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  • Exotic Print Media

    Any body out there doing any printing on felt, watercolor or other type of "exotic" medium? What ya usin'? How are the results? Any special set up required and by using the special types do you feel it adds to your ability to seperate dollars from wallets? (Other than YOUR DOLLARS from YOUR WALLET)!!! Tom

  • #2
    How about printing on film type, I guess its called transparency or transparent media---anyone done that? Tom

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    • #3
      Jeez Tom. You finally posted a question I can't even take a crack at!

      Ed

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      • #4
        Does the T-shirt transfer paper count? I tried that once. It was ok but you had to be careful how long you ironed and make sure it was totally cold before peeling the backing paper off the T-shirt.
        I think I would get better results if I brought my design/photo to a silk screener though.
        DJ

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        • #5
          AH - HA a tug on the thread!!! The bait is taken!!! Come on Dj, tell us the particulars---any special considerations when printing? Resolution? Color settings? Does that medium feed OK through the printer or are Jams a problem? Advice for our fine readers out there? Tom

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          • #6
            This is slightly off topic, but would the T-shirt thing be worth considering, making them with your ad on it? What about cost consideratiions? We had T-shirts made, and it seemed like everybody in town was wearing them. We had a small logo and text on the front pocket, and a large logo and text on the back. They make pretty good advertising.

            Ed

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            • #7
              I once exchanged emails (I may have posted it here somewhere) with someone that refilled new, factory clean printer cartridges with icing, and printed on cookies.
              Learn by teaching
              Take responsibility for learning

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              • #8
                Well -- yeah! But don't you need a left handed printer for that?

                Ed

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                • #9
                  Doug,
                  That's a new one on me but very interesting. I am trying to imagine how that would work. How do you put the cookie through the printer?

                  Tom-
                  Here's the scoop on the t-shirt transfer. It's the same stuff as those iron on decals you can buy except you print on the paper yourself. They turn out kind of shiny and a thin rubbery layer on your t-shirt. It's ok but for a professional look I would go more for the silk screening. The thing to remember if you have never tried this before (especially if you have wording on it) INVERT the printing process. Sometimes printer settings have t-shirt transfer in their selection menu and do it automatically. Mine didn't so the first time I printed it I got an inside out print. Had to read it in a mirror. Not good. I have the Epson 2000 now and I don't think there's any t-shirt paper for that one. YET
                  DJ

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                  • #10
                    This was from a similar thread in another list I used to run. It's about a couple of different exotic printing techniques. I've no idea who 'Joe' is, but I don't think he'd mind:

                    Disclaimer: as far as I know the Epson printers were not built with any intention of printing on anything edible or with any form of edible ink. I make no warranties of any kind regarding poisioning or other health hazards of using the machines in this manner.

                    The adhesive project was an attempt to get the printer to make enamel decals to fire onto glass and ceramics. I'd print the dilute adhesive (1 part elmers, 3 parts gum arabic, 30 parts water). Then psray the paper lightly with water, dust on the powdered enamel, let dry, and shake off the excess. Then glaze the paper, enamel side down, to the object (spray-A for glass, overglaze for ceramics) and low fire.

                    Also tried using the inkjet to print the chemicals that color glazes and glass directly. Only problem is that they react with eachother when fired, so my copper sulfate cyan and my chromium chloride yellow turned black.

                    Remember, these chemicals are very toxic, much more so than any normal ink. Also remember that glass dust (and enamels) are hazardous dust, wear a proper respirator.

                    As far as edibles, the sugar solution was an attempt to do powdered sugar or granulated sugar artwork. Print the artwork in sugar solution, get the paper damp, dust with powdered sugar or granulated sugar, get the candy damp or warm, thanasfer the sugar design to the candy.

                    Also found the epsons do quite well printing in food coloring.

                    When using anything sticky, remember to flush the printer immediatly with windex after a run. When printing edibles, use an alcohol flush before and after printing. Dedicate a printer to edibles. It can be a real low end machine, you will not get 1440dpi in powdered sugar.

                    Disclaimer: as far as I know the Epson printers were not built with any intention of printing on anything edible or with any form of edible ink. I make no warranties of any kind regarding poisioning or other health hazards of using the machines in this manner.

                    Ciao!

                    Joe
                    Learn by teaching
                    Take responsibility for learning

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                    • #11
                      Gees Louise.... Who thinks up this stuff? In my wildest dreams I would never have considered a powdered sugar print out. Well, I am 44 today and I can finally say I've heard it all!!!
                      DJ

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                      • #12
                        OK,uh...., Is this sort of like using an electric drill with a piece of metal coathanger gripped in the chuck to unplug the toilet? 'Cause I saw that tried and it ISNOT pretty. Tom

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                        • #13
                          Tom,
                          Everytime I read you posts I end up laughing histerically. My father was a plumber and that would have been sacriligeous to him not to mention a mess to clean. Humans are a resourceful lot hey? I guess things like this are the forefathers to the next invention. Incidently, I can show you how to turn a power drill into a circular saw by trying to cut a 1 inch hole in a circular sheet of metal while holding on it. Almost lost some fingers doing that. So I can identify with the toilet rooter idea.

                          Who knows Epson may read Dougs post and think of a whole new line of business catering to the local bakeries.
                          Dj
                          Last edited by DJ Dubovsky; 08-23-2001, 03:29 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Dj, Actually some of the "ideas" folks come up with really seem more like sincere attempts at removing themselves from the collective gene pool than anything else. Sometimes, as an old saying from Japan goes , "One must be open to the Ahhh..... of things." Tom

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                            • #15
                              Here's another hair puller---- Anyone know how to print negatives? Seriously. Really!! Tom

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