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Stock photography shortcomings

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  • Stock photography shortcomings

    My job requires I find - and use - lots of stock imagery. Sadly, much of it falls short of my clients needs. Here's a case of an injured soccer player soccer being helped off the field. My client (soccer fanatics and medical trainers) were quick to point out that no-one would ever carry off an injured player with one hand in his crotch. Needed corrected - and while I was at it, they thought a South American ethnicity would be best for their ad.
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  • #2
    Re: Stock photography shortcomings

    Well, you did a good job. If you don't like what you're doing, move on up.

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    • #3
      Re: Stock photography shortcomings

      You are right Skoobey. I actually do like what i do, but I guess I was just commenting on how initially we all thought Stock would put us out of business. Instead, it created a niche market, because Art Directors simply can't find "exactly" what they need. I believe I was enamored with this particular example (recently done) and wanted to share that sentiment. But I believe it is misplaced. Not a good category and maybe not even a good share.

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      • #4
        Re: Stock photography shortcomings

        There is stock, and then there is stock. You can buy more expensive, and better looking images, they are on offer out there(agencies offer them, and even some stock sites represent well known photographers), but because noone is a fool, if you want a good product, you'll pay for it, be it custom or stock.

        Just like everyone thought outsourcing will bankrupt the companies, and instead it made them more profitable. It's the law of nature. Quality is always appreciated.

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        • #5
          Re: Stock photography shortcomings

          Skoobey... you are certainly right about that. I work for a big medical corporation - who has dozens of divisions and costs centers. They are not afraid to spend money on stock like Getty, and others when warranted, but generally ThinkStock is acceptable for most collateral that has a shelf life of maybe a month - if it hasn't found it's way to be circular filing cabinet prior. We even bought the licensed use of a specific artist's anatomy illustration for 3K for one year's use.

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