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  • Blues appearing magenta

    Hey guys! I've been calibrating my monitor for the last year and a half with a X-Rite i1Display Pro. Usually, I achieve a pretty good ∆E of 0.61 on average. I use two monitors; one is an older EIZO ColorEdge CE240W. The other one is a cheaper ASUS –*don't have the model.

    I noticed that both monitors have a problem with perceiving subtle blues as magenta.

    For instance, I'm a photographer as well, and I use Capture One Pro 9 for most of my pre-edit stuff. When using their color wheel, when I bring the shadows into the blue area, the shadows tend to appear more magenta than purple.

    My usual settings are:
    120cd/m^2
    native contrast
    d65 white point.

    I usually keep my light on while calibrating. I've tried calibrating with the light both on and off with no result.

    The problem is duplicated across both displays.

    Any ideas?

  • #2
    Re: Blues appearing magenta

    How many hours does the 240W have on it? If it's something insane, it might just be wearing out. 0.61 means its perfect according to the device for that particular measurement. It's not that meaningful on its own.

    I don't know what you mean by more magenta than purple. At a high level, you get magenta by reducing green. The ratio of blue to red with constant green will impact this.

    This sounds typical for an incorrect monitor profile assigned.

    Perhaps your eyes are off. This seems less likely. I mentioned this in the other thread, but 120cd/m^2 can feel pretty hard on your eyes. This might be the cause of your eye fatigue. Recommendations are all over the place for different reasons, but you can generally go much lower without your whites being darker than a printed image could appear when viewed under a desktop print viewer.

    Last thing. You're not editing images in LAB are you? That blue to purple shift is typical there, although it seems highly unlikely. Whatever you do, make sure to check this with the lights off. That way you aren't influenced by ambient lighting.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Blues appearing magenta

      Yep, I notice the same thing on the Eizos, they are just a tad magenta. But once I start working, this impression goes away. I think this is because of the environment, and perceived gray(open window, green trees outside, and strong sun). Look at the monitors in a dark room, or on a rainy day, they might look yellowish on a rainy day.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Blues appearing magenta

        Originally posted by klev View Post
        How many hours does the 240W have on it? If it's something insane, it might just be wearing out. 0.61 means its perfect according to the device for that particular measurement. It's not that meaningful on its own.

        I don't know what you mean by more magenta than purple. At a high level, you get magenta by reducing green. The ratio of blue to red with constant green will impact this.

        This sounds typical for an incorrect monitor profile assigned.

        Perhaps your eyes are off. This seems less likely. I mentioned this in the other thread, but 120cd/m^2 can feel pretty hard on your eyes. This might be the cause of your eye fatigue. Recommendations are all over the place for different reasons, but you can generally go much lower without your whites being darker than a printed image could appear when viewed under a desktop print viewer.

        Last thing. You're not editing images in LAB are you? That blue to purple shift is typical there, although it seems highly unlikely. Whatever you do, make sure to check this with the lights off. That way you aren't influenced by ambient lighting.
        The monitor has 11,253 hours on it. Not really sure if that's a lot, but alas.

        When I said "more magenta than purple", I probably meant "more magenta than blue." It's late, I'm tired. My bad! Haha.

        I avoid LAB. I've never seen the point of working with it to be honest. I'm sure it has its advantages, I've just never caught onto it. That said, I stick with RGB.

        Here's something interesting. Half a year ago, this wasn't a problem. I didn't have trouble with blues being more magenta in color. So it's either a change of environment, or my eyes are failing me.

        Skoobey, as for it being the monitor, I'm not so sure. It seems to occur across both monitors I have. I will say that the blues tend to be more of an aqua color, versus on my other monitor, the blues being more of a "normal" blue.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Blues appearing magenta

          It could be an issue of display profiles. If the wrong one is assigned via your CMM, it would cause this. If you're on a mac and have colorLCD (system default) selected due to some bug, this could cause the problem. Oh and it should still be okay at 11,000 hours. That's high, but not so high that you need to retire it. It depends on the display though.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Blues appearing magenta

            If both displays have the same issue, then it could be the way you are calibrating, the environment, or your eyes.

            Eizo's are not perfect - no monitor is perfect, but some are better. You might want to fiddle with your calibration settings - use native color gamut if that setting is available.

            See the screen shot attached for the settings I use on my NEC. 12,480 hours and still very good consistency and within target. I went from a contrast of 400/1 to 200/1 to help emulate printed results with just a slight shift in the mid's but still within target.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Blues appearing magenta

              Originally posted by Shoku View Post
              If both displays have the same issue, then it could be the way you are calibrating, the environment, or your eyes.

              Eizo's are not perfect - no monitor is perfect, but some are better. You might want to fiddle with your calibration settings - use native color gamut if that setting is available.

              See the screen shot attached for the settings I use on my NEC. 12,480 hours and still very good consistency and within target. I went from a contrast of 400/1 to 200/1 to help emulate printed results with just a slight shift in the mid's but still within target.
              Could it be something wrong with the way that I perceive blue is created?

              Maybe it is my eyes, or maybe it's a lack of understanding of how blue is created on my part. If I take the color balance tool, and shift shadows toward blue, often time they end up more magenta. Then, to balance that, I'll add a bit of cyan. Is that right? Or should blue be blue?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Blues appearing magenta

                You nailed it. Color balance is a relevant adjustment, so if something is already cold, yes, it will look more magenta, because in RGB, it's the red+blue that make magenta. And what we perceive as "blue" is not always a 100% blue, but it has green in it as well, and that is normal. It's how monitors and RGB color space work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Blues appearing magenta

                  Originally posted by quadwing View Post
                  If I take the color balance tool, and shift shadows toward blue, often time they end up more magenta. Then, to balance that, I'll add a bit of cyan. Is that right? Or should blue be blue?
                  It's the tool. To make the shadow blue you will need to add cyan.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Blues appearing magenta

                    Originally posted by Shoku View Post
                    If both displays have the same issue, then it could be the way you are calibrating, the environment, or your eyes.

                    Eizo's are not perfect - no monitor is perfect, but some are better. You might want to fiddle with your calibration settings - use native color gamut if that setting is available.

                    See the screen shot attached for the settings I use on my NEC. 12,480 hours and still very good consistency and within target. I went from a contrast of 400/1 to 200/1 to help emulate printed results with just a slight shift in the mid's but still within target.

                    Sure. I didn't want to suggest that they're perfect. If he's on a mac and for some strange reason the cmm went back to the default profile named "color lcd", that might do it. That's a separate issue from target gamut, as targets are separate from characteristics in ICC's profile specification.

                    Comment

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