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TV sizes

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  #11  
Old 03-15-2006, 11:31 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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thanks, racc

craig
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  #12  
Old 03-16-2006, 12:33 AM
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In Nero, the DVD is burned according to the settings you've entered. You can tell it to burn either a 4:3 or 16:9 DVD. It will pad your image/video data as needed to maintain the original aspect ratio and fit the target aspect ratio (so portrait photos will have black bands on the sides.) 4:3 is better for photos unless you are doing a bunch of panoramas. Even if your customer has a 16:9 TV, a 4:3 DVD will show all 4:3 and 3:2 photo larger on screen.

The target DVD player will see which format DVD it is and distort things appropriately (my cheap DVD player knows to do this.) Assuming the user has already configured their DVD player to work with their particular TV, your DVD will look correct.

Bart
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  #13  
Old 03-16-2006, 09:41 AM
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Racc Iria Racc Iria is offline
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Craig, you're welcome.

Quote:
From 1STLITE...
I guess my point is that I don't think there is any way to determine what the customer is going to see when they get the dvd home. I guess it is the same as web and all that - never know what kind of crappy monitor Joe and Jane Customer may be viewing your images on. Ugh - this is complicated. lol
It's true, this can be a very tricky process. But there are some tools that can help you out.

You can't know or control how the customer has the contrast, brightness, color, etc. set on their TV at home. All you can do is make sure that your images adhere as closely as possible to the NTSC standard.

The professionals use two pieces of equipment (among many others) to do this. They are a waveform and a vector scope. The waveform measures the brightness information in a video frame in IRE (a unit of measurement created by the Institute of Radio Engineers). Video black is supposed to be at 7.5 IRE and video white is supposed to be 100 IRE. Computer black (RGB 0,0,0) is 0 IRE. Computer white (RGB 255,255,255) blows past the end of the scale. This is why pure white or bright colors get clipped and darker colors look too dark on a TV screen.

A vector scope is used for color calibration of a video monitor. A standard color bars image is generated with known values and using the scope colors are represented as spikes eminating from the center of the scope (vectors), and the tips of these vectors are supposed to align with marks on the scope. If they don't, adjustments are made to the monitor or the video signal.

Since you probably don't have access to these expensive pieces of equipment, there are a few things you can do in Photoshop to help make sure you're generating color safe images for TV.

1. When making images for video or the web turn color management off. This will give you the closet appoximation of what others will see. This is a complex and controversial discussion that I won't go into here, but trust me on this, it will make life much easier in the long run. If you must use color managment, the next best thing to do would be to use the "NTSC (1953)" color profile. But, it's not perfect.

2. Make sure that any colors you use don't go below RGB 16,16,16 or higher than 235,235,235. For white, 235,235,235 produces 100 IRE. This still causes "blooming" and "bleeding" so white should optimally be closer to 80 IRE, which is somewhere around 217,217,217. These are not hard rules, just guidelines. You can cheat a little here.

3. Once your image is completed, you can also apply the "NTSC Colors" filter from the Fliters>Video section. This kind of does what you should do manually in number 2 above.

--Racc
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  #14  
Old 03-16-2006, 11:23 AM
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Racc - Thank you SO much! I am off to test it out! TYTYTYTYTY!!!

Dawn
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  #15  
Old 03-16-2006, 12:09 PM
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You're quite welcome! It's my pleasure.

--Racc
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  #16  
Old 03-16-2006, 12:16 PM
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Hi Racc.

Thank you that’s really interesting.
I guess the IRE brightness will apply to PAL in the same way.

Do you have any info on PAL?
When I did some of these I stretched the pictures from 702 x 540 to 720 x 540
I can’t remember where I got the figure of 702. Do you know if that’s correct?

Ken.
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  #17  
Old 03-16-2006, 12:47 PM
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Racc Iria Racc Iria is offline
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Sorry, I just saw this part.

Quote:
From 1STLITE...
Also, when you open a new document there are guides included. WHat exactly are they for? I have noticed they are the same guides in my dvd program for making these slideshows, but I honestly have no idea what they are for. Which guides to I go by to be sure the whole image shows up?

I have been having issues with the whole image not showing up on the tv, so I really want to get this down before I mess another one up - lol. Oh and for viewing on a tv, do I use 72 ppi?
On a TV screen you can't see all the way to the edges of the picture... the bezel of the TV case as well as differences in pictures tubes which change as they age, etc. prevent this. This is refered to as "Overscan." The edges of a TV frame are really quite messy, and can contain ugly little bits of information like timecode blips, or in the case of DV video thin black lines down the left and right sides. So you really don't want to see the edges.

So, if you don't know where the edges are how can you make sure that important stuff will be visible on the screen? That's what those guides are for. The outside guide represents the Action Safe area and the Indise guide represents the Title Safe area.

Inside the Title Safe area is where you want to put any text or important elements that you want to guarantee will be seen when viewed on a TV screen. If the size of your image represents 100% of the screen, the Title Safe area is at 80% of your image size.

The Action Safe area represents 90% of the image size and is generally used to make sure action or movement in the image is visible, but it isn't as critical as text for example so it's get's a little more latitude.

Think of it this way... Anything inside of the Title Safe area is absolutely guaranteed to be seen on the TV screen. The closer you put stuff to the Action Safe line or the edge of the image the greater the chance it could be cropped off by the TV. Some really bad or old televisions sometimes overscan past the action safe line. So, basically the closer to the edge you put something the more you're gambling that it won't be seen.

Regular 4:3 standard definition television resolution is about 72ppi. If you have a 300 ppi image that you want to display on TV you don't have to change the resolution it'll show up fine, just like on a computer monitor. However, if you're creating images from scratch, making them at anything greater than 72 ppi is just wasting file size.

I apologize for missing those questions before.

--Racc
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  #18  
Old 03-16-2006, 01:37 PM
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Racc Iria Racc Iria is offline
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Quote:
From Cameraken...

I guess the IRE brightness will apply to PAL in the same way.

Do you have any info on PAL?
When I did some of these I stretched the pictures from 702 x 540 to 720 x 540
I can’t remember where I got the figure of 702. Do you know if that’s correct?
Hi, Ken.

Yes, most of what I talked about will work for PAL, too. The only differences are the image size and that PAL is much more forgiving with the colors. By following the guildlines for NTSC, but using the PAL image sizes you should be okay.

The PAL DV (non-square pixel) image size is 720x576. To make images for PAL using square pixels, make the image 768x576 and when you're finished, resize it to 720x576. PAL requires horizontal compensation, while NTSC requires vertical compensation.

I'm in the U.S. and so only work in NTSC, so I'm afraid I don't know as much about PAL, especially concerning the differences in color. I do know that one of the reasons PAL was created was to correct the color issues of NTSC. I'd have to do some research to learn more about it begfore recommending PAL safe colors. NTSC colors, though, are PAL safe since NTSC has a smaller color space.

Hope that helps.

--Scott
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  #19  
Old 03-16-2006, 02:12 PM
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Yes. It does help.
Thanks Racc.

Ken.
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  #20  
Old 03-16-2006, 02:29 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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racc,

interesting.

ok, here's a newbie question for you. what about the newer higher resolution tvs? are these using the same aspect ratios in general or something else? and are they using the same raster techniques as before only with more rasters or are they doing something else?

also, on a related question, what does s-video do, like if you hook up your computer to your tv via s-video? if the aspect ratios are different and the pixels are different, then how is s-video handling all this?

craig
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