Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

let's talk colour grade

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • let's talk colour grade

    hello,i've seen a lot of thread on how to get certain looks and they inturn been offer help by professionals in the industry,my question now is directed to these professionals.how did you learn to colour grade ,did you learn it in school,books,dvds.and what adviseor tips would you give to a beginer who wants to get better at colour grade.thank you

  • #2
    Re: let's talk colour grade

    The basic understanding will develop on two fronts.

    1/Study and analyse as many good examples as you can. Pay particular attention to what is happening with the Hue and Saturation in the Shadow, Midtone and Highlight areas.

    2/Get as much practice as possible using curves in the R, G and B channels.
    Start by experimenting with moving the end points only(straight curves!!!).
    One of the commonest effects can be achieved by raising the blue curve at the bottom end and lowering at the top.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: let's talk colour grade

      Originally posted by AKMac View Post
      The basic understanding will develop on two fronts.

      1/Study and analyse as many good examples as you can. Pay particular attention to what is happening with the Hue and Saturation in the Shadow, Midtone and Highlight areas.

      2/Get as much practice as possible using curves in the R, G and B channels.
      Start by experimenting with moving the end points only(straight curves!!!).
      One of the commonest effects can be achieved by raising the blue curve at the bottom end and lowering at the top.

      I read on a thread that masking is also important,do you mask using freehand or do you make use of some masking techniques or Photoshop tools

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: let's talk colour grade

        You can make masks in all sorts of ways. If you're targeting a particular part of an image for colour adjustment, it can be a good idea to make a quick, rough mask before bringing up your adjustment layer. Then, once you've got the adjustment about right, you can fine tune the layer mask to get it just right. This approach avoids spending endless amounts of time unnecessarily "perfecting" a mask prior to applying an adjustment.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: let's talk colour grade

          After a lot of recommandations i bought: Gry Garness e-book on color theory,It was really good. And on amazon you can buy: Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter.
          Another e- book and its free is : " if it`s purple someones gonna die"
          I also bought Stanislavs Peteras dvd and it had a lot of color grading.
          Hope this helps
          Last edited by Rust; 11-03-2013, 10:51 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: let's talk colour grade

            I studied color theory in college. I actually took a class that was part of the physics curriculum,. The book we used was titled, "The Nature of Light and Color." I also worked in the printing and publishing industry, and was trained on the hi-end drum scanners. The settings and adjustments made here required a lot of color knowledge, and understanding of both RGB (Additive color) and CMYK (Subtractive color). One you get that white light is equal amounts of RGB wave frequencies - and that Cyan is the opposite of Red, Blue is the opposite of Yellow, and Magenta is the opposite of Green (opposite is not exactly the correct terminology) and that Black is only used in separations because of the impurities of manufactured inks (primarily Cyan), then things start to click. You learned theory turns into practical reality. Mix Red and Green light on a white wall (in the dark) and the resultant effect will be yellow. You can mimic this in Photoshop. Go to your color picker and type in values 255 for both your R and G channel, leave B at 0. You will have yellow. lots of information online about Additive Color and Subtractive Color Theory.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: let's talk colour grade

              Originally posted by AKMac View Post
              The basic understanding will develop on two fronts.

              1/Study and analyse as many good examples as you can. Pay particular attention to what is happening with the Hue and Saturation in the Shadow, Midtone and Highlight areas.

              2/Get as much practice as possible using curves in the R, G and B channels.
              Start by experimenting with moving the end points only(straight curves!!!).
              One of the commonest effects can be achieved by raising the blue curve at the bottom end and lowering at the top.
              I like explanations like this, but I would go as far as to explain the implications and purpose, as a lot of unexperienced individuals run the risk of picking these things up in a procedural sense rather than an analytical one. I mean consider the implication of your suggestion. The visual appearance of highlights typically depicts areas with a lot of direct reflection. A lower blue value in these areas implies a warmer primary light source, where adding blue to the shadows implies a sense of indirect lighting to the viewer. This comes from outdoor lighting where shadows are typically influenced more by the color of the sky.


              Originally posted by daygraphics View Post
              I studied color theory in college. I actually took a class that was part of the physics curriculum,. The book we used was titled, "The Nature of Light and Color." I also worked in the printing and publishing industry, and was trained on the hi-end drum scanners. The settings and adjustments made here required a lot of color knowledge, and understanding of both RGB (Additive color) and CMYK (Subtractive color). One you get that white light is equal amounts of RGB wave frequencies - and that Cyan is the opposite of Red, Blue is the opposite of Yellow, and Magenta is the opposite of Green (opposite is not exactly the correct terminology) and that Black is only used in separations because of the impurities of manufactured inks (primarily Cyan), then things start to click. You learned theory turns into practical reality. Mix Red and Green light on a white wall (in the dark) and the resultant effect will be yellow. You can mimic this in Photoshop. Go to your color picker and type in values 255 for both your R and G channel, leave B at 0. You will have yellow. lots of information online about Additive Color and Subtractive Color Theory.
              Minnaert's Light and Color in the Outdoors is great too, but it's difficult to find a used copy. For something with a lot of tie ins to photography and videography there's Ron Brinkman's The Art and Science of Digital Compositing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: let's talk colour grade

                Originally posted by AKMac View Post
                The basic understanding will develop on two fronts.

                1/Study and analyse as many good examples as you can. Pay particular attention to what is happening with the Hue and Saturation in the Shadow, Midtone and Highlight areas.

                2/Get as much practice as possible using curves in the R, G and B channels.
                Start by experimenting with moving the end points only(straight curves!!!).
                One of the commonest effects can be achieved by raising the blue curve at the bottom end and lowering at the top.
                Consider what you are doing here by implementing the suggested play. If you move only the B channel curve and leave the R&G untouched, you are in effect, changing how much yellow is in the image. Since R&G have ben left unchanged - the raising of the bottom end, and the lowering of the top end will result in Yellower Highlights and Bluer Shadows. You are also getting somewhat Darker in the HL - since your removing LIGHT. and Lighter in the SHDW because you have added LIGHT.

                If you find that hard to grasp, open your INFO Window. I believe that your INFO window should always be open - and you should refer to it often. Watching it and seeing the number change as you implement any type of adjustment will better help you understand "just what you are doing." After learning what you are doing, you can pretty much predict what will happen to those number [I digress].

                Perhaps a better way to think of this is your HL and SHDW points (not Top and Bottom). Considering that your highlight starts in the upper right corner of your curve and the shadow is the lower left corner. The exact opposite exists for CMYK and Grayscale images. Your HL - LL and SHDW- UR.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: let's talk colour grade

                  apart from curves,any other tips on the selective colour adjustment layer,hue and sat adjustment layer etc

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: let's talk colour grade

                    Back in my earlier days I was as professional drummer... I found that the best way to understand my progress was to listen to my recordings. My ear became more and more trained and so did my playing.

                    Buy a good printer with a quality rip... Color correct and make prints.. examine your prints under good light conditions and critique your work. Have others critique is as well... you'll grow leaps and bounds.

                    Dan Margulis has some great books on color as well

                    Best of luck

                    Comment

                    Loading...
                    Working...
                    X