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incident while trying to print pics at store

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  #11  
Old 04-24-2004, 04:38 PM
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catia catia is offline
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Quote:
when someone comes in with a collage, or something that looks professionally done, who might have done it themselves, I ask them to produce the negatives as proof that the original image belongs to them.
And what pray tell do you ask for when someone like me who is all digital comes in? My response to you is similar to your response, "Who needs to do business with you?"

Catia
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  #12  
Old 04-24-2004, 07:09 PM
DigitalDevo DigitalDevo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsidemaurice
The smallest HP printer does better work than Walmart and costs almost nothing.
Not even possible. A normal inkjet can not even compare to a Dye Sub more or less a Fuji machine. The larger machines do not actually "print" the pictures. They use lasers to put the pigments onto the photographic paper and then are pput through a chemical process similiar to regular film developing/prints. Actually, "prints" on Fuji Crystal Archive paper will most likely last longer then a film "print".
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  #13  
Old 04-24-2004, 07:28 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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The smallest HP printer does better work than Walmart and costs almost nothing.
I have to disagree with you on both points. I'm am curious though, about why you feel this way.

I have an HP, and I have had prints done through Walmart and a few other places that use Fuji Frontier printers. There is no comparison. Other than a small proof, I would never sell anyone an inkjet print. Also, have you ever calculated the costs of ink and paper for the HP, or any other home printer? It's outrageous!

Don't get me wrong, I'm not defending "Walmart", but rather the process. There are plenty of other places to get Fuji Frontier prints.
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  #14  
Old 04-24-2004, 11:36 PM
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brandonx49 brandonx49 is offline
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This is hot topic today.

My experience with Walmart has been good. At 25 cents Canadian for a 4x6 matt or glossy I'm not complaining. To purchase an expensive consumer photo printer would be a matter of convience (debateable): the cost of ink, paper, hardware; calibration; troubleshooting is hardly worth it to me and I get along with computers pretty well.

Last week I actually went to all three places in town that do the fast one hour printing. I printed a variety of 4x6 images at these shops and the quality seemed pretty much the same. One place was 29 cents an image but they did it right when I was there. Impressive.

I still have yet to try the pro shop and print 8x10's for a true quality comparison.

Eventually I hope to sell my prints to clients. Are these hour shops good enough or should I go to a professional shop.??

Places like Ofoto - how does this compare to the Walmart quality??

Tx,
Brad
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  #15  
Old 04-25-2004, 12:58 AM
DigitalDevo DigitalDevo is offline
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Frankly, for selling prints I would want top notch. Shutterfly or someone who uses Fuji Crystal Archive paper on good machines! Or For super large format prints places like JumboGiant (also get canvas and watercolor prints made), or the Kodak E-Metallic paper is supposed to be super rgeat for portraits and B&W/Toned images.. Like from Mpix.. I just made an order to Mpix and am awaiting the arrival anxiously to see how this paper and their printing service stacks up. I have ordered 1000's of prints from Shutterfly with no problems at all
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  #16  
Old 04-25-2004, 07:00 PM
westsidemaurice westsidemaurice is offline
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Cool

If quality is important, you want control. That means you will print it yourself. If your customers want quick and cheap and if you enjoy hanging around Walmart, have fun.
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  #17  
Old 04-25-2004, 08:02 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
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If quality is important, you want control. That means you will print it yourself. If your customers want quick and cheap and if you enjoy hanging around Walmart, have fun.
I disagree with your logic, but to each his own.
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  #18  
Old 04-26-2004, 11:51 AM
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Juliana Ross Juliana Ross is offline
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You want good quality, you need to find a tech who knows what they are doing.

The fuji Frotier can produce some great prints but the machine is only as good as the person sitting there doing the corrections.

In eight years working as an assitant lab manger at a retailer you would not believe how many techs I had to re train because they knew little or nothing about the colour theory involved in printing.

Alot of the machines can produce a semi passable print on the full auto setting, but if it is quality you want find an operator who knows the nuts and bolts behind printing. Both Fuji and Kodak are guilty of selling thier systems under the premise that anyone can operate the machine. Indeed this is true, but I would challenge the quality .....I do not think someone who simply runs production will provide a superior print....

And a tech point on the Frontier....it operates with three solid state lasers which do an exposure direct on the paper, the dye layers are actually built into the photo paper as they always have.......
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  #19  
Old 04-26-2004, 12:13 PM
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Chip Hildreth Chip Hildreth is offline
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This is a topic worth exploring more methodically, if I knew a way to collect the wisdom here and... wait, I've got an idea. I'll try a survey, but first, my two cents on this thread.

This is actually about an eight cent response (kinda long), I still haven't learned to edit myself very well in these forums.

COPYRIGHTS: Copyrights are synonymous to profit (wages) to professional photographers, artists, musicians and other independent creative types. I'm for them and I'm glad that mini-labs and companies like Wal-Mart respect them. A lot of nice folks simply don't understand that copying someone's work impinges on their livelyhood. Copyrights are really confusing, to explain anyway, nobody can easily understand an comply with them. ...This could be discussed for a long time so I'm gonna cut it right here.

PRINTING: This is about as subjective a subject as you are going to find. Getting a pleasing photographic print is not hard. Inkjets will do it, lasers will do it, dye subs will do it, photochemical will do it. In every case the media combination, that is, the ink/toner/film and the paper are the crucial components and they must be engineered to work together to get a nice print.
If your digital file is good, you can print well without using color profiles. What you CAN'T do, without lots of good luck anyway, is MATCH color from one media and/or printer to the next. Even with good profiles and densitometers and whatnot, you still can't match perfectly because inks, papers and processes vary in which colors they can actually print.

I've seen plenty of good prints from HP desktop printers, but I wouldn't sell them because they are not archival the ink will run if they get wet; Customers don't expect that and they will be hacked off if their print bleeds off onto the table because some Diet Coke splashed on it.

Dye Sub prints are far more resilient and make nice richly saturated prints but I don't like them because I can't afford to buy a dye sub printer or the consummables they use. They are, however, a reliable mainstay for mini-labs doing picture packages and for the kiosk printing business. They are desined to serve a large, primarily consumer oreinted market. The Wal-mart thing is out for me for a number of reasons, not the least of which is me being a control freak when it comes to technology. I have to print my own stuff so I can go straight to the source and dog-cuss when something goes wacky
.
Photo chemical is the way to print if you have a chrome or a negative but that's not the usual case anymore.

Color lasers make nice gift and business card printers but they don't reproduce color well enough to make sellable photo prints.

Archival inkjets produce high quality prints on a variety of media. When it comes to art reproduction, that is, signed, limited edition prints on artist's media like canvas or watercolor paper, archival inkjets are the clear choice. They make excellent photographic printers and you can sell the prints with confidence that they will endure anything a photochemical print will. However, like Vicki pointed out, ink cartridges will send you to the poor house. You can win this though... I'll leave a hint here and you can do your own research... Mediastreet.com - Niagara II. It works, we use them and ink cost is hardly a factor anymore.


Digital printing is in it's infancy... no, make that adolescence...
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  #20  
Old 04-26-2004, 02:09 PM
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Juliana Ross Juliana Ross is offline
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I sure hope no one took my explanation of the lasers in the Frontier and equated that to home laser printers...they are two totally different animals

The Frontier is by far the best industrial machine I have worked on. For a better explanation, the printer works under the same principals as the timed light with filtration exposures. The difference here is that the exposure is made with the solid state lasers (like the big sci fi kind of lasers).

The paper is still wet process like usual
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