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How do I make this image bigger without losing quality?

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  • How do I make this image bigger without losing quality?

    I would like to ask a question. How do I make this image bigger but at the same time not lose the quality? I just found this at google and its background is good for the mastermind game that we plan to make, because if I resize it, it just blurs. Also how do i change the background here? I'm hoping to make it big as 640*480 pixels. help thanks! I tried saving in gif the circle only without the white border but there's really nothing happen!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    As far as I know, there is no way to increase the size of an image without "losing" quality. I put "losing" quality in quotes, because in reality, you are not losing any information in the image. The information you need to make it a larger, quality image just doesn't exist - and it can't be created from thin air. Resizing the image to be larger in Photoshop (or any other program which is dedicated to enlarging images) can only be done through interpolation, i.e. the "new" information is calculated from surrounding pixels. When there's not much information to begin with, it's not possible to enlarge to a quality image.

    Hope this helps,
    Jeanie

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    • #3
      Also how do i change the background at the image?

      Pls. help I have a picture here. I would like to resize it to 40*40 pixels but my problem is that if I resize it within that size the thum look like its flatten. When you flat an image what does it mean? Did you see the black outline. how do I get it out and there is still a black color behind the image bec.I just kinda rotate the image and trim it so the thumb would look like its standing. How do I do clear it bec. del or magic eraser don't work?
      Does doing a transform scale make the trick to make a small image become big and look good?
      Why is it sometimes when I move the image there appears some dotted bakcground from where that image is?
      How do I interpolate an image?

      Comment


      • #4
        Unfortunately enlarging a small image always
        "pixelates". Pixelation is when the picture
        appears "chunky". It is caused when one
        zooms in very very close or if one enlarges
        a smaller image too big. The reason it happens
        is because of the nature of "digital". A digital
        image is stored as pixels, small dots of color
        on your screen. The bigger the original image
        the smaller these dots are. What you see on
        the screen is Photoshop's display of that image.
        It may or may not be showing the smallest
        dot or pixel possible at any given zoom setting.
        Remember that your monitor always has the
        same pixel resolution, the resolution you set
        on your desktop(PC) (don't know aboutMacs).
        Mine is set to 1024X768, yours might be different.
        Photoshop knows that setting and adjusts
        its output to the monitor accordingly. But the
        file image size is fixed also. If, for instance, the filesize was also 1024X768 then the my monitor
        would display 1024 pixels across the screen
        exactly and I would see the exact whole image
        on my monitor. However, if in PS, I zoom in
        2:1, my monitor still displays 1024 across but now I only have 512 pixels to display the image
        segment. PS then has to "double" or interpolate
        each pixel so that the monitor looks correct. If
        you looked at the image on the monitor with a
        magnifing glass you would see two identical
        pixels side by side for each one you saw in
        the 1:1 image. As PS zooms in closer it duplicates pixels appropiately to give as nice
        an image as possible. If I zoom in far enough
        the image on my monitor starts to become
        "chunky" or made up of blocks. Each block
        is a set of duplicated pixels(many identical).
        If I display a small image, say 40X40, at 1:1
        it will be pretty small on my monitor. If I begin
        to zoom in on it, PS starts duplicating pixels
        and creating those "chunks" and pretty quickly
        I start seeing them. This is why you loose
        resolution when you blow up a small image.

        Woody

        Comment


        • #5
          Also how do i change the background at the image?

          There are a couple different ways. The easiest would be to select the background and then paste a new background into the selection. Or, you can select the part of the image you want and then copy it to a new background.

          Pls. help I have a picture here. I would like to resize it to 40*40 pixels but my problem is that if I resize it within that size the thum look like its flatten. When you flat an image what does it mean?

          Flattening an image means that you combine all of the layers in an image into one.

          Did you see the black outline. how do I get it out and there is still a black color behind the image bec.I just kinda rotate the image and trim it so the thumb would look like its standing. How do I do clear it bec. del or magic eraser don't work?

          I'm not sure what you mean by a black outline, but if your background color is set to black and you rotate your image, then the area that fills up the "rectangle" will be the same color as your background color. If you don't want black, then change your background color to whatever color you want before you rotate. Or, crop the image after you rotate so that you don't see the background color. (You will lose the outer edges of some of your original image this way though.)

          Does doing a transform scale make the trick to make a small image become big and look good?

          It doesn't matter what you use to make a small image big - if the data isn't there to begin with, it won't look good.

          Why is it sometimes when I move the image there appears some dotted bakcground from where that image is?

          Is it a dotted background or a small checkerboard? I think it is probably the "transparent" background informing you that the area of your image that you see with the checkerboard is transparent.

          How do I interpolate an image?

          Whenever you resize the actual pixel dimensions of an image, PS interpolates the data.

          Jeanie

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

            Hello Everyone, you have a couple of different ways that you can Enlarge a small image. 1st way is to Scan it in with a High Res Scanner to enlarge the original image. I have taken several old family photos 1.25 x 2 inches and enlarged them to 8 x 10 inches without any loss of quality. 2nd Method if you do not have a Scanner setup you small image with plenty of light around it without any light flares on the image and take a picture with your Digital Camera making sure there is no shadows. Same results only you really need a tripod for this method.
            I hope this helps some of you with enlargements.
            Best Regards

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            • #7
              Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

              moving this to the right forum...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                Sadly there's no magical way for this. You have a certain ammount of pixels, and when you enlarge an image you only enlarge the pixels that are in the image already.

                The pixels will get bigger, but there will be no extra pixels added to make the image look smooth. It is not possible to make an image high resolution (big with lots of pixels) from a low resolution (small not so many pixels).

                For a background like this, I wouldn't use an image at all, but a pattern. That way you have to load fewer things if you end up using it in a game.
                Last edited by DJSoulglo; 11-24-2008, 07:11 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                  I've found that you can often enlarge an image, at least for web-quality, not print, by importing the image into photoshop, converting the layers to 'smart objects' and then enlarging to 2-3 times what you want the photo to be. Then rasterize the layers, again convert to smart objects, and resize down to the desired size. While this obviously doesn't produce perfect results, often times it is acceptable quality for web images.

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                  • #10
                    Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                    image>>> image size>>> select size>>> Bicubic sharpener>>> select OK

                    Sharpen the picture, I used my own brand.

                    thats how i got to what is below. There isnt much more you can do with such a small thumbnail.

                    Hope this helps,
                    -Keven
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                      The best resizer I have seen is OnOneSoftware - Genuine Fractals. It describes the image with a fractal, then re-creates it at any resolution you need. One can get a 500% increase while maintaining quality.

                      http://www.ononesoftware.com/detail.php?prodLine_id=2

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                        From what I can see of the image, you could probably re-create the image at the size you want in Photoshop.

                        Or search again in Google, Yahoo, Live for images that are medium size or large size.
                        Last edited by smak; 11-25-2008, 09:11 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                          Andrew Rodney and I did a 2 1/2 hour show on just this subject, with exhaustive examination of every possible method. You can watch Andrew's full-sized desktop as he runs through many different methods and examples, comparing and contrasting each. There are also downloadable notes (link given at the end of the show). It's entitled "Resolution". You can rent it here.
                          Learn by teaching
                          Take responsibility for learning

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                          • #14
                            Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                            Why not do it in Illustrator or photoshop so you can have a crisp image. Just copy the style of the original image you're copying.

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                            • #15
                              Re: How do I make this image bigger without losing

                              Here it is! Magic.
                              Actually no, I just did a reverse image search on google and found the image.
                              Attached Files

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