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Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

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  • Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

    Hello Everyone,
    I know this isn't related to photography but perhaps someone can help anyway! I've had an artist draw up a new logo for me with some very fine details, then scan and send it to me. The thing is the "texture" of the lines that make up the illustration are not solid, as in some lines are perfectly black, others look like they have millions of little white dots on them. When the logo is displayed somewhere and is quite small this is not a problem but whenever I want it printed bigger it looks odd because there are parts that are perfectly black and others that have these tiny white dots and make the lines look lighter in some places... Is there any way I can fix this without manually drawing over the logo as it is a very very complex image? No need to worry about greys or shading it's all supposed to be black. Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

    Okay, I figured something out, Posterize > Gaussian Blur > Unsharp Mask. Is that the way?

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    • #3
      Re: Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

      I would start with a level adjustments.

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      • #4
        Re: Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

        You should live trace in Adobe Illustrator, once you find the right settings for your logo you will have a perfect vector file with no need for tracing. With vectors you can use on on larger print formats without sacrificing quality, hope this helps.

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        • #5
          Re: Turning a paper drawing into a vector logo

          A logo should always be vector art (ie Illustrator - .ai, .eps, etc. file formats). Bitmap images cannot be scaled or changed without some degradation of quality.

          Live Trace works sometimes but can create a mess of points, and, in my experience, doesn't work all that well for anything complex.


          I would suggest that you reconsider what you are using. Also, for printing, vector artwork will have more flexibility and print "crisper" (think fonts, which are vectors).

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