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  #41  
Old 10-29-2002, 02:38 PM
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d_kendal d_kendal is offline
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Hi Ken,

Welcome to RetouchPRO! very interesting to hear about the Rebel 2000, since that's the camera I'll most likely buy when I get my own. thanks for the tips.

- David
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  #42  
Old 10-31-2002, 04:04 PM
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paulette conlan paulette conlan is offline
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Hi
Need some advise. I want to use my Canon A1 to take some indoor action pictures. It will be a cheer leading demonstration in a room that will most likely have only natural lighting from the windows. They will be performing in front of the windows at the time of day when the sun will be coming in. I can't change that.

Anyway I thought I would use a 800 ASA film to avoid having to deal with flash reflections in the windows. Should that be enough to prevent blurring?

Also the camera has only manual focus and I have forgotten how to set a focus zone so that I don't have to fiddle around with focusing manually which is cumbersome when you wear glasses and the room is not that bright. I can't just do a set focus from a fixed stop since they'll be moving around the room .

Does anyone know the settings of a self focus cameras ? If I set it at 10 feet for example what shutter speed and aperature would I need to keep the subjects in focus from say 6 feet to 14 feet?

Any help would be appreciated.



Paulette
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  #43  
Old 10-31-2002, 06:26 PM
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I would be tempted if possible to get someone to stand where you think the most likely place for the models is - to help you focus for that point. Then do minor adjustments to your focus if and when nessasary.

Be aware of the shutter speed and make sure that your camera is set for the fore ground so that the windows do not produce an under exposed on the models - again this can be set by your subject standing in situe before the main shot. Setting a good depth of field will help general focus issues.

This has the potential for some really fantastic images - don't be afraid to experiment a little. A slight bluring of the clothing might add to the general feel of the images against the bright windows.

Good luck and I would be really interested in seeing some of your results
Clare

Sorry I can't help with the canon problem - I am sure someone here can give you some insight. Have you tried the canon web site to the give any info there?
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  #44  
Old 11-01-2002, 07:56 PM
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paulette conlan paulette conlan is offline
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Dear Clare,
Thank you for the advise. I think that it is the depth of field information that I was looking for. Have a good idea of what I want to do now. I can't tell you how much of a problem it is down here when you can't avoid having the windows in the background. The "sunshine of Florida" is aptly named.
I'll keep you posted.
Paulette
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  #45  
Old 11-01-2002, 08:27 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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Paulette,

I think maybe you want to use hyperfocal focusing in that situation. It's kind of difficult to explain without actually showing you, but I'll try...

If you look at your lens from the top, you should see some hyperfocal marks and lines (see attached image).

The hyperfocal numbers will correspond to your f-stops, and there will be 2 numbers for each f-stop - one on the left and one on the right.

Meter the light in the area you want to shoot and figure out what f-stop you will be using.

Focus your lens at the farthest point you want to be in focus and make a mental note of the distance. You should have meters, feet or both on your focus ring, and the distance you are focused at will be lined up with the center mark on your hyperfocal scale. Repeat for the nearest point you want to have in focus.

Set your farthest distance at the left hyperfocal mark that corresponds with the f-stop you'll be using (on some cameras I think this may be reversed and the farthest distance will be on the right instead of the left?). All of the distances that fall between the hyperfocal marks for the f-stop you'll be using will be in sharp focus.

With your farthest distance set to the left hyperfocal mark, if the closest distance you chose falls outside your right hand hyperfocal mark, you will need to choose a smaller aperture (bigger f-stop number) or limit your shooting area a bit more.

NOTE: When you look through your viewfinder, things will not LOOK like they're going to be in focus, but it DOES work - trust me!

The best way to prove this effect (if you want to test it in advance) is to go out and find some beautiful scenery on a nice bright f-16 day. Focus as you usually do for scenery and take a shot, then refocus by setting your infinity symbol on your left side f-16 hyperfocal mark and shoot the same scene again. You'll just be amazed at how much sharper the hyperfocal shot will be...!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hyperfocal lens.jpg (21.2 KB, 12 views)
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  #46  
Old 11-01-2002, 08:58 PM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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Jak has some good advice on hyperfocal focusing. I used to shoot weddings, and I'd use that technique when I would shoot the dance floor shots because it was fast shooting, and fairly dark (but I did use flash). I'm not sure if you realize this, but shutter speed has no effect on focus (but it does on movement). Pick the aperture you need, then while metering, you should know if your shutter speed is fast enough. If not, you will have to make adjustments on your aperture setting, which will influence the depth of field. I think Clare was saying to be sure the bright windows do not influence your meter reading, or you could have some very poor exposures. I think it would be good if you could visit the shooting area before the day of shooting, just to get an idea of what you'll run into. Be sure to take your camera to test things out if you go. Best of luck.

Ed
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  #47  
Old 11-02-2002, 12:47 AM
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CJ Swartz CJ Swartz is offline
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Paulette, don't know if it's allowed, but if you can position yourself next to the windows and shoot towards the cheerleaders USING the window light, but not INTO the window light, you'll have wonderful natural lighting and less concern about "blowing out" the highlights from the sunshine.
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  #48  
Old 11-02-2002, 12:34 PM
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paulette conlan paulette conlan is offline
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Thanks for all of the information.As I understand it now, the lower the aperature( higher f stop) the more that I will have a zone that will be in focus. What I have to do is get the highest possible shutter speed combined with the highest possible f stop to create an infocus zone.

I really can't do anything about where the group that I will be shooting will be positioning themself. It's the only place in the room where they can position themselves to perform.

Fortunately I 'll be able to try out some pictures in advance. I'd gotten so used to my digital camera that I've forgotten so much about using a "real" camera. Unfortunantly I find that my digital camera is not up to par with one of my "real" cameras when I do action photography. The shutter lag drives me crazy.

Paulette
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  #49  
Old 11-02-2002, 05:03 PM
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Ed_L Ed_L is offline
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Paulette,

If you find that you don't have quite enough light when you're shooting, you can always push the film (underexpose it) a stop or two, then have it processed as such. I'm not sure what the best film type would be for best results, but maybe someone else (Jak?) can shed some light on that subject. If not, the Kodak website should give you that kind of information (I think). Just remember that if you push film, you lose some quality. Just something else to think about if you run into trouble.

Ed
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  #50  
Old 11-02-2002, 09:51 PM
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Jakaleena Jakaleena is offline
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It's not usually a good idea to push process color film. BW film lends itself well to push processing, but pushing color film can give some unwanted color shifts and also enhances the grain quite a bit.

Color film has a great deal of latitude built into it and can usually be underexposed by a couple of stops without having to adjust the processing.

The following quote is from The Black & White Darkroom

Quote:
Black and white negative films and color reversal films (slides) can be push processed. Color print films however have a far greater latitude than do color slide films. A color print film can be incorrectly exposed by as much as 2 stops and still produce a satisfactory print using standard processing. Also when color print films are pushed, they may develop strange color casts which are difficult to correct. For these reasons, do not attempt this technique with color print films.
If you have access to the location before hand, it is a good idea to just go and make some test shots. I really do recommend using flash if at all possible. When I shoot rodeos indoors, I use Kodak Supra 800, a good flash, and the fastest shutter speed possible. I prefer 1/250 or better, but sometimes the fastest possible is only 1/125, but with good flash that's usually enough.

If 800 speed film isn't quite enough, Fuji makes a 1600 speed color film (although it is fairly grainy).
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