladder which isn't easy to set up and constantly be climbing down and up making adjustments with. So I place the work on a plywood board or something and prop it up at like 45 degree angle and set the camera far away facing down at a 45 degree angle...

A copy table is likely a table with 2 or 4 lights attached by arms that are connected to the table that are off to the side out of the family of angles with a tripod like thing also connected to the table that hold the camera above the photo.

Make sure you use a gray card/color checker to match colors.
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  #19  
Old 10-24-2009, 05:18 PM
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

For what good this will do, here goes. I like using longer lens and lighting set at a lower angle than 45 degrees to get things lit flatter. I also use a polarizing filter to help prevent glare. That does help. If you don't have a copy-stand, a tripod with a horizontal arm that would allow you to point the camera straight down is a nifty thing. Have fun.
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  #20  
Old 10-25-2009, 01:14 PM
Andrew Lawrence Andrew Lawrence is offline
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Re: Lens to use and copy table

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Originally Posted by PixFixGuy View Post
For what good this will do, here goes. I like using longer lens and lighting set at a lower angle than 45 degrees to get things lit flatter. I also use a polarizing filter to help prevent glare. That does help. If you don't have a copy-stand, a tripod with a horizontal arm that would allow you to point the camera straight down is a nifty thing. Have fun.
Yes a polarizing filter is going to be very important to deal with reflections if you're shooting with setting your lights at less than 45 degrees (as in if you have two lights right next to the camera instead of out to the sides.)
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