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TIP: History help

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  #1  
Old 10-24-2001, 07:56 AM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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TIP: History help

History can make a snapshot automatically every time you save your file, enabling you to return to any previous state. Turn on this option in the history flyout menu under options.

You can also pick any point along the history timeline and use the flyout menu to choose 'new document'. A copy of your image with only the changes made up to the point you selected will appear.
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Old 10-24-2001, 09:44 AM
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Thanks for the great tip Doug. You can't believe how many times I start using the brush or clone tools making little corrections and wind up using up my alloted history states then decide it's not working out but can't go back far enough to undo it all. I'm definately a candidate for this tip.
DJ
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Old 11-20-2001, 03:56 AM
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Trick Trick is offline
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Actualy, one of the most useful tools...

The History Brush and in fact the concept of document history in general, is one of the most useful things that Photoshop has been able to offer starting in version 5. It's also one of the least understood.

Having taught Photoshop for 2 years, and used it since it wasn't even an Adobe product, I can safely say that the history brush is one of the single most confusing of the tools on the tool palette (I'd have to say the Art History brush is the most confusing...it doesn't even work the way it says it does), but in fact, it's actually an easier tool to use than it's slightly more often used counterpart, the clone stamp/patternstamp tool.

Seeing s how this is a sight based mostly on restorations, I can say that the number one mistake I see beginning Photoshop users make when working on restorations is to over-use the clone stamp tool. Master the History brush! It's the one tool you have that allows you to paint in any filter you've applied in the manner you wish to apply it! Heck, I've even gone so far as to paint in a lens flare in color dodge mode...just because I COULD. (It was really ugly, though, so I did undo that...try it, you'll see what I mean)

The main issue that a loto of people have is the establishment of a history source state...which is relly no more difficult than establishing clone source or pattern for the stamp tools...

Mess with the History brush, it's worth experimenting.
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Old 11-20-2001, 09:57 AM
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Excellent point Trick. I love the history brush too but I have to admit, like most, I don't always use it to it's full potential. I think what happens to most people is that they get comfortable with certain tools that seem easy to use and it becomes a routine even though they may learn another way. Look at how often people will use every selection tool but the pen tool. I think I am going to try to concentrate more on tools that I am overlooking from now on. The more you use them the more comfortable you become with their use.
DJ
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Old 11-20-2001, 10:13 AM
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i read somewhere once that the history brush wasn't as - i think fluid was the word they used - as other tools. hence, never having mastered it, i quit using it. i take it from what you all have said that you don't find this to be the case.

i use layer masks in much the way trick (?your real name is ? patrick?) described (re filters etc) for history brush, but i am full of fresh motivation now to check out the hb. thanks
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Old 11-21-2001, 05:11 AM
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Well, when you say it like that...

The History brush, in all actuality, works exactly the same as the paintbrush, pencil, clone & pattern stamp...it just uses a different kind of "paint."

In answer to the layer mask question, the answer is rather a difficult one, unless we liken the idea to say...pies. When is it a good idea to have custard pie vs. lemon merengue? How about apple pie?

It's one of the mny things about Photoshop that I enjoy, there's usually five or six different ways to accomplish the same results. In the case of the History, yet another thing I've discovered is that if you press shift-delete, bringing up the fill dialog box, History is an option. So in fact, you can now undo your last actions in a selected area, at a specified opacity, using a specified blending mode.

And since this is a photo-restoration site by nature, I should add that whenever I do restorations, I always apply individually, Gaussian Blur, Dust & Scratches, Median, and levels to extreme light & dark...making snapshots of each, undoing the filter, and proceeding to the next...then I have five history states, each ideally suited to one of the major aspects of restoration, and I use the History brush to paint each one in, as much as is necessary. I enjoy the irony of what this really does, which is to convert the History brush into the fuure brush...as it will paint in things that as fara s the document is concerned, haven't happened yet.

The image details maintains, but the flaws disappear. All you need to know is how each filter works, how each blending mode works, and most people knew that before...For the most part, i avoid 100% opacity, never working over 90%, And I tend to use darken and lighten mode more than most others...
...but the paint you use is exactly the same pixels you're painting over, just as it appeared at another time.

And it's every bit as flexible and versatile as every other painting tool...the ART History Brush is another story...I'm still working on that bad boy.

But basically, whoever wrote or said that, just didn't understand the tool, and it's been my experience (especially with other teachers) that when something is not totally understood, either it is inferior, or the user is inferior...and seldom will the user blame themselves. A bad workman always blames his tools.
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  #7  
Old 11-21-2001, 07:13 AM
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I like the idea of having different levels of history states to use later. I will give that a try next time. I ususally do them one at a time and use it immediately but I like the idea of having them in reserve when ever I want them. Great tip, Trick.
DJ
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Old 11-21-2001, 07:52 AM
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that's a really good idea, re making those different states right at the beginning and painting with your future brush. will try it. thanks (pa)trick. (i figured it out
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  #9  
Old 11-21-2001, 12:21 PM
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I've gotta try that!
< "apply individually, Gaussian Blur, Dust & Scratches, Median, and levels to extreme light & dark...making snapshots of each, undoing the filter, and proceeding to the next...then I have five history states, each ideally suited to one of the major aspects of restoration, and I use the History brush to paint each one in, as much as is necessary." >

Thanks! (Pa) Trick
Thanks! Kathleen -- I DIDN'T figure it out...
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