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Would you provide your layered files?

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  #21  
Old 10-12-2005, 05:38 PM
emarts emarts is offline
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Of course that is for contracted work not work-for-hire.

If I work as a freelancer at my client's premises, am I entitled to all the work I left on his computer or is it his property?
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  #22  
Old 10-12-2005, 05:39 PM
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goose443 goose443 is offline
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Well said Craig.

Releasing native files is a whole service in and of itself and should be billed and contracted as such.
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  #23  
Old 10-12-2005, 09:21 PM
emarts emarts is offline
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I guess for me, it just depends on the nature of the work. If I was doing a restoration job, I probably wouldn't hand over the layered file without extra compensation. But in that instance, no one has asked for a layered file.

In my commercial work, I include the layered file as part of the product/service I deliver. Just a little incentive to use my services over someone else, I guess. And it doesn't cost me anything. Plus I don't take on the responsibility of having to archive (although I always do).

Here's an example: I do a lot of retouching of cars. I'll create a mask around the car so that the background could easily be changed, or the color of the car can be changed, or tweaked. Or the hubcaps need to be swapped, but the client hasn't decided yet on which hubcaps to use. Should the bumpers be chrome or painted? Tone down the reflections, but don't take them completely out. Wait, no, take them out. Tint the windows 80%. No I said 80%. No, that's not 80%. Oh, it is? Okay, tint the windows 60%.

All these adjustments are done on layers. I will hand over the layered file because both the client and I know that something will change at the last minute. This is the service I provide for them. I guess, in a way you can say they are already paying for the layered file from the start, since it was never actually considered an extra. If the client only asked to change the color of the car, I suppose I would hand over a flattened image and charge them a minimal fee. And if they came back and asked me to change it again, I would charge for the revision. But that's not my usual workflow.

I forgot that most people here are doing restoration work, which I don't do a lot of. I guess that makes a difference.
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  #24  
Old 10-13-2005, 11:32 AM
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RichardBrackin RichardBrackin is offline
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Allow me to approach this from a different perspective.

In my line of work, layered files are almost a necessity. We do a lot of vehicle wraps where we have to move items around slightly so as to miss hardware on the vehicles.

We ask for layered files. 90 percent of the time the agencies we deal with have no issue with it. Every once in a while we run across a difficult customer who doesn't know us and understandably wouldn't trust us.

If at first we don't get the layered files, we have the customer sign a document releasing us from all liability if the image doesn't fit the vehicle.

In this line of work, nearly every person who has sent us flattened files has gotten burned. What happens is the installer gets on site and the designer has put an element that gets lost in the door handle or on the car tag.
They have to pay the installer to stay an extra day or two (very very expensive) while they redo the art and send it back to us to re-print.

So, there are certainly instances where layered files are a must.
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  #25  
Old 10-13-2005, 12:25 PM
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goose443 goose443 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardBrackin
So, there are certainly instances where layered files are a must.
Right, But in this instance the service you are providing includes the need for editability. Editability is one of the values that is contracted for... and should be compensated for also. Besides, your layers are elements that might need to be reposiitoned. For example, I assume if you did a car wrap with a photograph of a woman you had retouched, you would not need to include all the adjustment layers and layers used to retouch the face. These would not be needed when laying out the wrap to fit the car. In this instance the layers control changes in layout and not in the quality of the photographs. It may sound like a minor point but it actually makes quite a bit of difference.
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