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image stabilizer

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  #1  
Old 05-02-2010, 11:00 AM
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jarulex jarulex is offline
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image stabilizer

Hello Folks
I'm mostly shooting in studio with flashes at the speed of 1/60" f/11 or f/16.
My lens Canon 24-105 L IS USM offers me the opportunity to switch 'on' or 'off' the image stabilizer.
These are my questions:
1) is 1/60" too slow for digital captures?
2) should I switch 'on' or 'off' the image stabilizer (in facts even at that 'slow' speed I don't really need it, I mean I shoot so far with a film camera without...)? Or is just non influent?
Enjoy your Sunday, by the way. Paolo
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Old 05-02-2010, 11:14 AM
creativeretouch creativeretouch is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

Hi Jarulex,
it does not matter if you shoot on digital or film. The image stabilizer is there because of the size of your lens. Try to shoot with stabilizer on and off and compare final sharpness on the screen of your computer. I suggest to live it on.
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Old 05-02-2010, 12:08 PM
Mike Mike is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

Also remember that with some of the Canon equipment, if you use a tripod you have to turn off the IS function. If you are hand holding, I would turn it on but remember that doing so may induce a bit of delay due to the camera having to wait for the IS to do its job.
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Old 05-02-2010, 12:26 PM
slash-5 slash-5 is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

IS is for hand held. Never shoot people slower than 1/125.
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Old 05-02-2010, 04:50 PM
Mike Mike is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

Quote:
Originally Posted by slash-5 View Post
IS is for hand held. Never shoot people slower than 1/125.
I could agree with your first sentence, but the second is way too broad to be meaningful.

Under the right circumstances, one can very successfully take photographs of people slower than 1/125. Then there are the times that 1/250 or 1/500 maybe required.

First and foremost, what is the person doing? What effect are you trying to get in your photograph? Are you using a flash or not? All of these have a bearing on what shutter speed to use.

For example, if you want to add some blur so as to denote motion on that kid sliding into second base, a 1/60 or 1/30 with the proper panning will give you something to work with. The opposite would be if you wanted to freeze all the action, then maybe a 1/250 or 1/500 would be more a approbate.

The slowest speed I have ever used handheld for a person was (I think) about 1/10 of a second. Of course I was backed into a corner, had the camera smashed against my face, held my breath and slowly squeezed the button. Did a couple and got one that worked. The subject didn't mind me taking my time and he did not move, he was dead. Like I said, it all depends on the circumstances.
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:04 PM
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skydog skydog is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

I've shot high ISO and at 1/15 sec with IS on without any problems - subjects were very still. I have had problems with IS when shooting fast action sports and normally (not always) turn it off.
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Old 05-02-2010, 08:47 PM
slash-5 slash-5 is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

We can argue all you want, but the OP was asking a general question about shooting people, and I gave him a general rule which is true. I could list all sorts of exceptions to every single statement you have made, but our purpose here is not to argue but to help people.

Even with flash, at 1/60, you will still see movement. Since that is not what he/she wants, he/she will have to shoot faster. 1/125 is a great rule of thumb and has not been negated in the least by your statements (which have done nothing to help the OP). Go argue somewhere else.
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Old 05-02-2010, 09:14 PM
slash-5 slash-5 is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

Also, if you are using strobes, the pulse will most likely be faster than the shutter at 1/125 anyway, so there is no point to shooting slower than that in a studio...the shutter controls ambient. And frequently, ambient isn't a factor in studio.
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Old 05-31-2010, 01:12 AM
daisyallen daisyallen is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

As per the my opinion It basically reduces shake from camera movement to prevent blur , It's best to have it off when mounted on a tripod; saves the battery power . Particular for Canon Optical Image Stabilizer technology uses miniature sensors and a high-speed microcomputer built into the lens.
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Old 05-31-2010, 08:18 AM
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RooB RooB is offline
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Re: image stabilizer

How slow you can shoot with sharpness, depends on you.

There's really no right or wrong for shutter, it's what you can handle.

Often, when I shoot people, I shoot between as 1/50th and 1/80th of a sec, ISO 200, without a tripod and without IS; but, when I get down to slower shutter speeds I lose the ability to shoot sharp. For instance, the attached photo was taken at f4.0, 1/50th, 200 ISO. It was done hand held, and there's no motion blur in the photo; most of my portraits are done in this range. Very rare, will I shoot above 1/100th. Yet, when two of my photographer friends shoots at the same shutter speeds I do, their photos often contain blur, even with IS turned on.

Of course, it also depends on what I'm shooting. If the person is sitting still, 1/50th is definitely fast enough for me handheld; but if they're moving, or I'm photographing an event, I will bump up the shutter speed to 1/100 - 1/125.

Personally, I've always felt IS was a gimmick; I tried the IS version of my lenses versus the non-IS versions before I bought them, and there was no discernible difference between turning IS on and turning IS off.
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