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  • Enlargement Photoshop

    Hi,

    I need to enlarge a photo from 5x7 to 20x30, do I retouch before or after I resize it? Best practices resources (book, link, etc.)?

    Thanks,
    -ar

  • #2
    Re: Enlargement Photoshop

    After if you're looking for maximum quality, and you only resize on export.

    Before if you want to have less work, but you loose all the pixels.

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    • #3
      Re: Enlargement Photoshop

      That is an enlargement bigger than 150% which is the max recommend before you begin losing detail. PS isn't the best at doing this, but it can be done with acceptable results. There are different approaches. If stuck with PS I usually enlarge 150% with Bicubic , then enlarge at 10% increments using Bicubic Smoother. But it all depends on how critical it is.

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      • #4
        Re: Enlargement Photoshop

        My answer was actually there for reduction But, still, you want to change size at the end, as any increase in dimensions blurs softens the image.

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        • #5
          Re: Enlargement Photoshop

          Originally posted by alreese83 View Post
          Hi,

          I need to enlarge a photo from 5x7 to 20x30, do I retouch before or after I resize it? Best practices resources (book, link, etc.)?

          Thanks,
          -ar
          You should really retouch at the finished size (or even larger) if you want to make sure that you have effectively hidden your retouching. The assumption here is that you are talking about a 5"x7" print not a negative or transparency

          The quality of the final image will depend on the quality of your original and scanners capability to resolve detail.

          Reflective material (print) on a scanner: most will not resolve anything more than 600 spi.

          But setting your 7x5 to the scan @r 48 bit @ 1200 spi will yield a file size of 8400 x 6000 pixels which will yield a print of 28" x 20" sending 300 ppi for printer (Canon/HP) close enough to your required size. Retouching at 100% zoom on this file is like working on a 3x size image therefore if you cannot see your working here it is unlikely that anyone else will when looking at the print.

          IMO resizing in PS is mostly as good as any third party application from PS CS5 onwards. It is not recommended these days to use step by step resizing as according to Eric Chan this is more likely to introduce artifacting than going straight to the finished size

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          • #6
            Re: Enlargement Photoshop

            Originally posted by skoobey View Post
            After if you're looking for maximum quality, and you only resize on export.
            Before if you want to have less work, but you loose all the pixels.
            Do that, you're in for some surprises and more 'retouching' after the resample. So for the OP, I'd do the opposite.

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            • #7
              Re: Enlargement Photoshop

              Originally posted by alreese83 View Post
              Hi,

              I need to enlarge a photo from 5x7 to 20x30, do I retouch before or after I resize it? Best practices resources (book, link, etc.)?
              -ar
              http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Print-.../dp/0321908457

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Enlargement Photoshop

                Enlarge first. Enlargement may reveal details of the picture that need a little work before output. Retouching tell tale signs like brush marks, grain/noise additions, comping edges etc will be less visible if left unmagnified.

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                • #9
                  Re: Enlargement Photoshop

                  Yes, it is a print that was scanned at 600, so there is grain...a lot. No, I do not have access to the RAW file, and I am not printing it myself. It is a wedding portrait, that's going to be softened in various places. Thanks for all of the advice / tips, will work according to. But what is SPI?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Enlargement Photoshop

                    And I am using PS CC 2014

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Enlargement Photoshop

                      Originally posted by alreese83 View Post
                      Yes, it is a print that was scanned at 600, so there is grain...a lot. No, I do not have access to the RAW file, and I am not printing it myself. It is a wedding portrait, that's going to be softened in various places. Thanks for all of the advice / tips, will work according to. But what is SPI?
                      SPI = Samples Per Inch and is a measurement of the resolution of the scanner. The more samples per inch, the higher the quality of the scanned image. It is in my opinion a more accurate way of describing a scanners output rather than DPI and can avoid confusion as the terms seem to be freely mixed at times

                      DPI
                      “Dot Per Inch” a measure of printing resolution. DPI is sometimes used instead of SPI but should be reserved for times when referring to print output. Sometimes called Dots Per Inch this in most cases is not quite correct as in printer terms it should be seen as a measure of volume or Droplets Per Inch (usual to quote in picolitres - 1 trillionth of a litre)

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                      • #12
                        How many pixels?

                        Originally posted by alreese83 View Post
                        Yes, it is a print that was scanned at 600, so there is grain...a lot.
                        600 (PPI or whatever) tells us nothing!
                        You are referring to what is a resolution tag and it's rather meaningless. It could be 72PPI or 180PPI or 600 PPI but it doesn't have an inherent meaning, only what you could produce with the number of pixels you have at your disposal. Work with pixels! For example, let us say you have 1000x1000 pixels to keep the math simple. And to simplify this further, let's only consider the horizontal axis. If you have 1000 pixels and divide that by 72, that is, you provide 72 pixels per inch, you could end up with 13.8 inches using that division (1000/72=13.8). Let's now say you divide up your 1000 pixels using 180 instead. 1000/180=5.5. In both cases, you had 1000 total pixels. The document itself doesn't have a size, other than what space it takes up on your hard drive. The sizes above are examples of what could be produced if you divided up the total number of pixels you have, with some number of which is just a tag within the document. In Photoshop, if you use the Image Size dialog, turn resample OFF (do not allow it to create more or remove pixels), you can enter any value, 72, 180, 1000 into the resolution field and the resulting size is calculated for you. But you haven’t changed the document or the data at all. You just changed a theoretical 'size' if you output your 1000 pixels using that resolution. So again, it's meaningless until you output the data. At that point, lets say you print the image, you can decide how big you wish it to appear and/or how many pixels you want to devote to the output. You have 1000 pixels and someone tells you that you must use 300DPI (which isn't true but that's a different story). 1000/300 would produce a 3.3 inch print. You want a bigger print? Lower the DPI (within reason). You set the DPI for output to use 180 of your pixels to produce 180DPI? You get a 5.5 inch print (1000/180=5.5).

                        Work with pixels. That's a fixed attribute of the data unless of course you resample that data (add or remove pixels).

                        So, how many pixels WxH do you have?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Enlargement Photoshop

                          Using VueScan also has proven helpful. This"little" project has totally expanded my knowledge on both on scanning and enlargement! Oh, and color management. Once again thanks for the input and rethinking tips, yet another vocabulary to learn.

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