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Business Code of Ethics

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  #1  
Old 05-10-2003, 01:10 PM
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KevinBE KevinBE is offline
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Business Code of Ethics

Thought I would start this off. We talked about this subject in a previous post in the wrong forum. I'll show my ignorance in my first three questions.

Do you archive your customer files after the restoration job is complete?

How long do you keep customer files before distroying them?

When you purchase a copyright release for a customer, doesn't that release belong to the customer?
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Old 05-10-2003, 05:46 PM
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Sanda Sanda is offline
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quick answers
1 yes, most definately
2 forever
3 it belongs to the customer
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Old 05-10-2003, 08:02 PM
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Thanks for your answers Sanda. Hopefully others will follow suit.
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Old 05-11-2003, 10:07 PM
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I agree. I do the same thing. It's the right thing to do. Unfortunately, some among us want to "get rich" off of every little thing. What happens if you die tomorrow and the customer needs reprints of the retouched photo in a few years? If they don't have a CD of the final art, they are out of luck.

Eric
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Old 05-13-2003, 09:40 PM
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Thanks Eric for your reply. I was hoping for more respondents. maybe some others will come around. I tend to think that there are others that might have other proceedures.
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Old 05-13-2003, 10:43 PM
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It depends on the customer and the reason for the restoration. A normal restoration, I don't keep the files once I have given them to the customer, both in print and on computer. (Keep it maybe a few weeks, till I'm sure their happy)

When I've done one of my funeral type restorations, I tend to keep it for 3 or 4 months, so that other members of the family can purchase copies if they would like.

Exceptions - long time customers that aren't very computer literate. I know they'll lose the file and want another sometime in the future. I've got some stuff I've kept for 3 or 4 years.

And I've never purchased a copyright for a customer, but my thought would be that it belongs to them.
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Old 05-13-2003, 11:55 PM
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Hey Kevin,

So far we have all of the restorations that we have done, on hard drive or on a CD in a customer file. After 3 years I would conitnue to keep them only if it is convenient for us. On a related note, we have not yet had anyone ask for a CD, but if they did we would give them one.

We have not yet purchased a copyright for anyone ...

Roger
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Old 05-13-2003, 11:58 PM
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I'm not sure I understand the point on the copyright question Kevin ??? A copyright release that has been obtained to do work for a customer is normally a part of the work under contract, paid for by the client, and would go as an attachment to the original. Most that I've obtained are one time rights so expire anyway. If, however, it was an open end assignment on a specific photo, it would be like a "certificate of authenticity" that as far as I can see would hold no value unless you are also holding some rights to further publication of the original.

I do believe I covered the other topics in that "wrong forum" post right! :-) In an abbreviated repeat, I'm a firm believer in the idea that no one should keep any of the customers "belongings" - negatives, CD or other means of duplicating the original until and unless you have a release from the client and we will not sub out any assignments to any lab, retoucher, artist or other service that does not agree to adhere to that ethical standard in a written policy or agreement.

Jim Conway
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Old 05-14-2003, 12:15 AM
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I'm going to toss out a few for consideration. The rule in conservation is that anything you do to an original must be reversible, yet we get in Dags and Ambros in here all the time that people (in this business) have taken out of the cases to scan - the result is sometime disastrous. How do set a policy for handling originals and what do you do when things go wrong?

Here's another common one: When you promise a "toned print" that looks like a historic sepia, or you offer to duplicate the "look" of other historic processes like tintypes, do you give the clients a "true explanation" of the processes that you intend to use and explain the differences including the lasting qualities? One of our primary exhibits in our showroom points up this bit of subterfuge in orders from other sources in our area - showing true gold or selenium tone prints along side of their ink-jet counterparts. It's very effective!

Lots to discuss here and I hope others will jump in on this - some of the ethics issues are easy to call as black or white but there are a lot of gray areas that call for some deep thinking.

Jim Conway
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  #10  
Old 05-14-2003, 12:35 PM
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Perhaps this is being posted under the wrong section and should be under Education - in any event, here is the link that I think everyone that touches any historic photos should at least read once!

http://aic.stanford.edu/pubs/ethics.html

The AIC CODE OF ETHICS AND GUIDELINES FOR PRACTICE was years in the making and very applicable to photo retouchers and restorers who are working at any level now or those that are just starting out and contemplating offering their services to the public.

Jim Conway
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