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WYSIWYG! What You See Is What You Get

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  • WYSIWYG! What You See Is What You Get

    Hello!

    All I'm asking from the universe is to have my color prints look like what I see on my monitor. I've been around the block a little with Photoshop, scanning, restoration, and yet this color calibration stuff makes my head spin! ColorSync, Color Management, printer profiles, ICC profiles, Relative Colormetric? I do the necessary reading to help myself learn, but I can't seem to get my arms around "color" even after reading about it?! I know this isn't about rotisserie chicken, but isn't there a common sense method to set it and forget it?

    My Tools:

    Apple G4
    Apple 17" Studio Display
    Microtek 4900 Scanner
    Canon S9000 Printer
    Photoshop CS
    Indesign CS
    Quark 6

    THANK YOU in advance for your support!

    Scott

  • #2
    we sell a product at work here called Monaco EZ Color Optix. I've not tried it out myself but my co workers have been very happy with it.
    Try looking it up on line and see if it might suit your needs


    Juliana

    Comment


    • #3
      Scotty, take comfort in the knowledge that you're not alone and sometimes despite your best efforts, nothing will work.

      I had two computers. The iMac was connected to the printers, so I used it to print images from photoshop and thought I was getting decent prints - I had followed all the advice.

      Then one day, I happened to be working on some images on my iBook and rather than transfer them to the iMac, I decided to hook up the printer to the iBook and print from there. I had printed other images in the same series from the iMac and the difference was astonishing.

      In fairness to Apple, the iMac I was using was never intended for graphic work (it's about 2 years old in people years) and I've since "loaned" it to my Mom who loves it for games and email.

      I've never done any calibration to the iBook, and it continues to put out really nice images.

      IMHO, color matching is like herding cats

      Take care, Margaret

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ScottyLProd
        Hello!

        All I'm asking from the universe is to have my color prints look like what I see on my monitor. I've been around the block a little with Photoshop, scanning, restoration, and yet this color calibration stuff makes my head spin! ColorSync, Color Management, printer profiles, ICC profiles, Relative Colormetric? I do the necessary reading to help myself learn, but I can't seem to get my arms around "color" even after reading about it?! I know this isn't about rotisserie chicken, but isn't there a common sense method to set it and forget it?

        My Tools:

        Apple G4
        Apple 17" Studio Display
        Microtek 4900 Scanner
        Canon S9000 Printer
        Photoshop CS
        Indesign CS
        Quark 6

        THANK YOU in advance for your support!

        Scott
        Hi Scott

        Two things I would say right off is that your prints will never ever look like your monitor. They can't because your monitor is a light source. But you should be able to get pretty close. Second, you can't set it and forget it. Recalibration should take place at least once a month.
        Having said that, do you feel you have your monitor calibrated correctly? You may want to try EasyRGB.com. I found it easier to calibrate my PC. Of course the best method would be to invest in a densitometer or colorimeter.

        Is your printer set to the same profile as your monitor? I always use Adobe RGB (1998). If you are using Apple your gamma should be set to 1.8.

        Are your prints lighter or darker than the monitor? This can make the colors look off. You can compensate by changing your gamma point from 1.8 to something less or more.

        If you know all this, give us some more specific details as you perceive them.

        Cheers
        Duv

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Scott

          Here's a simple method that might solve your problem. Go to your Control Panel or whatever the Apple version is. Click on Printers then Preferences. There should be a number of tabs one of them being General. Click on this. Then click on Printing Preferences. Click on Main. There should be an area called Color Adjustment. Click on Set, then click on Enable ICM.

          Most modern printers do a darn good job matching the monitor in this setting, regardless of what profile you use.

          Let me know how this works or if you have any questions.

          Duv

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