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Haggis

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  #1  
Old 08-26-2007, 02:11 PM
ibowie ibowie is offline
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Newbie Haggis

It is well known that the Haggi live in the mountains of Scotland and have two legs on the left shorter than the two legs on the right due to their tendancy to run round the mountain in a clockwise direction. They are impossible to catch but one can emulate them with the following recipe.

Eaten across the world on Jan 25 with neeps and tatties.

1 sheep's (or lamb's) stomach, well rinsed and fresh
6 oz coarse or pinbead oatmeal (not porridge or rolled oats)
1 sheep's pluck (the liver, heart and lungs)
1 lb suet (the fat which surround the kidneys, can be lamb or beef)
1 lb onions
salt and pepper
The Haggis, is quite simply a large boiling sausage stuffed with oatmeal and a variety of meats flavored with onion. The meats need not be mutton offal; There are recipes which replace it with lean mutton, and others which use venison offal. It can also be made without the stomach bag- cook the mixture very gently in a covered pan for 3 hours, stirring regularly so that it does not stick. The haggis mix can also be put in a pudding bowl with wax paper tied over it, and then steamed over boiling water for 3 hours. It will be excellent, but so authentically barbaric.

Serves 6.

TIME: If you have to do preparing 1-2 hours, plus 3 hours cooking. Preheat the oven to 400F. You need lots of elbow room and a large stewingpan. Tackle the stomach bag first. Turn it inside out; then scrub and scrape it in several changes of cold water. Scald it and leave it to soak for a few hours in water and salt. Put the oatmeal, well spread out on a baking tray, to toast golden brown in the oven for 10 minutes.

Wash the pluck well. Drain the liver and heart of its blood (the butcher will have most likely done this anyhow). If you cannot get the lungs, the kidney or tongue will do instead. Put the pluck into cold salted water, boil, then skim and simmer for 1 hour.

Drain the pluck and check it, removing the black bits and veins. Grate the liver and chop the rest of the meat. (You may not need all the liver half is usually enough) Chop the suet, and rub out the membrane scraps with well-floured hands. Mince the onions fine. Mix the meats, suet, and onions together, and spread them out on the table. Sprinkle the oatmeal on top. Season with salt and a heavy hand on the pepper mill. Here some add lemon juice, cayenne pepper, and a selection of herbs. The secret lies in the proportions, and you will soon establish your own preference.

Mix the whole lot together and stuff it into the stomach bag, or the sausage skin, that is available in some specialty stores in North American (just don't tell a Scot, you're doing this!). The stomach bag will be a little over half filled, but this is to allow room for the oatmeal to swell. Moisten with good stock- to make the mixture look juicy. Press out the air and sew the bag up.

Put the haggis on an upturned saucer in a pan of boiling water or stock. Heat gently; do not allow to reboil. Prick the bag with a needle when it first swells. Simmer for 3 hours if the haggis is a large one. When you want to reheat it, simmer it for an extra hour.

SUGGESTIONS: You can make a haggis mixture with liver, onions and oatmeal alone, using the pan or bowl method mentioned. If you cannot get the offal use mutton or stewing lamb. The suet should not be omitted, but can be replaced with well minced beef, or pork kidney.

Haggis also reheats beautifully -- just scoop it out of it's coverings into a saucepan, add a little extra water, and heat it up gently.

Last edited by ibowie; 08-26-2007 at 02:21 PM.
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:31 AM
Steve Conway's Avatar
Steve Conway Steve Conway is offline
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Re: Haggis

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibowie View Post
It is well known that the Haggi live in the mountains of Scotland and have two legs on the left shorter than the two legs on the right due to their tendancy to run round the mountain in a clockwise direction. They are impossible to catch but one can emulate them with the following recipe.

Eaten across the world on Jan 25 with neeps and tatties.

1 sheep's (or lamb's) stomach, well rinsed and fresh
6 oz coarse or pinbead oatmeal (not porridge or rolled oats)
1 sheep's pluck (the liver, heart and lungs)
1 lb suet (the fat which surround the kidneys, can be lamb or beef)
1 lb onions
salt and pepper
The Haggis, is quite simply a large boiling sausage stuffed with oatmeal and a variety of meats flavored with onion. The meats need not be mutton offal; There are recipes which replace it with lean mutton, and others which use venison offal. It can also be made without the stomach bag- cook the mixture very gently in a covered pan for 3 hours, stirring regularly so that it does not stick. The haggis mix can also be put in a pudding bowl with wax paper tied over it, and then steamed over boiling water for 3 hours. It will be excellent, but so authentically barbaric.

Serves 6.

TIME: If you have to do preparing 1-2 hours, plus 3 hours cooking. Preheat the oven to 400F. You need lots of elbow room and a large stewingpan. Tackle the stomach bag first. Turn it inside out; then scrub and scrape it in several changes of cold water. Scald it and leave it to soak for a few hours in water and salt. Put the oatmeal, well spread out on a baking tray, to toast golden brown in the oven for 10 minutes.

Wash the pluck well. Drain the liver and heart of its blood (the butcher will have most likely done this anyhow). If you cannot get the lungs, the kidney or tongue will do instead. Put the pluck into cold salted water, boil, then skim and simmer for 1 hour.

Drain the pluck and check it, removing the black bits and veins. Grate the liver and chop the rest of the meat. (You may not need all the liver half is usually enough) Chop the suet, and rub out the membrane scraps with well-floured hands. Mince the onions fine. Mix the meats, suet, and onions together, and spread them out on the table. Sprinkle the oatmeal on top. Season with salt and a heavy hand on the pepper mill. Here some add lemon juice, cayenne pepper, and a selection of herbs. The secret lies in the proportions, and you will soon establish your own preference.

Mix the whole lot together and stuff it into the stomach bag, or the sausage skin, that is available in some specialty stores in North American (just don't tell a Scot, you're doing this!). The stomach bag will be a little over half filled, but this is to allow room for the oatmeal to swell. Moisten with good stock- to make the mixture look juicy. Press out the air and sew the bag up.

Put the haggis on an upturned saucer in a pan of boiling water or stock. Heat gently; do not allow to reboil. Prick the bag with a needle when it first swells. Simmer for 3 hours if the haggis is a large one. When you want to reheat it, simmer it for an extra hour.

SUGGESTIONS: You can make a haggis mixture with liver, onions and oatmeal alone, using the pan or bowl method mentioned. If you cannot get the offal use mutton or stewing lamb. The suet should not be omitted, but can be replaced with well minced beef, or pork kidney.

Haggis also reheats beautifully -- just scoop it out of it's coverings into a saucepan, add a little extra water, and heat it up gently.
Just a thought; wouldn't their right legs tend to be shorter if they ran around the mountain in a clockwise direction???

Steve C.
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Old 08-27-2007, 10:44 AM
ibowie ibowie is offline
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Re: Haggis

Steve,

Depends on whether the Scot was flying or lying drunk on the ground looking up! :-)


ian
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  #4  
Old 08-27-2007, 01:46 PM
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Steve Conway Steve Conway is offline
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Re: Haggis

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Originally Posted by ibowie View Post
Steve,

Depends on whether the Scot was flying or lying drunk on the ground looking up! :-)


ian
Getting a bit deep for me. So I'll now don me kilt and bros, not forgetting my Haggis and you take the high road and I'll take the low road....and I'll be in Scotland afore ye.

Steve C.
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