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  • avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

    I like to do a highpass sharpening for productshot retouching. I copy the product to its own layer, set the blending mode to softlight and run the highpass filter on it. I am wondering how to avoid some of the color artifacting of this method? I seem to remember that you could go to edit > fade filter and change the blending mode to luminosity immediately after running the filter and that will prevent color artifacting. Is that correct? Suppose I forget to do this step immediately after running the filter. Then how do you deal with the color artifacting?

    Thanks a lot.

  • #2
    Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

    did you try if desaturating the high pass layer works out for you?

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    • #3
      Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

      Is there a particular reason you want to use high pass sharpening as opposed to another method?

      All you can really do is restrict the highpass to lower intensities to try and minimize the artifacts. Otherwise you can brush in a mask by hand.. but I wouldn't really recommend that.

      If you're having a problem with color artifacts when you sharpen, you might try duplicating your image, converting to LAB mode, and running smart sharpen or unsharp mask -only- on the L channel. This will sharpen your image -without- changing any of the color information. You can then duplicate that layer back to your original image. (you can also convert the image you are working on to LAB and switch back when you are done, but I prefer to use a duplicate).

      It's easy to set up an action to do this for you, you can even tell it to stop and ask you what settings to use on your sharpen if you'd like.

      Kyle

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      • #4
        Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

        After creating your highpass layer, you could also create a merge all to new layer, and then set the blending mode of this layer to Luminosity.

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        • #5
          Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

          Thanks for the suggestions. I will try them out.

          I had been using the highpass to sharpen because I liked the way it exaggerated surface texture on products. I was then masking out where the colors got too extreme.

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          • #6
            Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

            Did you already try desaturating (preferably faded to "Color" mode)?

            Another idea would be to clip the high pass layer to an adj. layer in "Luminosity" mode (screenshot attached; I upped the saturation there just to show what the clipping does - applying the changes in "Luminosity" mode only ;-)).

            To prevent noise you could also make a band pass of the high pass by simply blurring it a little (just as much to get rid of the noise of course).
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

              Originally posted by Der_W View Post
              Did you already try desaturating (preferably faded to "Color" mode)?

              Another idea would be to clip the high pass layer to an adj. layer in "Luminosity" mode (screenshot attached; I upped the saturation there just to show what the clipping does - applying the changes in "Luminosity" mode only ;-)).

              To prevent noise you could also make a band pass of the high pass by simply blurring it a little (just as much to get rid of the noise of course).
              Thank you, Jonas. Why fade the desaturation to color and not to luminosity? I really like your suggestion to clip the high pass layer to an adjustment layer set to luminosity. That is working out nicely.
              Last edited by Caravaggio; 02-04-2011, 05:57 PM. Reason: spelling

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              • #8
                Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                If you fade the desaturation to "Luminosity", you'll just take the luminosity of the desaturated version (and the high pass layer will still stay in color).
                Fade it to "Color" and you'll just take the color (=none) and keep the luminosity of the original (the normal desaturation also changes luminosity slightly, that's why "Color" is most of the time preferable).

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                • #9
                  Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                  Originally posted by Der_W View Post
                  If you fade the desaturation to "Luminosity", you'll just take the luminosity of the desaturated version (and the high pass layer will still stay in color).
                  Fade it to "Color" and you'll just take the color (=none) and keep the luminosity of the original (the normal desaturation also changes luminosity slightly, that's why "Color" is most of the time preferable).
                  So to make sure I am understanding you correctly, the work flow for fading a high pass layer to color would be:
                  1.) Create a selection and jump it to its own layer. Run HP filter. Change the blending mode for the HP layer to soft light
                  2.) With the HP layer targeted, choose image> adjustments> desaturate. (Command Shift U)
                  3.) Then immediately go to edit>fade and choose color for the blending mode.

                  Is this correct? Thank you, Jonas.

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                  • #10
                    Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                    Yes, that's correct :-).

                    But as said, the fade is not necessary.
                    If you do it however, you'll have the same effect as clipping the high pass layer to the "Luminosity" layer (the second method I posted).

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                    • #11
                      Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                      i became quiet curious as i've red all your thread. Is the HP you apply differ from the product you apply it on? What is the average? Thank you.

                      Originally posted by Caravaggio View Post
                      So to make sure I am understanding you correctly, the work flow for fading a high pass layer to color would be:
                      1.) Create a selection and jump it to its own layer. Run HP filter. Change the blending mode for the HP layer to soft light
                      2.) With the HP layer targeted, choose image> adjustments> desaturate. (Command Shift U)
                      3.) Then immediately go to edit>fade and choose color for the blending mode.

                      Is this correct? Thank you, Jonas.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                        Originally posted by nebulaoperator View Post
                        i became quiet curious as i've red all your thread. Is the HP you apply differ from the product you apply it on? What is the average? Thank you.
                        I am not quite sure what you mean. It's a separate layer if that is what you mean with the blending mode for the layer changed to usually softlight, but sometimes to overlay or linear light, depending on whether I want a stronger effect. If by average, you are asking what is the radii for the HP, that depends on the res of the image and how strong i want the sharpening to be. I usually choose a radii of between 10 to 30 and back off the effect by masking or lowering the opacity of the layer.

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                        • #13
                          Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                          Yes the separate HP layer above all layers.Wouldn't just normal sharp filter do a job on the soft blend mode layer?

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                          • #14
                            Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                            A normal sharpening filter wouldn't result in the 50% gray layer with the amplified high frequencies, therefore "Soft Light" wouldn't work like it does with high pass :-).

                            But I guess your question was more based on why use high pass on "Soft Light" and not a standard sharpening approach with e.g. USM?
                            I won't go into too much detail here as this'll be way too confusing, but the blending modes from "Overlay" to "Vivid Light" use multiplications instead of additions in their math, therefore the results from using these modes will be different from the traditional sharpening (which uses additions).
                            High pass is just easier to work with these blending modes.

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                            • #15
                              Re: avoiding noise using highpass sharpen?

                              I don't have the technical knowledge of Jonas, but from a visual standpoint, softlight didn't work when I tried duplicating a layer, setting the blending mode to soft light and running unsharp mask on it. The hue shifted radically toward warmer colors and the layer looked much better when I put it back to normal blending mode.

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