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TV sizes

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  #1  
Old 03-14-2006, 03:44 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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TV sizes

Hey all. Wasn't sure if this was the correct place for this question, but I need help so it was the best I could figure - lol. Here is the thing. I need to crop some pictures sized to fit a tv screen. WHat aspect ratio (thats the right term, right?) is appropriate for this. Is there an preset for the crop tool, or can I set one? For some reason what was in my head was 720x480. But I am thinking that is not right for a regular tv screen. Anyone know about this?

THanks!

Dawn

EDIT_ Ok I am thinking maybe this should have been under the software heading? ANyways, So I look through the default sizes for a new document in photoshop, and a few of them are sized for tv screen, that is the NTSC sizes right? But how do I know which one to use? And what would be the best way to go about cropping the images to fit this? Also, when you open a new document there are guides included. WHat exactly are they for? I have noticed they are the same guides in my dvd program for making these slideshows, but I honestly have no idea what they are for. Which guides to I go by to be sure the whole image shows up? And is the regular tv size going to be the 720 x 540? It looks the most correct, but I am not sure. I have been having issues with the whole image not showing up on the tv, so I really want to get this down before I mess another one up - lol. Oh and for viewing on a tv, do I use 72 ppi? Thanks much!

Dawn

Last edited by 1STLITE; 03-14-2006 at 03:54 PM.
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2006, 04:27 PM
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640x480 it's what a regular TV displays, always.

There are new High definition TV's that shows 800x600

And there are Wide Screen TV's that shows 853x480

But you need to ask about the software you are using to make your final VCD or DVD. Or are you displaying directly from the PC?

Because there is always some pixels lost in the TV, ALWAYS, and there are different on Sony than Panasonic.

What we do, or my family do, it's render a minute or 2 in the DVD and taste it in a small TV that they have next the computer, so if they need to adjust something, they doit before the final proyect it's done.

Last edited by studioj; 03-14-2006 at 04:34 PM.
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Old 03-14-2006, 06:29 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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Thanks, studioj. I am using Nero. It came with the dvd burner - lol. I am not sure if I will be able to re-burn after the test, but I will look into it Do I use 72dpi for tv, or would it be better to go with 300 like print?

Dawn
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Old 03-14-2006, 07:42 PM
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Hi Dawn.

TV formats vary across the world
In the UK we use PAL format which is 720 x 576 pixels (4x3 Ratio)
However in the USA the NTSC format is 720 x 480 pixels
A widescreen image is 16.9 (UK)

All this gets very confusing. Some Programs that write DVD’s will try to make any pictures fit the format by enlarging or adding black lines to the pictures.
Also pictures can get stretched because ‘pixels’ on a TV are not square, again depending on the software used.

So it really depends on the software you use.
Make a test DVD of several pictures and make notes. See what happens.

Make a test picture of a circle and see if it’s still a circle on the TV

I tried loads of programs trying to get this sorted. I now use ULead PictureShow which I found the best IMHO.

72dpi is fine. There is no need for a higher resolution for a TV.

Hope this helps.

Ken.
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Old 03-15-2006, 01:31 PM
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Racc Iria Racc Iria is offline
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My job is designing graphics for television. So far, everyone has been partially right.

The size that you need to make your images will vary slightly depending on how you're getting them on the TV.

If you're using something like a scan converter to translate the computer screen to video the size you want to make your images is 640x480 or 800x600 if it's supported by your scan converter.

The standard broadcast size of an NTSC image is 720x486. However, if you're editing in DV or making a DVD you want to make your images 720x480.

Another thing you might run into is the square vs. non-square pixel issue. Computer screens only display square pixels while television screens only display non-square pixels. Most of the time you won't notice the difference, but if you look carefully an image designed in square pixels will be a little stretched when viewed on a television screen.

This is because a square pixel image has a pixel aspect ratio of 1, while a non-square image has a pixel aspect of 0.9. This effect is most noticable on circlular areas in the image. The pixel aspect ratio is a separate issue from the image aspect ratio.

When working with images in Photoshop CS or CS2 that you know are destined for a television screen, create an image using the Pixel Aspect Ratio preset of "D1/DV NTSC (0.9)." If your image already exists as square pixels, create a new image using the D1/DV NTSC preset and drag the old image layer into the new image.

Your image might look stretched or squashed on the computer screen, but it will look just fine on TV. You can have Photoshop simulate what the image would look like on a TV screen by going to the VIEW menu and checking and the "Pixel Aspect Ratio Correction" option. This view is not perfect, though, and you should treat it as if you were viewing the image with a proof setup.

