RetouchPRO

Go Back   RetouchPRO > Business > Work/Jobs
Register Blogs FAQ Site Nav Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Work/Jobs Talk about the business side of things. Advice, questions, inspiration, and moral support

How would you handle it?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 01-06-2002, 09:38 PM
Ed_L's Avatar
Ed_L Ed_L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: northwest Indiana, about 45 minutes from Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,824
Surely something like that could apply to many businesses. Maybe clothes left at a dry cleaners or something similar. It shouldn't be hard to find out what the laws are for something of this nature.

Ed
Reply With Quote top
  #22  
Old 01-06-2002, 10:05 PM
DJ Dubovsky's Avatar
DJ Dubovsky DJ Dubovsky is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Upper Penninsula of Michigan
Posts: 1,659
To be on the safe side, before discarding the items left behind by customers, remember to document your attempts to contact the individuals to pick up the items. The best way to do this is to make copies of your correspondences with the customer stating the deadline for picking up their items and the ultimate loss if they choose not to. Then send them registered return reciept mail. This creates a paper trail of your sincerity to return the items involved and it also proves that they recieved these letters and chose to disreguard them. I would give them a safe time limit of 30 days upon reciept of your letter as a safe time.
DJ
Reply With Quote top
  #23  
Old 01-07-2002, 01:41 PM
Mike Mike is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Grand Junction CO USA
Posts: 683
<If you've been in the restoration business for 20 years, I'm wondering if you do all restorations digitally now or if you offer other services as well. Ed>

I hope that you are not too confused here, we have been operating a photo studio for 20 years and have always offered copy services. We contracted out all retouching and restoration work when we first started. We had a lot of customers that just wanted copies, with no other work required. We started digital services about 4 years ago and started doing more and more of our retouch/restoration type work ourselves. I think that this is rather typical of a lot of photo studios that have entered into the magic kingdom of 1's and 0's.

The decsion to use or not use digital depends on the job. Since most of our jobs seem to be original prints smaller than 8x10 and they usually want their finished product about the same size, then digital is a really great tool. However we do get a larger size original now and then, with a final product that sometimes gets as large as 16x20 or bigger. Then we have a debate about the best way to do the job. Several years ago (when digital was much newer) we had such a job and the people who did it for us did it both digitaly and with film, and in this case the film was somewhat better.

I really think that digital is really a great tool, but then again so is film. I never met a good carpenter that only had 1 hammer or 1 saw, so why should I only have 1 camera or 1 way to do a task?
One should be able to look at the task and pick the best tool to work with.
_____________

Customers not picking up work is not a new problem. Years ago we went to a 50% prepay just to make sure that we would at least not lose any money on the job. We even have a complete set of proofs from a wedding that the bride and groom (nor anybody else from their families) have ever seen. I think the marriage was over quicker than the 10 days or so it took to get the proofs done!!!

Making a contract, with some kind of time limit inserted in there might work, but if you want to do that, I would write something up, then go buy an hour of some lawyers time to make sure it is going to work in your location. If you put it in writing, then it had better be right or your XXX is hanging out for someone to bite on!



Mike
Reply With Quote top
  #24  
Old 01-07-2002, 03:00 PM
Ed_L's Avatar
Ed_L Ed_L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: northwest Indiana, about 45 minutes from Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,824
All very good points. It seems to be that getting half down is getting to be headed toward the norm rather than the exception for many different service related businesses. And there's good reason for that.

Out of curiosity, do you normally use medium format for copy jobs?

Ed
Reply With Quote top
  #25  
Old 01-07-2002, 05:05 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 883
Another idea,
What about adding a $NTE line?
Reply With Quote top
  #26  
Old 01-07-2002, 05:30 PM
Mike Mike is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Grand Junction CO USA
Posts: 683
Ed
When we used film, we used Kodak Techical Pan, a film that is virtually grainless. I preferred to use 35mm if I could (it would make great 16x20's) but if my retoucher needed to do any work on the negatives before we printed them, then we would use medium format.

Vikki
OK, I give up, what does $NTE stand for? And if you think I get confused here, you should see me trying to figure out some of plates people put on their cars!!!!!

Mike
Reply With Quote top
  #27  
Old 01-07-2002, 08:43 PM
Vikki Vikki is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 883
I'm sorry.
It's: "Not To Exceed" a specific dollar amount.
Reply With Quote top
  #28  
Old 02-06-2002, 10:30 AM
Jim Conway's Avatar
Jim Conway Jim Conway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Oregon City, Oregon
Posts: 212
Work a system

I guess the best you can expect here is called experience. You'll waste more energy and money trying to collect or trying to prove you are right than it's worth. We don't have the problem because we work with signed orders and 50% deposits on individuals and purchase orders from business and institutions.

Spelling everything out up front is essential. If the job is too complex for a firm estimate up front we take it a step at a time -charge the customer for a negative, cleaning, testing and a proof - show the proof print and go from there. On oil paintings and other high ticket jobs we take the same approach and show the prints before we continue on to the art work phase. Customers appreciate this and often never look at the proofs believe it or not - when you call and tell them to come in and take a look the rest of the job for example, will be another $270 ...they will usually say "Oh that's OK, I'm sure you'll do it the best way - just go ahead with it" and give us the bank card authorization for the added cost to finish the work on the phone. .

All of this doesn't mean that we don't have a pile of prints accumulated over the years that have never been picked up that we still have money due on (and many more that are paid in full) but we just keep reminding the customers from time to time and don't push it at all - and we never release the originals unless the full order has been paid. Learning that "the customer is always right" isn't easy but it's a good way to stay in business so my take on this would be to bite the bullet and smile! Give the client back his original while you are still smiling and go to work on the systems you are using by convincing yourself that the customer was not at fault!

Jim Conway
Reply With Quote top
  #29  
Old 02-06-2002, 10:44 AM
Jim Conway's Avatar
Jim Conway Jim Conway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Oregon City, Oregon
Posts: 212
I forgot the insurance! As some of you already know from my previous posts elsewhere in this forum, we insure the customers originals while they are in our care (from $200 up) per order.

If the prints are not picked up in a few weeks, we send out a letter stating that our coverage is not valid on any order or original left in our care for over 90 days and we can no longer be responsible for them in any way after (date).

In the case of prints left for estimates, that's reduced to 30 days.

It's an effective reminder!

Jim Conway
Reply With Quote top
  #30  
Old 02-06-2002, 02:38 PM
Doug Nelson's Avatar
Doug Nelson Doug Nelson is offline
Janitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,068
Blog Entries: 21
Jim:

Do us all a favor and start a new thread about how to insure a user's originals. I wouldn't have a clue how to even start doing something like that.
Reply With Quote top
Reply

  RetouchPRO > Business > Work/Jobs


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to handle this situation? grafx Work/Jobs 18 02-19-2006 05:59 AM
How do you handle client approvals for restoration work? Gerry Monaghan Work/Jobs 18 01-11-2006 10:48 AM
Dark eyes...how would you handle it? pstewart Image Help 12 12-09-2002 10:33 PM
How do YOU handle swatches in Photoshop winwintoo Software 12 08-23-2002 09:44 PM
How would you handle it? Ed_L Salon 13 06-20-2002 12:06 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2016 Doug Nelson. All Rights Reserved