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Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

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  • Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

    I am finally ready to start on a photo restoration/digitization project for all my old family photos (some as old as 100 years). I was planning on doing this several years ago and got some tools for it, but I just never got around to it. I did upgrade from Photoshop CS4 to Photoshop CC, but my concern is that some of the techniques and learning tools that I have may be outdated. Here are the programs/hardware that I have:
    • Photoshop CC
    • Lightroom 5
    • Epson Perfection V700 Photo Scanner
    • **still need to buy multiple storage media**

    I have found several Youtube videos on the subject such as from Eric Basir plus I have 2 main books to help me: Digitizing Your Family History (Rhonda R. McClure) and Digital Restoration From Start to Finish (Ctein). Digital Restoration From Start to Finish will probably be my main book, but my biggest concern is that it was published in 2007. This book has a 2nd edition printed in 2010, and I know that there have been some advancements in retouching. For example, I've heard on a couple photography shows that levels and curves are now considered "old school" and are being replaced by ACR sliders, but I wasn't sure if they were just referring to processing modern digital files from cameras. Content Aware also seems like a powerful tool that wasn't around before.

    Do you think I have the most up-to-date tools now, or are there now better learning tools (books/videos) with more modern, better techniques? I just found this forum, so I'm pretty sure I'll be using it as a resource. I know I may be over thinking this, but this will be a pretty big undertaking, so I want to get this right the first time.

  • #2
    Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

    I do think that you may be over thinking or at least worrying too much about having the latest and greatest tools.

    I am sure that there are many people still using much older versions of Photoshop to accomplish restorations and image retouching. Techniques have not changed to accomplish basic tasks of colour/luminosity correction and while some of the newer tools such as content aware can be useful there are usually other tried and tested methods to produce the same effects.

    Cteins book is just as relevant now as it was when first published.

    Forget those that make silly statements such as curves are old school that have been replaced by ACR sliders! The fact is that both sliders and point curves are available in both LR and ACR and there are times when you may need to use point curve to fine tune any or all of the RGB values particularly when working with photo restoration.

    There is no reason why you cannot process your restoration files via ACR, in fact you may find it advantageous due to non destructive edits, adding clarity etc. But unless you are starting with a good image in the first instance you may find that you have to go into PS at some stage to apply tools that are either not available in ACR or are difficult to work with for fine control

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

      Something to consider: volunteering to perform restoration of photos damaged in storms, fires, tornadoes and other tragic events can be an opportunity to refine and strengthen your restoration skill set.

      In addition to that, other volunteers are typically willing to share their respective techniques, which may apply across various versions of Photoshop, as well as, other graphic editing programs.

      Here's a link or three to get you started: http://www.operationphotorescue.org/
      In their discussion forum:
      General Techniques
      Photoshop specific

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

        An additional resource would be to Google "Care For Sandy". They take volunteers to restore photos for victims of
        Hurricane Sandy from 2012, and yes, there's still lots of work to be done.. Be aware, they do require a sample of your work to assess your skill level, but they have lots of work for beginners.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

          An additional resource would be to Google "Care For Sandy". They take volunteers to restore photos for victims ofHurricane Sandy from 2012, and yes, there's still lots of work to be done.. Be aware, they do require a sample of your work to assess your skill level, but they have lots of work for beginners.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

            Originally posted by Vernon View Post
            Something to consider: volunteering to perform restoration of photos damaged in storms, fires, tornadoes and other tragic events can be an opportunity to refine and strengthen your restoration skill set.

            In addition to that, other volunteers are typically willing to share their respective techniques, which may apply across various versions of Photoshop, as well as, other graphic editing programs.

            Here's a link or three to get you started: http://www.operationphotorescue.org/
            In their discussion forum:
            General Techniques
            Photoshop specific
            Ah I'm going to check those out. I've done some retouching work for non-profit and charity events. In cases of a corporate sponsor I was paid. In other cases I donated my own time if I liked the cause. It wasn't so much restoration though as helping improve their marketing materials for whatever event.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Photo Restoration Project/Techniques

              And here's the other:
              www.careforsandy.org

              Comment

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