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  • this frequency separation you all speak of...

    show me the way to it

    j/k, I was wondering if there is an ultimate tutorial on this tech, so far I only found some really poor elaborated ones on youtube.

    thanks

  • #2
    Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

    and btw, how does it set itself appart (as a technique) from, say, DnB?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

      Frequency separation is a technique that accomplishes something different than d&b.

      I recently covered it in this post; http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/pho...tml#post292871

      Here are my actions so you can try and see how it works:
      http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/att...1&d=1307869520

      -- (copy from thread) --

      Frequency separation basically turns your image into two layers. At the bottom is a layer containing the low frequency details (basically a blurred version of the image), and above that is a layer that contains the high frequency details (the "difference" between the blurred layer and the original). Blended together they should be identical to the original (slight differences might occur due to rounding errors and such).

      This allows you to edit the two components separately. You can clone/heal fine details like pores without affecting the general shades in an area, or the other way around.

      You can also decide to blur away medium size details afterwards on the underlying (low frequency) layer (probably best to do this on a duplicate layer not on full opacity, and with a mask). This can be called "Band Stop" as it removes a band of frequencies. Can be a great help when fighting "blotchy" skin.

      You do not have to use Gaussian Blur (although this is the most common). You could use Surface Blur, Dust & Scratches, Lens Blur, or other filters as a base for the separation.
      Last edited by Chain; 06-16-2011, 07:14 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

        The ultimate post about FS: https://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?t...=439098&page=1

        As to your second question: It's a whole different thing. D&B is used to selectively lighten or darken pixels. FS is used to separate your image into different levels of detail on which you can work individually without having to worry about the other levels.

        Edit: The other Jonas was faster :-)!

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        • #5
          Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

          Step by step if you want to try it manually (it is a bit cumbersome and I usually forget the Apply Image settings, that's why I use actions for it):

          (assuming flat image)
          1. Duplicate background twice. Call the bottom one LF, and top HF. (Hide Background as a backup).
          2. Blur the LF layer until the finest details (those you want to separate out) just disappears. Maybe something like 2-10 px depending on the image.
          3. Select the HF layer, and choose Image > Apply Image
          4. Choose these settings for 8-bit images:
          Layer: LF
          Blending: Subtract.
          Scale: 2
          Offset: 128
          Preserve Transparency, Mask, and Invert should not be checked.
          5. Set the blending mode of the HF layer to Linear Light (100%).

          The result (of the LF + HF layers) now looks identical to the original image. You can work on them separately (e.g. try blurring or airbrushing away unwanted shades on the LF layer). Works nice for straightening out fabric as well, not only skin tones.

          For 16 bit images, apply image should have these settings:
          Layer: LF
          Blending: Add
          Invert: Checked/yes
          Scale: 2
          Offset: 0
          Preserve Transparency and Mask should not be checked.
          Last edited by Chain; 06-16-2011, 02:12 PM. Reason: Did another little mistake... :)

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          • #6
            Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

            Yay, that was some quick response.

            @Chain, I will try your action out, thank you.

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            • #7
              Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

              PS: the actions work fine on layered documents.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                Originally posted by Chain View Post
                For 16 bit images, apply image should have these settings:
                Layer: LF
                Blending: Add
                Invert: Checked/yes
                Scale: 2
                Offset: 9
                Preserve Transparency and Mask should not be checked.
                Offset should be 0, not 9 ;-).

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                • #9
                  Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                  maybe this helps http://nataliataffarel.tumblr.com/po...ng-and-cloning

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                  • #10
                    Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                    but whats it all about that FS...?

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                    • #11
                      Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                      Originally posted by lunaxxxxxx View Post
                      but whats it all about that FS...?
                      Are you joking?

                      Chain explained what it is, and what its used for in his first post.
                      Then proceeded to explain how to do it, and link to a PS action to perform the FS
                      And it was explained further in the thread by very knowledgeable posters.

                      Yes, you must be joking - sorry.

                      --Shift Studio.

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                      • #12
                        Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                        Originally posted by Der_W View Post
                        Offset should be 0, not 9 ;-).
                        *typo fixed

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                        • #13
                          Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                          had my first go, pretty cool, but still feels like i am faster at DnB than this with all the changing layers every now and then... guess i need to find my natural flow.

                          wonder if there was ever a retouchPro Live broadcast with someone using this technique from start to finish. would be an interesting one!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                            Originally posted by P_fuzz View Post
                            had my first go, pretty cool, but still feels like i am faster at DnB than this with all the changing layers every now and then... guess i need to find my natural flow.

                            wonder if there was ever a retouchPro Live broadcast with someone using this technique from start to finish. would be an interesting one!
                            Hi:

                            Although the FS technique, achieves something different then D&B, as some other members stated above, most retouchers use it along with D&B. This technique is also used for some other things, like sharpening, blur, replace texture, hair retouch etc.

                            Here is a link to a simple video about it... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMyae...79CF226CFE4BD0

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: this frequency separation you all speak of...

                              Nothing's going to substitute for meticulous D n B, pixel-level cloning, targeted curves and judicious use of the healing brush. I've personally found the greatest benefit with split frequency layers is in smoothing out tones to a greater extent than is possible with the other tools. Like anything cool, it's easily abused, which is my gripe with the degrunge technique: it's almost impossible to use it without it calling attention to itself. With split frequency layers, you can build up the smoothing effect gradually, in real time. Like any good tool, it simply gives you more options.

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