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Composition in photography

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  #21  
Old 05-25-2008, 03:55 PM
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Re: Composition in photography

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Originally Posted by palms1 View Post
...well how did this novice at composition do?
A preponderance of strong horizontal and/or vertical lines generally makes for a rather static composition (though sometimes that's desired). What I see in your crop are two distinct lines that essentially cut the image into 2, 3, even 4 discrete parts. Also, because the fountain is so small and isolated, it's almost distracting. I feel the carts are also too small to considered points of interest.

Try this: cover the left half -> nice, cover the right half -> nice.
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  #22  
Old 05-25-2008, 04:30 PM
MatthewMarshall MatthewMarshall is offline
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Re: Composition in photography

I try not to follow rules and over think what i do. I just do. I dont think in m y head is this well in the norm of the "rules" of composition. I just take photos that i like at the time. It seems to have worked out for me so far.
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  #23  
Old 05-25-2008, 04:32 PM
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Re: Composition in photography

I'm going to take the 5th on this pano. I see possibilities for individual pictures; but the pano as a whole works for me.

On the other hand, I might just cut some off the right side as I'm looking at it. It still keeps a pano feel to the picture but takes some of the excessive length. More in proportion with the golden mean.

Janet

P.S. No pic to post. My computer is having a clean-up, update.
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  #24  
Old 05-25-2008, 05:03 PM
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Re: Composition in photography

Janet,

I think you are right about the extra length on the right side. It doesn't belong in the picture. At least for me, it doesn't.

Lonk,

I agree with you that the "S" curve on the left, should be preserved. For me, it gives it an interesting sense of motion that goes against the static up and down of the trees.

Here is what I ended up doing. Please comment on it.

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Originally Posted by Janet Petty View Post
...
On the other hand, I might just cut some off the right side as I'm looking at it. It still keeps a pano feel to the picture but takes some of the excessive length. More in proportion with the golden mean.
Janet
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  #25  
Old 05-25-2008, 11:06 PM
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Re: Composition in photography

Frank, you cropped it exactly where I would have put the crop.

I think it preserves the S curve, the rule of thirds, and is a pleasing proportion.

Janet
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  #26  
Old 05-26-2008, 12:19 AM
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Re: Composition in photography

Interesting discussion so far, and forgive me for having to disagree with most of what has been said. I, like many of the people here, am familiar with the rules of composition, after having them pounded in my head over several years of film school. I disagree though, that rules and conventions are what define a good photograph.

Photography is more then grabbing a camera and capturing what we see; it is a means to put oneself in that place again when one looks at the picture in the future; it is a means to share the beauty of life in one still frame; it is a means to share the intricate balance and harmony between man and nature. Every photograph, in its own right, does this, and, by some means, will be appealing to someone.

When I'm out with my camera, I'm not thinking about the composition of the image, or where to place things so that they are more 'visually appealing'; I'm thinking about what I WANT out of the images, and what STORY I want to tell with these images. Thinking this way helps me point my camera and capture the image I'm looking for, without much grief.

This idea of the rule of thirds is an age old means of defining what is visually appealing. However, the very definition of creativity is the use of the imagination and original ideas, especially in an artistic work. By defining work as falling within the conventions of the rule of thirds, or any other compositional rule, we strip away the photographers creativity, and creative right.

Ultimately, my argument is that we should never define how well composed a photograph is simply by the 'standard conventions'. Take risks. Tell a story. Be creative.
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  #27  
Old 05-26-2008, 07:09 AM
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Re: Composition in photography

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikolas View Post
Interesting discussion so far, and forgive me for having to disagree with most of what has been said. I, like many of the people here, am familiar with the rules of composition, after having them pounded in my head over several years of film school. I disagree though, that rules and conventions are what define a good photograph.

Photography is more then grabbing a camera and capturing what we see; it is a means to put oneself in that place again when one looks at the picture in the future; it is a means to share the beauty of life in one still frame; it is a means to share the intricate balance and harmony between man and nature. Every photograph, in its own right, does this, and, by some means, will be appealing to someone.

When I'm out with my camera, I'm not thinking about the composition of the image, or where to place things so that they are more 'visually appealing'; I'm thinking about what I WANT out of the images, and what STORY I want to tell with these images. Thinking this way helps me point my camera and capture the image I'm looking for, without much grief.

This idea of the rule of thirds is an age old means of defining what is visually appealing. However, the very definition of creativity is the use of the imagination and original ideas, especially in an artistic work. By defining work as falling within the conventions of the rule of thirds, or any other compositional rule, we strip away the photographers creativity, and creative right.

Ultimately, my argument is that we should never define how well composed a photograph is simply by the 'standard conventions'. Take risks. Tell a story. Be creative.
The rules have come about through a sort of "reverse engineering" of what is considered good art. And it does not alway work. But then, it does help to give folks a "road map" of sorts to begin to help them to "see".
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  #28  
Old 05-26-2008, 07:19 AM
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Re: Composition in photography

Quote:
Originally Posted by LonK View Post
A preponderance of strong horizontal and/or vertical lines generally makes for a rather static composition (though sometimes that's desired). What I see in your crop are two distinct lines that essentially cut the image into 2, 3, even 4 discrete parts. Also, because the fountain is so small and isolated, it's almost distracting. I feel the carts are also too small to considered points of interest.

Try this: cover the left half -> nice, cover the right half -> nice.
Thank you Lonk for your input, I find this to be quite tricky although interesting, And i find it is easier to learn by doing excersises like this one, and that is what i liked about your first link the do and not do photo's


Palms
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  #29  
Old 05-26-2008, 09:23 AM
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Janet Petty Janet Petty is offline
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Re: Composition in photography

Palms, that might be a good tangent for this discussion thread. If we could post examples and learn from them, then it will take us to a whole new dimension of learning.

Janet
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  #30  
Old 05-26-2008, 11:49 AM
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Re: Composition in photography

Great topic. This is a picture I took in Morocco last year, without any real thought towards composition, this is the way I cropped it. Just what I felt was pleasing to my eye.

I'd be interested in the thoughts of others, as to how they would have treated it. And why.
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File Type: jpg Morocco-Crop.jpg (92.4 KB, 55 views)
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