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Tips on retouching scissors

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  • klev
    replied
    Re: Tips on retouching scissors

    Depending on where they are and the desired end result, there's probably some way that would be faster than another. It's just that from the limited scope of what has been described, I'm not sure it's possible to generalize anything that would provide you with an edge in accomplishing the task. Scratches on metal are annoying, and if you have only one lighting setup of something, with significant flaws, it can be very tedious.

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  • voidsource
    replied
    Re: Tips on retouching scissors

    Thank you for replying klev, my scissors are metal and yes i have not used gradients. The hardest part is to clean out the scratches and watnot, all within a reasonable time limit. This is bc i had several images to go through and im on a deadline. thats why i asked faster tips on how to get it done within a timelimit. I rarely use d&b for silver metals like scissors bc its so much easier to tell an error.

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  • klev
    replied
    Re: Tips on retouching scissors

    You should almost never have to use a gradient map for anything. I've never encountered a situation where it was the ideal way to accomplish something like that. It's also an ambiguous question. What do the scissors look like? How do you want them to look? i'm sure you'll have to mask them out. Beyond that it's just like any other metal, meaning it comes down to how it was lit and the desired end results. Blah reading this back it doesn't sound that helpful, but I guess I have no idea what they look like. Metal can typically be balanced using something like channel mixer. If it's a silver metal, you don't want it to be a completely neutral grey, usually slightly cold looks better. Remember that metals have the tendency to tint their reflections more than other things. Scratches can be cloned out. You will probably have to do a lot of masking as I mentioned. The one area where I would offer a word of caution is that if you try to rely too much on the burn and dodge tools, they can turn things a bit flat and bleh with careless use. Depending on what it looks like, you may have to deal more with adjustment layers after carefully cloning out any scratches or small scrapes, not to be confused with the grain of the metal.

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  • voidsource
    started a topic Tips on retouching scissors

    Tips on retouching scissors

    Currently im retouching scissors and was wondering what are some of the best ways to bring out the silver, darks and lights that it has. Do i use D&B? do I use gradient map? or gradients with different blend modes? etc...

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