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High-dynamic range image without HDR software

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  • High-dynamic range image without HDR software

    Yesterday I played with an interior image and achieved a good result as I think.

    The original image was taken during a bright sunlight so there is a lack of details in bright areas and the view outside of window is overexposed.
    The reason for that is a narrow dynamic range of camera. A lot of people here use HDR (high-dynamic range) software to bring more details in shadows and highlights but I decided to use Photoshop only as I have more control over final image.

    What I did:
    I took two more images with -1 and -2 EV stops compared to the original image. -1 stop image provide me more details for the curtains and floor and -2 stop image provide the view outside of window.

    You can see full tutorial at
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=35392068

    (sorry, I can't just place images withing the text body here)
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: High-dynamic range image without HDR software

    You are mistaking the definition of HDR with tonemapping. HDR is any practice of merging exposures that results in an increase in latitud over what the camera provided on one single exposure.

    Of course, non tonemapped HDRs look great and is used more often than people think. I retouch a lot of architecture for hotel catalogues and what not. 90% of the times, the image is composed of various exposures (windows, main exposure and one for the darker areas such as under the furniture). Very rarely would my client (the photographer), and his client (the hotels), accept a tonemapped extravaganza as the images MUST look very real.


    ...so yeah. What you did there is a non-tone-mapped HDR, but i suggest you work on your masking. You can use density masks or even the blend-if function in the layer styles panel. You can also do actual non-tonemapped hdr in photoshop using the merge for HDR function. That will result in a 32 bit image. When you switch it's mode back to 16 or 8 bits, a dialogue will appear asking you "where do you want to put all these values that wont fit in 16bpc". It's basically a curves dialogue with a wider histogram than your monitor can show. Your job is to fit the values in by clipping and/or curving.

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    • #3
      Re: High-dynamic range image without HDR software

      Originally posted by flexmanta View Post
      You are mistaking the definition of HDR with tonemapping. HDR is any practice of merging exposures that results in an increase in latitud over what the camera provided on one single exposure.

      Of course, non tonemapped HDRs look great and is used more often than people think. I retouch a lot of architecture for hotel catalogues and what not. 90% of the times, the image is composed of various exposures (windows, main exposure and one for the darker areas such as under the furniture). Very rarely would my client (the photographer), and his client (the hotels), accept a tonemapped extravaganza as the images MUST look very real.

      ...so yeah. What you did there is a non-tone-mapped HDR, but i suggest you work on your masking. You can use density masks or even the blend-if function in the layer styles panel. You can also do actual non-tonemapped hdr in photoshop using the merge for HDR function. That will result in a 32 bit image. When you switch it's mode back to 16 or 8 bits, a dialogue will appear asking you "where do you want to put all these values that wont fit in 16bpc". It's basically a curves dialogue with a wider histogram than your monitor can show. Your job is to fit the values in by clipping and/or curving.
      Indeed!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: High-dynamic range image without HDR software

        You can use even photomatix to merge the files and save them as an RGBE file, and open it in PS. Somehow, I find Photomatix much better for merging different exposures than PS.

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