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  • tips /pointers on restoration

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/grumpy4...7623677193912/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/grumpy4...7623677193912/
    I hope this works,any tips on how I could make this better. I did not like the way the collar came out.
    Mike

  • #2
    Re: tips /pointers on restoration

    Mike, the gentleman's face has been blurred to the extent that I am not sure if I prefer the before image. A pixel level dodge and burn along with minimal clonining can give you a much cleaner, sharper and more pleasing result. The down side it that you may need a couple of hours worth of work on it.
    Regards, Murray

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: tips /pointers on restoration

      Thanks Murray, this is my first real attempt at restoring a photo. I am trying the d and b but it allways looks flat to me.

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      • #4
        Re: tips /pointers on restoration

        At what point doe's restoration go beyond just plain clarity . In this photo the mess was all but eliminated and a pretty nice photo was left

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        • #5
          Re: tips /pointers on restoration

          djm,

          that pretty much has to be decided by the artist and the client. i know for myself, i look at something and go 'yup, that's good enough.' That usually happens when, if i imagine being the client, and i'd be happy with the improvement. for others it may be different. basically, you are creating an effect. the person you are creating this effect on is your client (or if not professionally, then maybe a friend or family) and if they are happy, you see that smile on their face or they go 'wow!' or something along those lines, then ya done good some folks think they have to do perfection. that's pretty much the wrong thing to shoot for. shoot for a good improvement, a good effect on the client, a good communication, something close to the original (if possible) or something that anyone, if they picked your work up, would go, "nice job!".

          you have to be a bit flexible with the results. some photos are so badly damaged as to be nearly un-helpable. you do what you can or refuse the job as too difficult. some jobs are fairly easy. some folks like to not just restore but to also enhance, like in removing blemishes or wrinkles are to colorize black and whites. if the client is happy, you've done your job.

          but, beware the trouble client. some folks wont be happy if you went back in time and retook the picture yourself. those, you just shut the door on and never do work for again. they'll eat you up in being overly critical, slow to pay if they pay at all and will give you bad references no matter how good the job was. tough one to learn, but ya have to know those folks exist.

          most folks are decent and will pay for good work done. it's the 'done' you have to decide when it's there or not. sometimes you just ask the client; 'how's this?' and if you get your 'wow!', then it's done. if you see a frown or a puzzled look, start asking questions and get them to describe what they REALLY need and want. folks dont always know what it is they want, or, if they know, they dont always know how to express it. some will tell you 'just fix it' and when you do and show them, you may find out that your idea of 'just fix it' and their idea of the same, is not the same at all.

          the best time to ask questions is before you start. pin them down as best you can. show them examples. explain the difference between restoration and restoration with enhancements. explain honestly up front if you think you cant do a decent restore on a badly damaged image. better to not take on the job at all than to spend hours on a job only to have the client frown. so, let them know what they can expect. showing them a portfolio can help. they'll have some idea of what to expect of you and your work.

          this can be a tricky field. photos vary, clients vary. and as you'll see in this forum from person to person, results vary. basically, you have to set the level of quality and then maintain that integrity. you can set it high, set it low or however you want, but it's like anything else that is sold, the client is the one you have to sell to, so some are tough, some are easy and some will lie, cheat and steal and chew you up in the process.

          it's a good question you pose; how good is good enough? the answer is, good enough to make a living on it and good enough that you can feel good about it

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          • #6
            Re: tips /pointers on restoration

            My first impression is that the shirt and teeth are way too light. You've lost all detail in both. A key to restoration is to keep detail, but lose damage. The challenge comes when those things overlap. I would rework the image trying to preserve the luminosity value in both.

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            • #7
              Re: tips /pointers on restoration

              I did a screen capture and did a quick restore on your photo. Take look at the red channel, it's not in bad shape. Use it as a starting point for the restoration. It took me about 15 min. and I think most customers would be happy with it.

              As mentioned already, bumping up the contrast not only destroys detail, but it detracts from the original photo. The other destroyer of detail is noise reduction, it's all too easy to over do it and often creates a blotches. IMO, there's nothing wrong with a little grain in a photo, and after it is printed you'll won't even notice the remaining grain.

              If you'd like to give permission, I'll post my example. Will wait for your reply.

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              • #8
                Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                please do, and thanks. I am not happy with the photo, and plan on fixing or completely retring it.

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                • #9
                  Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                  Originally posted by silverdae View Post
                  My first impression is that the shirt and teeth are way too light. You've lost all detail in both. A key to restoration is to keep detail, but lose damage. The challenge comes when those things overlap. I would rework the image trying to preserve the luminosity value in both.
                  I agree with you . Idid not like the way the collar came out. I will try to add some texture to it and tone down the teeth.
                  Thank you

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                    I'm sure you can get a better result with a high resolution scan, but here's what I could do with a screen capture.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                      WOW that came out great.I need a lot more practice

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                      • #12
                        Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                        Hi Michael

                        I used for 95% of the pic the Clone Tool then used a filter called Topaz Denoise 3, for the first then used another filter called Nik Software Silver Efex Pro for the second... the last is with a little noise added to be more faithfull to the original.

                        It is a shame that we are limited to only uploading small files?

                        Lee
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by seaco; 04-21-2010, 03:43 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: tips /pointers on restoration

                          great job. I need a lot more practice.
                          thanks Mike

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