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  • Asked to do more -- negotiate higher salary?

    I currently work as a basic photo editor. Recently I have been asked to do higher end retouching-- heavy image manipulation and beauty changes, not the simple sharpening/color correction as usual. They seem pleased at the results.

    My dilemna is this... I have very little related work experience outside of my current job and I have never taken any retouching classes or had any professional training. Browsing posts here, it seems that most people suggest that $30 is a reasonable rate for a good retoucher. I make about half that. I feel that I am pretty good, but I know experience does matter in money.

    Should I point out my new "job description" and try and renegotiate my salary? Or should I even go so far as to refuse to do that type of work unless I am compensated justly, if I bring up salary negotiation and they refuse it? I don't want to be taken advantage of, but would it be better, career-wise, to just do the work and perhaps have them realize they should move me into a different position title?

  • #2
    By your own admission "recently ... have been asked to do higher end retouching..."

    Maybe your boss is testing to see if you can handle "higher end" work...
    I would do the work for a couple months and enjoy the opportunity to be exposed to more chanllenging work. I would do my best, gain experience and then in a couple of months have a little talk with the manager.

    Originally posted by Tig
    I currently work as a basic photo editor. Recently I have been asked to do higher end retouching-- heavy image manipulation and beauty changes, not the simple sharpening/color correction as usual. They seem pleased at the results.

    My dilemna is this... I have very little related work experience outside of my current job and I have never taken any retouching classes or had any professional training. Browsing posts here, it seems that most people suggest that $30 is a reasonable rate for a good retoucher. I make about half that. I feel that I am pretty good, but I know experience does matter in money.

    Should I point out my new "job description" and try and renegotiate my salary? Or should I even go so far as to refuse to do that type of work unless I am compensated justly, if I bring up salary negotiation and they refuse it? I don't want to be taken advantage of, but would it be better, career-wise, to just do the work and perhaps have them realize they should move me into a different position title?

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    • #3
      I agree with Frank. Also, this is a good chance to add to your portfolio. If things don't work out, you'll have ample samples for other opportunites in the job market.
      ~Nancy~

      __________________________________________

      www.fixthepixs.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I will also agree with the above. Sounds like you may be being tested on your skill level. Now is the time to shine and do work that blows the higher paid guys out of the water. Then when the word gets back to the bosses, you make your move and request a pay review
        Be ready for some people to be upset by the fact that you can do the same or better work than them, when you are not on the same pay level as them. This is your career and your life, so step on as many toes as you need to, in order to get to the places you want to be If they can't stand the heat, they shouldn't be in the kitchen

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        • #5
          I have to say that as a manager of retouchers, I believe that chrishoggy's advice is off-center. I agree that if you show that you have initiative, and are increasing your skills, you'll be rewarded...but if you work with others in your shop to help build their skills as well, you show that you understand business as well as Photoshop. Only step on toes deliberately to edge a competing business out of a job; stepping on your co-workers unravels the team and shows that you don't see the big picture...

          Negotiation is a better bet than refusal to work; the latter puts you at odds with management in a no-win scenario. No one will offer to pay you a higher rate until they can see whether you're up to the challenge.


          The asking rate also depends on what city/market you're in...

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