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  • Settings for Scanning

    What dpi should I use to scan in old photos? And which file format should I save them in using PS3?

    Using an Epson Perfection 1240U.

  • #2
    Re: Settings for Scanning

    Choose your scan resolution so as to generate 300ppi at the ultimate OUTPUT size. So for example if the largest size that you ever intend to print will be 8 x 12 inches, you would ideally need 2400 x 3600 pixels. If the photo that you are scanning is 4 x 6 inches, then you will need a scan resolution of 600ppi or greater. If your output will be 12 x 18" from a 4x6 photo, you need 3600 x 5400 or 900ppi. Since 900 ppi is not a standard scan res, you would need to go to 1200ppi.
    Save the scan output to a file format that uses lossless compression - like TIFF or PSD but preferably not jpeg or if jpeg use the highest quality setting. TIFF is probably preferable because it has a Lossless compression setting and you can set PS to open them automatically in Adobe Camera RAW.
    Regards, Murray

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    • #3
      Re: Settings for Scanning

      Thank you very much Murray, most helpful.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Settings for Scanning

        Good info Murray. I have been meaning to ask that same question.

        Dak

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        • #5
          Re: Settings for Scanning

          Murray, another question please. Should I scan as a Gray Scale image or Color? Reason I ask is that I am following a tutorial on levels, the tutorial is showing RGB Channels on a B&W image but I only get Gray Scale Channel?

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          • #6
            Re: Settings for Scanning

            Definitely scan in color, even if the photo is in B&W. For example if you have some yellowing discoloration or stains or colored mold spots, they can be filtered out much more easily. Certain reflections or textures in the paper will be recorded differently by the R,G,B channels resulting in contrast that can be more easily isolated when post processing the image.
            One other thing that is important when scanning. Turn OFF all of the automatic settings that the scanner s/w want to apply to "help" you. Turn OFF:
            - DeScreen
            - Auto Levels
            - Auto Contrast
            - Auto Color
            - Auto Brightness
            - All Sharpening
            - All pretty much anything
            The scanner s/w will almost always do more damage to a scan than it will do good. Wrong guesses produce damage & loss which is difficult or impossible to recover from. You would be much better to take a raw unmodified scan and then open & process it in Camera RAW or PS or both.
            Regards, Murray
            Last edited by mistermonday; 09-24-2010, 12:46 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: Settings for Scanning

              Thats great info thank you. However, you now have me wondering if my scanner is good enough, it seems the only thing I can overide is the DPI?

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              • #8
                Re: Settings for Scanning

                Good info, Murray

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                • #9
                  Re: Settings for Scanning

                  Maverick, you can control all that stuff on your 1240U. You need to switch from auto to manual mode. Please check your user manual or dowoad one from Epson.
                  Regards, Murray

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                  • #10
                    Re: Settings for Scanning

                    Thank you once again.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Settings for Scanning

                      I found this link on another forum.
                      http://photodoctor911.com/scantips.html

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                      • #12
                        Re: Settings for Scanning

                        Originally posted by unimatrix001 View Post
                        I found this link on another forum.
                        http://photodoctor911.com/scantips.html
                        Thats really useful thank you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Settings for Scanning

                          I generally suggest the following formula for calculating a suitable scan resolution. Of course, you should always take into consideration the output size.

                          scan resolution = (desired width / actual width) * desired resolution
                          If the original image is 2.5" wide and a 6" print @ 300 ppi is required
                          scan resolution = (6 / 2.5) * 300 = 720ppi.

                          I scan all images in RGB, regardless of whether they are black and white, sepia or colour. Information potentially useful for restoring monochrome images can be extracted from the individual RGB (red, green and blue) colour channels.

                          I also avoid using any auto correction functions on my scanner. I would much prefer to make corrections in Photoshop where I have full control. I do use the descreen function on occasion however. HTH

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                          • #14
                            Re: Settings for Scanning

                            Thanks Carol

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                            • #15
                              Re: Settings for Scanning

                              Thanks for posting this question its one that I have been struggling with. Thanks for the advice on sizing (MisterMonday and for the calculators Unimatrix001 and Carol). I have scanned photos at 300, 600, 1200, 2000 dpi - the higher resolutions only because of needing to enlarge a really small old photo. Where the photo is of good quality this has been useful if I have been looking to resize it. However one problem I have discovered is this introduces unwanted textures or enlarges those age defects - so I would be interested to know what people do... particularly where your printer outputs higher than 300dpi. Is it better to scan at the printer resolution or scan at a lower resolution and let the printer resample to size (I have an Epsom that prints at 1440 dpi ). Or is it better to scan at the lower resolution and resize in photoshop?

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