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Why HDR with samples

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  • Why HDR with samples

    CJ Swartz posted a good definition of what HDR means.

    I want to try to post a couple of visual examples of what it does. I will post three images. One a regular image captured and saved in camera as a jpeg. One from an HDR image made up of the first picture and another one both taken on a tripod with exposure bracketing. I only used 2 images, you can use 3, consensus is that more is overkill.
    The procedure with both images was exactly the same; bring into Photoshop, drop all color out with HS slider, auto color. That's it.
    The third image is the color HDR. I uploaded the two in BW so that you can see the difference in tonal ranges between the two. Your monitor cannot show you all of them and that's part of why the full color probably looks way oversaturated with blown highlights.
    The HDR is the one I marked up.
    You'll see in the HDR black and white image that there is much more detail shading between black and white and that black and white seem to have magically gotten farther apart (greater dynamic range.) The links are below and I posted the full size files so if you have dial-up now is a good time for coffee.
    On a side note, don't know if everyone knows this; most sites resize images for screen sizes, if you click on the little square at the lower right corner of the picture (it will appear when you mouse over it) it will take the image to actual size.
    Hope this is usefull, and thanks for looking.

    (BTW CJ, about animals sitting still- John Audubon (like in Audubon Society) drew thousands of birds, every one of which he hunted and killed first )


    http://aycu03.webshots.com/image/341...1478611_rs.jpg

    http://aycu18.webshots.com/image/327...7608686_rs.jpg

    http://aycu15.webshots.com/image/333...2744530_rs.jpg

  • #2
    Re: Why HDR with samples

    Originally posted by crazyfly1 View Post

    (BTW CJ, about animals sitting still- John Audubon (like in Audubon Society) drew thousands of birds, every one of which he hunted and killed first )
    Crazyfly1, I hope you're not suggesting I do the same?

    Thanks to you and Doug, we now have a new forum dedicated to the study and sharing of HDRI / tonemapping information. I've been busy with work, and haven't given enough time to following your links etc. yet, but thank you for giving us a start.

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