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Turning Portraits into Digital Sketches, Oils, Watercolors Thinking about expanding beyond your traditional portrait and/or restoration, retouching and colorizing black and white image services? Find out what others are doing and how they are doing it.

Creative Portraits-Tintype Lady

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  #1  
Old 11-01-2004, 05:39 PM
ahutton ahutton is offline
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Creative Portraits-Tintype Lady

Here's a nice tintype of an elegant young lady. Should provide us with some interesting portraits.

AmyHutton
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File Type: jpg victorianladyorig.jpg (26.9 KB, 108 views)
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Old 11-04-2004, 10:29 AM
jaykita jaykita is offline
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Hi! I'm a bit too early for this party!
Started out with quick masks and coloring of individual features with image-adj-color balance. Also blank layers and color blends for lips and face. A layer of filter-render clouds, overlay blend. Merge layers, then buzzpro with simplifier3, and mono edges. Lastly render lighting effects omni, intensity 25, color greenish gold.
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File Type: jpg victorianlady-web.jpg (28.7 KB, 67 views)
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  #3  
Old 11-04-2004, 12:55 PM
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DannyRaphael DannyRaphael is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaykita
Hi! I'm a bit too early for this party!
Started out with quick masks and coloring of individual features with image-adj-color balance. Also blank layers and color blends for lips and face. A layer of filter-render clouds, overlay blend. Merge layers, then buzzpro with simplifier3, and mono edges. Lastly render lighting effects omni, intensity 25, color greenish gold.
Simply: Marvelous.
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Old 11-04-2004, 08:03 PM
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DannyRaphael DannyRaphael is offline
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Inspired by jaykita's fine effort, I took a stab at colorization, too. I don't do this type of thing very often.

It was very thoughtful of people from this era to frequently wear clothing without patterns!

I, too, used several layers set to blend mode = Color and grouped (clipped) Hue/Sat adjustment layers to fine tune colors. I used a Channel Mixer adjustment layer for to get the black hair, white lace around her neck and white around her eyes.

~Danny~
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File Type: jpg Tin Type Lady djr.jpg (84.3 KB, 62 views)
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Old 11-05-2004, 03:52 AM
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Neve Neve is offline
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Kudos....excellent results!
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  #6  
Old 11-05-2004, 04:48 AM
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Neve Neve is offline
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Thanks Amy, you're right, this is an interesting one and Jaykita started it off with the right idea. Extra work required for this one for certain. I just generally added colour. Decided to smudge her hair (for practice). Smudged her face too. Added a slight WC effect. Used a sponge brush for the bg.
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File Type: jpg Victorian.jpg (92.7 KB, 31 views)
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Old 11-05-2004, 09:50 AM
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Janet Petty Janet Petty is offline
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Tintype no more

The list of what I actually did is too long to type. Suffice it to say that there are around 25 colors in her face alone. I added an auburn highlight to her hair, a blue highlight to the dress, fixed breakfast and took 19 pictures of Mr/Mrs Groundhog kissing in the backyard. Came back looked, at the final and added the vignette. Called it quits and posted the young lady onto the forum.

The second picture was created using the impressionist filter at the watercolor wash setting and image instead of sepia. I applied that twice and each time erased the parts that detracted from the overall effect. The last step was to fix some sort of background. I did that by using the Art History brush with the picture flipped horizontally so the strokes were not so linear.

Enjoy,

Janet
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File Type: jpg victorianladyColorized.jpg (99.2 KB, 36 views)
File Type: jpg Colorize.jpg (75.1 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg Painted.jpg (98.0 KB, 42 views)

Last edited by Janet Petty; 11-05-2004 at 10:17 AM.
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  #8  
Old 11-05-2004, 11:13 AM
ahutton ahutton is offline
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Beautiful renditions all!

I didn't add any colors to mine. This is some of the best antique tinting I've found, and on a tintype, no less. Tintypes are hard to color by hand. I just saturated the lips a bit more. (Probably more than she would have liked for her time period.)

I ran PSP8 Clarify, then buzzed, then clarify, the impressioinst, merged layers, and sharpened, sharpend, sharpened for texture.

I cropped it down because even with reducing the pixels count I couldn't get it small enough for upload.

AmyHutton
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File Type: jpg victlady3.jpg (92.8 KB, 28 views)
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  #9  
Old 11-05-2004, 03:58 PM
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GOLDCOIN GOLDCOIN is offline
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Thanks Amy...Was fun to play with this treasure.

Use Trimoon's technique with the history brush, then made a pattern and did a Wow watercolor.
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File Type: jpg young-girl-Danny-orignuploa.jpg (88.7 KB, 34 views)
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  #10  
Old 11-05-2004, 08:52 PM
jaykita jaykita is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahutton
Tintypes are hard to color by hand.

AmyHutton
Hi Amy. Not really knowing about the "TINTYPE" process, and driven by your comment, I decided to find out some on the subject. So for those who would like to know....
"A wet-plate collodion process produced on a thin iron plate--named the melainotype (melaino, meaning dark or black) or ferrotype (ferro, referring to iron) and popularly called the tintype--was developed in Ohio in the early 1850s.
The six basic steps involved in the tintype process were: coating, sensitizing, exposing, developing, fixing, and washing the metallic plate.

A highly toxic and inflammable collodion solution of pyroxyline (nitrocellulose commonly called guncotton), alcohol, and ether was applied to the thin enameled (japanned) black iron plate immediate prior to exposure.

After the collodion had semi-hardened to a tacky surface, the plate was sensitized in an "exciting" bath consisting of silver nitrate, potassium iodide, nitric acid, and distilled water. The plate was lifted from the bath carefully (splashing of excess silver nitrate caused dark spots to emerge on the finished image) and allowed to drain briefly before being placed in a covered plate holder, known as a photographic frame.

Once the subject was set, the photographer needed to place the wet, sensitized plate in the camera, lift the plate holder's cover, remove the lens cap, and determine the correct timing for the exposure. By 1872 exposure time for the tintype, highly dependent on the amount of available light, varied between three and twenty seconds. After the lens was capped, the exposed plate was closed off in the photographic frame, removed from the camera, and returned to the darkroom for the next stage of the process--development.

The developing solution was a mixture of water, ferrous sulfate, and glacial acid. In the darkroom the operator removed the plate from the photographic frame, placed the plate, collodion side up, in a tray containing the developing solution, and rocked it gently to prevent uneven processing. After development, the plate was immediately and thoroughly washed with water and deposited in a tray of fixing solution that made the image permanent by removing the unexposed silver. Another highly toxic chemical solution, potassium cyanide, was used for the final fixing step. The plate was then dried and often coated with varnish to preserve the image."
Excerpt taken from "Lost and Found - Discovering early photographic processes"
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