If you don't have CS or CS2 then design your images at 720x540 (you'll be using square pixels) and when your image is finished, save a copy of it, and resize it to 720x480 (or 720x486 if you're not using DV or going to DVD). This will squash your image, but the different aspect ratio of the pixels on a TV screen will make your image look correct again.

Hope this hasn't been too confusing. And we didn't even talk about color issues.

--Racc
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Old 03-15-2006, 01:38 PM
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Great explanation Racc Iria!
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Old 03-15-2006, 01:54 PM
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Hi Racc.

Thank You. That’s very interesting.
One point I was trying to make was that some software does the stretching for you and some doesn’t.

All the testing I did goes back three years so things may have changed, but at the time for some programs I had to do the stretching manually.

I was putting Slides and negs on DVD and many were taken in ‘portrait’ format. When these are viewed on a widescreen (16.9) TV then things can look very squashed.

Ken.
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Old 03-15-2006, 01:59 PM
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Craig Walters Craig Walters is offline
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Quote:
create an image using the Pixel Aspect Ratio preset of "D1/DV NTSC (0.9)."
you wanna break that down, please? what is 'D1'? and is 'DV NTSC (0.9)' all one phrase or is it 'DV NTSC' and '(0.9)', where the '(0.9)' would be taken as a multiplication brackets?

craig
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Old 03-15-2006, 07:12 PM
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Racc Iria Racc Iria is offline
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Quote:
From Kraellin...

you wanna break that down, please? what is 'D1'? and is 'DV NTSC (0.9)' all one phrase or is it 'DV NTSC' and '(0.9)', where the '(0.9)' would be taken as a multiplication brackets?
Sure, Craig, no problem.

D1 is a high-end digital tape format used at large TV stations and post-production houses. It was created in the early stages of the digital revolution as a way to store video digitally onto magnetic tape (kind of like DAT tape but much larger). This was necessary as hard drive storage space was prohibitively expensive and networking/internet was in its infancy and out of the question as a transportation medium. As these technologies have matured and become cheaper and newer technologies delevop D1 is falling by the wayside. The image size of D1 is 720x486 (an image aspect ratio of 1.3333) and uses non-square pixels (a pixel aspect ratio of 0.9).

DV, of course, refers to the Digital Video format used by many non-linear video editing systems today and is also part of the DVD specification in the form of Mpeg-2. It's image size is 720x480 (an image aspect ratio of 1.35) and uses non-square pixels (0.9).

NTSC is the standard video format used primarily in the United States and Japan. It gets its name from the National Television Standards Committee that was formed to establish a video standard for use in the USA. Engineers in the TV industry swear that what the acronym NTSC really stands for is "Never The Same Color."

(0.9) refers to the pixel aspect ratio. By far, the two most commonly used in television/computers is square pixels (1) and non-square pixels (0.9).

Photoshop's Pixel Aspect Ratio presets (not to be confused with the image presets at the top of the dialog) found at the bottom of the new image dialog in CS and CS2 lists the preset you want to use exactly as "D1/DV NTSC (0.9)" without the quotes. It should be the second entry in the drop-down list after "Square." The reason is that it just so happens that the pixel aspect ratio for both the D1 and the DV formats is exactly the same... 0.9. And as far as the image size goes... if you're using D1 (which you probably never will) make your image size 720x486 and if you're using DV (which is probably most of the time) make your image size 720x480.

The DVD spec isn't as forgiving, but most video editing/display equipment will simply ignore the extra 6 lines of pixels if you accidentally make your image at 720x486. Which six lines that get ignored only becomes an issue when you have to deal with the field order of the video interlacing, but that's a whole other lengthy discussion.

Did that clarify things or muddy them up even more?

--Racc
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Old 03-15-2006, 09:08 PM
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1STLITE 1STLITE is offline
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Ok. So-- I am thinking I want to pup the top back on this can - lol. No, just kidding. I really appreciate all of the info! Something else that I have been thinking of - as far as DVDs are concerned - I don;t know about other dvd players, but I know ours has many different settings and it will change when you see on the screen depending which is selected. And that is just referring to what gets "chopped" - then you have the color and brightness that changes. I guess my point is that I don't think there is any way to determine what the customer is going to see when they get the dvd home. I guess it is the same as web and all that - never know what kind of crappy monitor Joe and Jane Customer may be viewing your images on. Ugh - this is complicated. lol

The reason I ask all of this is I have begun offering DVD photo slideshows. You know, just as I get all the color issues worked out with printing and web and sending for prints, now I get a whole new set of rules!

Nero is what I have been using for makign these slideshows. I like how easy it was to learn, but I wish there were more to it. Either way though, the software came with the dvd burner, and it has already paid for itself. Anyone else out there making these? I would love to know your experiance with them, and what program(s) you use, and why.

Dawn
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