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  • #46
    Re: Colorization

    I'm lost on this step too.

    What are you supposed to get when you press CTRL ALT SHIFT ~ ?

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    • #47
      Re: Colorization

      Originally posted by dooderwear View Post
      I'm lost on this step too.

      What are you supposed to get when you press CTRL ALT SHIFT ~ ?
      The CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-~ shortcut only worked up to CS3. For later versions it's CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-2.

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      • #48
        Re: Colorization

        Anyone have any idea what happened to Ed? He posted this magic and disappeared.

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        • #49
          Re: Colorization

          Had to play ...
          Attached Files

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          • #50
            Re: Colorization

            I'm curious if anyone has experimented with improving the Saturation Mask.

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            • #51
              Hi pixelzombie

              Hard to believe it's been ten years! I’m afraid I haven’t done a lot of colorization in between but I guess from your question that you still see some merit in this approach, or at least potential, which is gratifying.

              In light of the renewed interest Marina Amaral has inspired, I’ve recently begun taking another look at this myself. (I thought colorization was a dead art: if I’d known someone was going to make it cool and get famous I might have persevered!) My opinion now is that everything I did back then was over-the-top – oversaturated, especially in the three-quarter-tones. I also over-relied on saturation variation. i.e. I was lazy – Marina’s work shows that there is no substitute for getting lots of painstaking colour variation in there too. If only we could automate that! (In fact I see that she does to some extent, with randomised colour brushes.)

              I have a new sat mask curve which generally seems to restore the original saturations more accurately when trialling with desaturated colour portraits. There are other things I plan to try, so if you’ve got a better curve, or another way of generating or manipulating the sat mask, or any other suggestions or observations, I’d love to hear them.

              Ed's Sat Mask Curve II.psd

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Ed Fisher View Post
                Re: Colorization

                Ed's Color Method pdf.

                *I've updated the pdf 'tutorial', correcting a serious mistake in the step-by-step procedure (Sat -100, not 0% - apologies to anyone who wasted time trying to work out what was wrong), clarifying a few other points and adding a bit about incorporating Gradient Maps - if you downloaded it before 27/02/08, please upgrade!*
                Is there an active link to Ed's method available ?

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                • #53
                  Hi lacogada
                  I’m revising the EdColor guidance notes at the moment, but here’s the gist of the method:

                  1 Convert your image to LAB mode.
                  2 Add a new blank layer.
                  Set it to Color blending mode.
                  3 Clip a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to the blank layer.
                  4 Duplicate the blank layer + Hue/Sat adj layer combo a few times.
                  5 Add a new Hue/Saturation adjustment layer at the top of the layer stack.
                  Set the Saturation slider to –100.
                  6 Add a luminance mask to this Hue/Sat adj layer. (Trash the existing blank white mask, Opt+Cmd+2 [Mac] or Alt+Ctrl+2 [Win], Add Layer Mask.)
                  7 Apply Ed’s Sat Mask Curve to the luminance mask.
                  8 Paint on the blank layers with colours from the EdColor Palette.

                  Note: There is no EdColor Palette! Use any colours you like, so long as the Saturation is 60% and the Brightness is 100%. (This presumes your RGB working space setting is sRGB – if it’s Adobe RGB, knock the Saturation down to 52%.)

                  The combination of Sat-60/Bright-100 ‘palette’ and Ed’s Sat Mask Curve renders my idea of a good starting-point skintone. Other things are more or less saturated than skin – that’s where the clipped-on Hue/Sat adjustment layers come in: just paint everything on its own layer (background, shirt, lipstick) then crank its saturation up or down until it looks right.

                  (The idea behind the method is this: Varying saturation is the key to convincing colorizing. Instead of trying to paint in different saturations, we paint everything the same (high) saturation then modulate it with a saturation mask. That mask is the luminosity of the original image modified by a solarisation curve [Ed’s Sat Mask Curve] so that it allows most of the saturation in the midtones but reduces it progressively into the highlights and shadows.)

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Ed Fisher View Post
                    5 Add a new Hue/Saturation adjustment layer at the top of the layer stack.
                    6 Add a luminance mask to this Hue/Sat adj layer.
                    Is this done by clicking on the mask from step #5 and changing it's blend mode to Luminosity ?

                    Thanks Ed.

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                    • #55
                      Hi lacogada

                      Sorry to be so slow with my replies – I’m on a break and writing from memory, unable to check anything in Photoshop!

                      No, leave the top Hue/Saturation adjustment layer in Normal blending mode.

                      A luminance mask is just a mask based on the image tones. It looks like a desaturated version of the image. As your image is monochrome anyway, it will look ‘just’ like the image itself. (In fact it will look slightly lighter.)

                      The instructions in brackets should produce the luminance mask. In more detail: Delete the top Hue/Sat adj layer’s default blank white mask (drag the mask on to the trash can in the bottom bar of the Layers palette). Make a selection based on the image luminance (keyboard shortcut Opt+Cmd+2. Alternatively, click on the ‘Load Channel As Selection’ button in the bottom bar of the Channels palette). Make sure the top adjustment layer is still the active layer (click on it). Make a mask from the selection (click on the ‘Add Layer Mask’ button in the bottom bar of the Layers palette).

                      As for applying Ed’s Sat Mask Curve to the mask: You will have previously opened the Photoshop file Ed’s Sat Mask Curve II and saved the curve showing in the Curves adjustment layer to your hard drive. Now you will apply that curve to the luminance mask: Make sure the mask is active (click on it). Go to Curves in the menus (Image>Adjustments>Curves, not a Curves adjustment layer). Load Ed’s Sat Mask Curve II from wherever you saved it. OK.

                      If everything’s gone right, the mask should now be grey in the image midtones and near-white in the highlights and shadows. If it isn’t, apologies – I’ve missed something! When I'm back at my desk I’ll make a little Action to do all this setting up.

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                      • #56
                        No worries Ed ... thanks for the reply and explanation, will have a go with that.

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