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How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

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  • How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

    Hi Guys,

    I've recently stumbled accross the work of this chap. He has a unique painterly effect to his images which for sometime I have been trying to recreate.

    I know as a basis you need to adopt the Rembrandt lighting technique, to create a dark moody image to begin with, but I'm totally flumaxed as how you acheived the subdued tonal effect in PS.

    I have asked the photographer if he can help me but as of yet have had no response.

    On a final note, please do not send me in the direction of the Draganizer Action, as i have tried this and it gets you absolutely nowhere!

    Here is a link to the guys work:

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

    Many thanks,

  • #2
    Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

    In addition to good studio lighting, selective dodge and burn techniques are essential.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

      Originally posted by Swampy View Post
      In addition to good studio lighting, selective dodge and burn techniques are essential.
      I totally agree, but what I'm also keen to understand is the tonal effect that is being acheived. It seems as though the colour tone is ingrained within the skintones.

      Any ideas?

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      • #4
        Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

        That can be achieved by using a color adjustment layer and masking along with setting an appropriate blend mode for the color layer.

        For example, the "Unknown Subject" (lady with scarf) has quite a bit of blue tone in the scarf and her skin. Use a color adjustment layer or fill a blank layer with the appropriate blue/gray. Add a hide all mask and paint in the blue tone on the mask with a soft white low oapcity brush. Play with the blend mode of the color layer. It would be similar to dodging and burning with color instead of light.

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        • #5
          Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

          Here is example.
          Original
          http://www.tvgasm.com/shows/RHNJ/ton...ano-770496.jpg
          retushed
          http://www.shrani.si/f/1b/10M/25Ijjgbo/rembrand2.jpg
          this is my flow.
          http://www.shrani.si/f/2r/pF/2FRcMl8e/rembrandt.jpg

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          • #6
            Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

            I don't know if this is the best way but it certainly is fun;

            http://www.photoshoptalent.com/photo...-rembrandt.php

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            • #7
              Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

              have you tried this work flow by Pam R ? there is a bit more in this bit as well

              i have tried a few things out on this image, but a long way off ( originally posted in the photo art forum ) a better image would help a lot i feel

              Palms
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                Re: How to Acheive Rembrandt Painterly Effect

                Just my two cents...
                The photographer states that he used a Sb600 with shoot through, and seeing as the tint is over the whole image... it may just be a gel like a Wratten 61 which is a deep green cutting filter used for color separation work. These filters when used in portraiture are for mimicking the response of Orthochromatic films... or the photographer might be using a greenish/yellowish filter which is used for tungsten lighting except this photographer is using a strobe/flash which acts differently with the filter.... or it could be that the photographers monitor needs calibrating....
                but in post I feel that the appropriate color on a Hue or Color layer will do the same thing using the methods as stated by the others

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