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  • Dodge/Burn layer

    Dodging and burning can be problematic at best. One alternative method I use occasionally is to create a new layer, set mode to 'multiply' and turn the opacity WAY down, then paint with black and/or white (or gray). I feel it gives me more control, plus it also seems to be more tolerant of errors. And you can always turn the layer off and on to compare, and you can delete it totally if you really screw it up.
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  • #2
    Another way to Dodge & Burn in Photoshop 7.0

    Another way to Dodge & Burn in Photoshop 7.0....

    For the Dodge part...
    Create a Solid White layer. Mask it. Change this layer to Lighten. Then, use Eraser tool (Brush mode) in very low opacity (maybe 25%) to erase the areas that needs to be lighter. If necessary, turn on the Airbrush mode (under the Eraser tool) and adjust the Flow control. Make sure that Foreground color is Black and the Background color is White so that you can erase the mask.

    For the Burn part....
    Create a Solid Black layer. Mask it. Change this layer to Darken. Then, use Eraser tool (Brush mode) in very low opacity (maybe 5%) to erase the areas that needs to be darker. If necessary, turn on the Airbrush mode (under the Eraser tool) and adjust the Flow control. Again, make sure that Foreground color is Black and the Background color is White so that you can erase the mask.

    If you lighten or darken the areas too far, just change the Background color to Black and erase one of those areas so that you can bring back the lightness and the darkness of the areas without messing up the original.


    Madtoe
    Junior Member
    Last edited by Madtoe; 06-17-2003, 03:57 PM.

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    • #3
      Another way, which is a little easier as it only has one layer and no masks...

      Create a new layer, fill it with 50% Brightness or use the fill with mid grey command...then set to overlay blend mode (where mid grey is treated as transparent with no effect).

      Now use the dodge and burn tools on this 'fake adjustment layer'.

      To erase paint over with mid grey again.

      Regards,

      Stephen Marsh.

      http://members.ozemail.com.au/~binaryfx/

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      • #4
        Cool. I've used this technique before, but I have never used the Dodge & Burn TOOL on the fake Overlay adjustment layer. I was using the Brush tool and keep switching the blend mode from the Color Dodge to Color Burn or vice versa. The Dodge/Burn tool would be faster.... Neat-o.

        Leigh-Anne

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        • #5
          Steven, I thought of the overlay mode, but I usually use a couple of shades (one lighter, one darker) to paint on it, as I tend to have a little better control that way, than using the dodge and burn tools.

          Tyeise

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          • #6
            Hi,
            I usually paint on this 50% grey layer in overlay mode with a pure white or pure black paint brush.....and adjust the opacity of the brush as I need it.

            that way I can just hit the "X" key to switch from black(burn) to white(dodge) instantly.

            Often...a 10% to 30% brush works well because of its subtleness. If it's touchy work....a 3%-5% opacity is just right.

            P.S This gray layer also works well if you apply the lighting effects filter to it...then it doesn't destroy your image when applying the filter.

            Wide angle.

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