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What is happening in this retouch?

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  • What is happening in this retouch?

    Or rather, what layers are being used? Can someone breakdown the techniques he is using in this compositing?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZbs78fkBN8

  • #2
    Re: What is happening in this retouch?

    Normal for the rickshaw, normal for the new wheels, lighten for the first water splash, lighten for the second water splash, normal for the sky, lighten for the third water splash, normal for the pure white glare on the right, then he liquified the original backdrop and sky, used a picture of rain drops, used a curve to reduce the contrast on them, then blurred them and blended them to darken, then we have a DNB layer, probably two curves, then a couple of curves for general color, and local color for buildings and sky, rickshaw etc, and in the end sharpening.

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    • #3
      Re: What is happening in this retouch?

      Thanks.

      What happened around 0:15? And what is the purpose for whatever he did around that time?

      What happened at 0:18?

      I think he did what he did at 0:15 again around 0:20?

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      • #4
        Re: What is happening in this retouch?

        Curves. Curves. Curves.

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        • #5
          Re: What is happening in this retouch?

          Originally posted by skoobey View Post
          Curves. Curves. Curves.
          Considering that brightness contrast was rewritten to a direct scaling operation a couple versions back, it's worth using that at times too. Curves is partly a matter of convention, although I kind of view it as a hack for the limitations of the working space.

          Originally posted by skoobey View Post
          Normal for the rickshaw, normal for the new wheels, lighten for the first water splash, lighten for the second water splash, normal for the sky, lighten for the third water splash, normal for the pure white glare on the right, then he liquified the original backdrop and sky, used a picture of rain drops, used a curve to reduce the contrast on them, then blurred them and blended them to darken, then we have a DNB layer, probably two curves, then a couple of curves for general color, and local color for buildings and sky, rickshaw etc, and in the end sharpening.
          Lighten won't always produce the right effect. You have to be careful. For example the clear parts of water droplets aren't likely to collimate light that passes through them. Rather they have a somewhat dispersive effect and would have fewer rays parallel to the focal plane in the visible range, making for a darker appearance rather than a lighter one. That is a very rough description, but I am merely talking about appearance. I noticed some of his mask edges were a bit on the fuzzy side, and each pass adds a couple adjustments. It's not really a one by one thing.

          If I wanted to offer a very brief recipe for this, I would say sketch or even doodle the concept. Choose elements. Mask out elements from their original backgrounds. Line things up with your drawing, even if it's a really crappy drawing. Get the scale and perspective of these elements to be perfect. It's extremely important. If you have trouble with that part, draw a perspective grid for your imaginary scene, which may not be absolutely identical to any of your working elements. It should not however be further off than you can transform any given element without excessive image degradation. The other stuff is easy. Worry about it later. The part I just mentioned is going to be difficult, and until you can actually do that, the other stuff is useless.

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          • #6
            Re: What is happening in this retouch?

            3 seconds in was the best that job ever looked. A bad idea poorly executed imo.

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            • #7
              Re: What is happening in this retouch?

              Well. when you do something without any professional elements, that's what it ends up looking.

              Compositing is NOT about finding random images off the web that sort-of fit. It is about compositing an image that couldn't happen no matter how professional you are. So you take great individual elements that have been planned at some point or another, and assemble them into an image that was conceived before the first shot was taken.

              You might start with one or few elements that are a must and cannot be replicated, but then everything else is planned.

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