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Gardening?

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  #41  
Old 06-16-2002, 03:53 PM
Irene Irene is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Blacknight

What is this? I have seen it somewhere in one of my flower books but I can't find it. Do you know what it's called? It wasn't there last year, but now it has bloomed and I think it is just so unique...

It's an Osteospermum, common name African Daisy. For more info check out <http://www.osteospermum.com/>
Under Photo Album see Spooned. Yours may be one of those pictured.
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  #42  
Old 06-16-2002, 07:52 PM
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Blacknight Blacknight is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Irene


It's an Osteospermum, common name African Daisy. For more info check out <http://www.osteospermum.com/>
Under Photo Album see Spooned. Yours may be one of those pictured.
It is indeed! Thank you so much! Now that I know the name I can research it and find out what it needs and what it likes and maybe get it to multiply.
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  #43  
Old 07-06-2002, 02:19 PM
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Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
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After my roses bloomed, and changed colors (which was cool), the flowers wilted and fell off, which is normal. But that was it, no new roses. Is that the way roses work? A week or so of blooms, then nothing the rest of the year? The canes are getting enormous, though, almost taller than me.
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  #44  
Old 07-06-2002, 02:29 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Roses like to be cut. You have to deadhead roses to encourage more blooms. It's also good to harvest some for bouquets, which also encourages more blooming. If spent and wilting blooms are left on the canes, energy that could be used to produce new blooms will be spent trying to revive the dead ones instead.

(and if the bush is new, it may not hit it's blooming stride till the second year...)
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  #45  
Old 07-06-2002, 04:52 PM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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I probably shouldn't be posting here because I know *very* little about roses. But I think it depends on the type of roses you have as to how and when they bloom. We have some roses that bloom, die down, get deadheaded, then new ones come on. We also have different roses that I think bloom throughout the whole summer. Some roses don't even look like what I think roses are supposed to look like! Nature and Photoshop --- so much to learn.

Ed
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  #46  
Old 07-06-2002, 05:09 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Hmmm. Maybe the geographical area has something to do with it too then.

When I lived in Portland, OR I had 35 rose bushes of various types. With the exception of the climbing rose I had, which was a spoaradic bloomer until it was about 3 years old, they all bloomed insanely all summer long... All I did was feed them monthly and keep the dead blooms cut.

Of course, Portland is the rose capital of the world... But since I've moved to Ohio, I haven't put in any rose bushes yet, so I'm not sure if they perform differently in this kind of climate.
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  #47  
Old 07-06-2002, 09:23 PM
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I asked my wife about the blooming characteristics of roses. She is not an authority on roses, but she does know gardening pretty well. She told me quite a bit about roses, but I didn't retain it very well. She is from the school that (for the most part) it is better to improve the soil than to fertilize. She feels that with good soil, it isn't necessary to fertilize except for certain types of roses like tea roses (which we don't have). She mentioned that the midwest is not the best place for roses, and she did mention that Oregon was great due to the more stable temperatures and being relatively drought free. In her opinion, cold temps in winter, and hot temps in summer along with wild fluctuations in rainfall and snowfall combined with soil conditions have a lot to due with how well roses will do from year to year.

If she knew I posted this, she wouldn't be a happy camper because there have been times when I didn't listen --- I just heard her talking! But since she knows flowers pretty well, I thought I'd try to get it right. Now I'm goiong to do something really bad. I'm gonna hit the "submit reply" button.

Ed
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  #48  
Old 07-06-2002, 09:42 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Your stories about you and your wife just crack me up, Ed.

I'd agree with her about the soil improvement in lieu of fertilizer, but along with being the rose capital of the world, Portland is also the aphid capital of the world. The rose food I used also had a systemic pesticide that eliminated those nasty li'l critters.

She is also very correct about Portland having the perfect climate for roses.

Here are way more facts than you ever wanted to know about Portland and roses:

Portland is nicknamed "The Rose City" or "City of Roses"

Portland is home to the International Rose Test Gardens

The Portland Trail Blazers play at the Rose Garden, which is in the Rose Quarter District (near where I used to live - I could walk to the games)

Portland is the site of the Rose Festival, a month-long celebration, part of which is the Grand Floral Parade - the second largest parade of floats made from flowers after the Pasadena Rose Parade.
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  #49  
Old 07-06-2002, 10:18 PM
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It is the first year for these roses, so I'll give them another year before I rip them out and put down sod
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  #50  
Old 07-06-2002, 10:24 PM
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fugitive fugitive is offline
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And I live here, amongst all the roses, and rain. I got 2 mini roses last summer, and 2 more this, but I killed one already. I'm thinking of putting them in the ground, as life in a pot is hard.
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