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  • Annoying Blur

    I gotta quick question. I have like 4 softboxes in my "home studio." Here's the problem-When i take pictures my subjects are usually moving a tiny bit. Therefore they usually come out a bit blurry looking. I do not use the flash on my camera because then the pictures have that "flash look." The 4 softboxes I have are like video lights-meaning they stay on they dont flash when I click. So how do i go about doing these shots like when hair is blowing or something. I photographed little children and they dont stay still. I have the nikon d200. I don't know if there's image stabilization that i need or what.Thank You.

    Here are some examples.
    www.videoav.runtwo.com/DSC_0228.JPG

    www.videoav.runtwo.com/DSC_0391.JPG

    www.videoav.runtwo.com/DSC_0410.JPG

    www.videoav.runtwo.com/DSC_0467.JPG

  • #2
    A flash is just a very bright light. Multiple flashes can be used just like floods. If you're getting some sort of "flash look", I'd suggest you check into more advanced flash usage.

    Try using 3 flashes, positioned just as you would floods. You can even use the floods as modelling lights. Dial down the power on 2 of the flashes so that you have one key flash, one fill flash, and perhaps one background or backlight flash. This is just one technique, there are many, many others.
    Learn by teaching
    Take responsibility for learning

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    • #3
      No flash

      I don't have flash lights. I have 4 softboxes that are constantly on. They don't flash when I click the camera. They are like video lights.

      Comment


      • #4
        You are correct; the images have motion blur. You are shooting at too slow of a shutter speed. What is the ISO you are shooting at? Try increasing the ISO of the camera and thereby increasing the shutter speed.

        k

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        • #5
          ISO is at 100. The shutter speed is S 20 Lo

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          • #6
            Camera data is all in the image
            Date= 18/03/2005
            ISO= 100
            Exposure prog = Manual
            Fstop = f/4.5
            Light source = Tungsten (incandescent light)
            Focal length = 62.0mm
            Aperture value = f/4.4

            Up the ISO and that should solve your motion blur problem out

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            • #7
              ... AND up the shutterspeed. It was 1/20 sec.

              OOps, just saw the shutterspeed was already posted, sorry.
              Last edited by pellepiano; 08-11-2006, 09:50 AM. Reason: Im obviously blind =)

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              • #8
                It looks to me as though these images are, aside from the motion blur, out of focus. It's likely a depth-of-field problem - you're shooting at a pretty wide aperture. I don't think, I'm sorry to say, that there's any solution to your problem given your current setup and the nature of your subjects.

                You just aren't going to accomplish what you want to do with hot lights (unless you increase your total wattage by a factor of about 8). The answer is studio flash.

                dc

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                • #9
                  Blur

                  DC, I have to disagree with your comment. The exposure was 1/20 sec @ ISO 100. That camera, if set to auto-adjust ISO, will increase ISO setting to 1600 (and can be pushed to 3200). That means the reducing the exposure time to 1/320th of a sec which should be quite adequate unless the subject is moving quickly.

                  As for the focus, there is more than ample light for correct functioning of the camaera's autofocus system. These cameras actually have at least 5 targeting sensors which are cycled thru via a navigator button on the rear of the camera. People forget to lock it in one position (usually the center) so while they are pointing the center target at the subject, the camera may be focusing at some other completely different part of the background which results in an out of focus shot.

                  Regards, Murray
                  Last edited by mistermonday; 08-12-2006, 12:49 PM.

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                  • #10
                    mistermonday has it right. i used to shoot motion shots at 400 and 800 iso with a 1/500th or 1/1000th shutterspeed, and that was film. that's really all you need to do. in fact, if you increase the shutter speed, even an iso 100 is sometimes enough. but yes, that would depend on the light available. the more light available the faster you can make the shutter speed and effectively stop motion in its tracks. the iso just makes it so that the sensors capture more light, quicker. so, adjusting the iso and the shutter speed shld solve the problem.

                    on film cameras, particularly before iso was the standard, you had something called 'film speed'. the highter the film speed, the more sensitive to light the film was. thus, you could capture 'stop motion' much easier with less light and a lower shutter speed. the risk was a more grainy image. sports photographers used high speed film a lot. if you've ever seen photos of a moving race car there are two types, the type where the car is just a blur going by and one where the car is in perfect focus even though it's moving 200 mph. the way they got the car going 200 mph to look perfectly in focus, with no blur, was a very high shutter speed and a very fast film speed. my old Canon F1 had a shutter speed going up to 1/2000th of a second and had an asa (what is now iso) setting going up pretty high (i forget the exact high end now. it's been years).

                    i'd also suggest taking it out of auto mode and doing it manually and then bracketing the settings on several shots of the same person/subject.

                    frankly, there is a bit of a danger in some of these new digital cameras in that they really dont teach good photography with all these auto settings. one shld learn how to do depth of field and focusing and camera steadying and filtering and iso's and shutter speeds and f-stops and so on down the line. it's sort of like comparable to plugins vs good painting techniques in photoshop. filter plugins are great but there is still no good substitute for good old hand work and knowing how to use a brush. the same is true with the basics of cameras.

                    craig

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