Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

removing oily, facial shine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • removing oily, facial shine

    Any suggestions for how to do this? Have adolescent daughter and this shows up a lot. Find that the clone stamp often leaves splotchy results, or I think what I've seen referred to here as a "clone trail." If I fiddle with the opacity, it's better. Not nuts about the healing brush because if you get close to any hair, it picks up that color.

    Using Photoshop CS.

  • #2
    You can try selecting a larger area of skin, copying to a new layer (Ctrl-J), moving over the shine area, adjust levels to get an approximate match in tone, then add a "Hide All" mask and brush in with a soft low-opacity brush over the shiny area. This sometimes works, anyway.

    Comment


    • #3
      It always helps if we can see the image.
      However, try this: Use the clone tool to clean up the areas, especially close to the hair. Then use the healing brush to blend everything (clean up tracks) and bring the original texture back in to that area (staying clear of the hair line).

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi CyndieM,

        Welcome to RP!

        ...here is something else to try for minimizing 'shiny spots':
        • Create a new Empty Layer (Blending > Darken)
        • Pick a Soft Brush (Opacity > 30%)
        • Alt + click on an area very close to the 'Shiny Spot'
        • Carefully paint over the 'Shiny Spot'
        • Add just a bit of noise.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          here's an example

          I'm gonna try uploading an example. If it doesn't upload, please give me a hint on how to do this!!
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            I used the Patch tool to get most of the shine (second picture).
            Then used the copy and move layers technique described in my earlier post to fix the remaining little areas around the hairline and eyes (third picture).
            Finally merged layers and put a copy of the merged image at 80% opacity over the original image. That allows just a very small amount of shine to show through and creates a more natural appearance (first picture).

            [Edited because I couldn't get the pictures to load in the order I wanted, so changed the description of which picture was which instead]
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Your picture uploaded perfectly!!

              ...here is what I managed to do...

              (I also used 'Selective Colors' to correct the skin tone a bit....)


              Leah,

              I love the first one of your pictures....Was that done with the Patch Tool only?
              Attached Files
              Last edited by Flora; 03-07-2004, 11:08 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Leah & Flora

                Your finished results are terrific. I will have to play with this. I guess I have to learn to use the patch tool!

                Flora, how did you do the selective color? Add more yellow? My daughter's skin has a tendency to have a red cast. She will often use a yellow-toned powder to counter-act that, so it seems natural that you would have added yellow.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Flora
                  I love the first one of your pictures....Was that done with the Patch Tool only?
                  Thanks! - No, like I said I couldn't get the images to load in the right order. So the first picture is patch tool plus copying extra skin over, all reduced to 80% opacity, the second picture is the patch tool alone (so still showing shine round the hair and eyes), and the third picture is patch tool plus copying extra skin over, but at 100% opacity so it looks a bit too 'flat' for my personal taste.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Leah: Having trouble following your steps

                    Do you think you could run this through here again, a bit more "step-by-step."

                    "Finally merged layers and put a copy of the merged image at 80% opacity over the original image."

                    Able to follow you pretty much to this point, but then I lost you.
                    Last edited by CyndieM; 03-07-2004, 02:58 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi again...

                      In the attachment you can see what I did with the Selective Colors ....

                      I worked on the 'Reds' only ....
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Able to follow you pretty much to this point, but then I lost you.
                        Do the patch tool and copying layers until it looks right. Then merge as necessary to get a single layer containing your modified image. Take your original image and put this (modified) layer on top of it. Adjust the opacity of the modified layer to about 80% so that you get a hint of the original picture (with shine) showing through. This should stop the retouched image looking too "flat" if it has a tendency to do so.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Leah, could you explain what the patch tool does for someone who has never seen PS CS?

                          I usually use a duplicate of the original in multiply blend mode (several merged if necessary), then add a hide all mask to the multiply layer and then use a low opacity airbrush to show the mask. The trick here is to get the right amounts of white and black airbrush for the image to look believable.

                          Unfortunately, this does not work because of the amount of pore detail brought out by the flash. What I first did was duplicate the layer, then blurred the duplicate (GB, r=6). I added a hide all mask to the blurred layer, then painted the blur back with a low opacity white brush to remove the pore detail. (This removed quite a bit of the flash highlights. Probably with a higher GB radius you could remove more.) I then duplicated all layers into a new one and removed some more highlights with the clone tool.
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by BigAl; 03-08-2004, 04:08 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BigAl
                            could you explain what the patch tool does for someone who has never seen PS CS?
                            It's in PS7, doesn't require CS (I know you have PSP yourself, but just clarifying for the benefit of other readers).

                            Basically it's like the Healing brush (it's in the same slot on the toolbar). Both of these “look” at the texture, color, and luminosity of the source area separately, then merge the texture from the sample area into the color and luminosity of the destination area. With the Patch tool, rather than using a "brush" you make a selection (with the Patch tool itself or any selection tool), drag the selected area with the Patch tool, and when you releasing the mouse the healing technology (presumably the same algorithms as the Healing brush) makes the repair. You can change the settings so that you select the area to be repaired and drag it onto the sample area (I almost always use it that way round), so that you select the sample area and drag it onto the area to be repaired, or with a "pattern" setting (I've actually temporarily forgotten what that one is used for).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: removing oily, facial shine

                              Originally posted by Flora View Post
                              Hi CyndieM,

                              Welcome to RP!

                              ...here is something else to try for minimizing 'shiny spots':
                              • Create a new Empty Layer (Blending > Darken)
                              • Pick a Soft Brush (Opacity > 30%)
                              • Alt + click on an area very close to the 'Shiny Spot'
                              • Carefully paint over the 'Shiny Spot'
                              • Add just a bit of noise.
                              Flora,
                              You just saved my day with this tip about how to remove facial shine, I know the post is old... but it made my day!
                              Thank you,
                              SueAnne

                              Comment

                              Loading...
                              Working...
                              X