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    Whether or not you agree with the administration's position on Iraq, let them know by registering to vote if you're not already a registered voter. It couldn't be easier. Go to this site, and you will be able to register by filling out a form for your state. You then send it to the address indicated. That's all there is to it. Less than 10 minutes, and you can have your say.

    Ed

  • #2
    Do a large proportion of the US population not take part in elections Ed?

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    • #3
      True Chris. It's voter apathy. Many people don't feel as though their vote will make any difference one way or the other. I don't know the percentage of registered voters, but I do know that there's a good number of people who are not registered to vote, so therefore, they are not able to express their opinions in the voting booth. This is a basic right of the citizens, and more needs to be done to get them out to vote. Not only in times like this, but also in everyday life as we knew it.

      Ed

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      • #4
        I know percentage of people voting in local elections is very low but I think its been going up in General Elections over here. I think in some countries it an offence not to vote but not sure which ones.

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        • #5
          it's compulsory to vote here in Australia although it doesn't mean we get any better politicians.

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          • #6
            Dare I ask what happens if you dont make it to the polling station?

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            • #7
              > [Chris] I think its been going up in General Elections over here.

              Surely you remember the cataclysmic, world-is-about-to-end, end-of-society-as-we-know it news reports that followed the low turnout in the 2001 election?

              For interest, the figures over the years are:

              1918: 58.9%
              1922: 71.3%
              1924: 70.8%
              1927: 76.6%
              1931: 76.3%
              1935: 71.2%
              1945: 72.7%
              1950: 84.0%
              1951: 82.5%
              1955: 76.7%
              1959: 78.8%
              1964: 77.1%
              1966: 75.8%
              1970: 72.0%
              1974 (Feb): 78.7%
              1974 (Oct): 72.8%
              1979: 76.0%
              1983: 72.7%
              1987: 75.3%
              1992: 77.7%
              1997: 71.5%
              2001: 59.0% (aha! we still beat 1918 by 0.1%!)

              So, effectively, it fluctuates a lot...

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              • #8
                Must reflect the choice on offer in 2001 Leah !

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                • #9
                  The Center for Voting and Democracy, and the Midwest Democracy Center asked our young people why voter turnout was so low in our country. This was a contest for young people to participate in. Here's a link to a site where you can read a sampling of the answers. I found it quite interesting myself, although I only read part of it.

                  Ed

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                  • #10
                    "The people that one bestowed commands, consulships, legions, and all else, now concerns itself no more, and longs eagerly for just two things - bread and circuses!"
                    Juvenal (55 AD - 127 AD), Satires

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                    • #11
                      Voter turnout in American elections has plunged in recent years, but the drop has been particularly pronounced among the young. In fact, turnout among senior citizens has increased since 1972, even as turnout dropped from 50% to 32% among citizens aged 18 to 24 and from 71% to 49% among citizens aged 25 to 44.
                      Center for voting and democracy

                      Of the 40 million registered voters who did not vote, about one-third claimed they wer too busy or had conflicting work or school schedules. Another 13 % did not vote because they were not interested or felt their vote would not make a difference. Some were too ill, out of town or had family emergencies. Other specified reasons for not voting included not liking the candidates or campaign issues (6 %),forgetting (5 %),confusion about registration (4 %),and transportation problems (2 %).

                      Chris -- not even one mentioned going to the circus or going to eat!

                      Might be good that those "confused about registration" and "forgetting" did NOT vote...?

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                      • #12
                        Bread and Circuses were free of charge to Roman Citizens CJ a ploy by the Emperors to keep their minds off revolt!

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                        • #13
                          Dare I ask what happens if you dont make it to the polling station?
                          There are fines for not voting but I'm not sure how vigorously they are pursued

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